ham operator license

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by james_black, Nov 2, 2009.

  1. james_black

    james_black New Member

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    Want to become a Ham Radio Operator. I have the book and I know what I should do to take the test for it. I go to my local operator meetings every month etc etc. Now this is my dilema.

    I'm more of a Visual learner. There is a visual way to learn or study for the Tech test? If any let me know please. Thanks in advance.
    :)
     

  2. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Ham radio is a voice sorta thing, if visual is your thing then this might not be the hobby for you:confused:
     
  3. yesicarry

    yesicarry New Member

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    Ok.. I think I know what you are saying.. As far as hooking up and matching antennae ? Frequency settings and ranges? Morse code?

    Well, first of all most of the knowledge you need is only by books. Read while you are doing it.. Worked for me..

    Been there done that.. Lots of fun and create friends around the world verbally. On the down side, Very expensive !..

    And you thought firearms can get costly ?..hehe...Good luck and have fun..
     
  4. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    What the hell are you doing with a Ham that you need a lic?
     
  5. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    Operating on it. ;)
     
  6. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yg78bJqSl0]YouTube - Introduction to Ham Radio : How to Obtain a Ham Radio License[/ame]

    There were a bunch of hits for ham radio. :) Talk hard.
     
  7. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    Quick derail, as I know absolutely nothing about this, but am now intrigued.

    Why? What is the purpose today of Ham radio?

    And it's licensed?

    And what is expensive?

    Tell me more.:confused:
     
  8. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    ^^^ It would be handy if the interweb went offline.
     
  9. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    I agree, but there must be more to it. Why do you Ham guys do it? What am I missing?
     
  10. yesicarry

    yesicarry New Member

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    There are groups across the U.S. that is basically setting up networks to keep communication going in case of a disaster.
    The expensive part ? Equipment.. Sure, you can get cheap stuff but how long will it last ? Then once you get into the hobby, your always looking for a better transmitter or reciever or tower..

    But, it's a lot of fun making friends all around the world..
     
  11. Cnynrat

    Cnynrat New Member

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    Since they eliminated the requirement to learn Morse code for the license I think more people are getting involved to complement specific activities such as off-roading. More and more off-roaders are moving from CB to ham radio because it's capable of much longer distance communications, the quality is much better, and it's easier to find a clear frequency.

    People commonly talk about using ham for emergency communications, and there are groups that practice for such events. Not something I'm really into, but nice to know I'll have another form of comms in case of a SHTF event.

    Getting the basic Tech class license is pretty easy. You just need to have a knowledge of the basic rules, operating procedures and basic electricity concepts. With that license the most popular radios are in the 2 meter band - these are popular for mobile applications.

    2 meter mobile radios run anywhere from $200-$400, maybe a little more. A base station might be a little more, but they would probably have more capability. You can get a decent 2M hand held (basically a very capable walkie-talkie) for under $200.