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Instead of investing in gold or silver would it be a better idea to invest in firearms and ammo? Silver and gold are just metal assets that can not be used there just there to look shiny and worth money. But firearms like lets say a colt ar15 brand new never shot kept in a safe can be used if needed but also would it be worth money lets say in 15 years? And im talking about modern firearms not relics from the 1800s or ww2 era so tell me what you all think whats your opinion?
 

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I think so and me and my husband have been doing just that for awhile now. It has been working for us but I am sure this type of investment isn't for everyone.
 

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If your going to invest in guns, you need to buy investment quality guns. A cheap gun is still a cheap gun.
 

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An AR takes up alot more room and weighs alot more than a one ounce gold coin, even a high-relief collectors American Eagle...
 

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There maybe a better place then the C&R section. What you are missing is Rifles from WWII have a historic significance that makes them worth more then a modern rifle made by the same company. Mauser makes a Modern K98k. It will never be worth as much as a WWII K98k. Collectors drive the market. Why would anyone buy a Colt AR15 that is 15 years old when they can buy a new one? If you were talking Vietnam era, that would change things.
 

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I like gold and silver because they are world wide currency. On the other hand, I have yet to buy a gun that is worth less now then what I paid for it. Both markets can change fast as we have just seen. Today it's a sellers market as far as guns go.
 

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Gold, Silver, Guns & Ammo (plus food & water) are what interests me when investing in one's survival down the road (and beyond).
 

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Then the Goverment

And a lot depends on what the Goverment does 10, 20, 30 years down the road. Who knows if you will even be able to sell your guns years from now. The so called "universal" background check will just be another step in that direction. All that being said, I still plan to keep buying guns and putting them in the vault and see what happens.
 

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Good guns will hold or rise in value over time. But many times it's a you have to watch things and time sales at just the right time. I use dot buy a lot of hunting shotguns when there was no hunting going no and was not going to be for a while. A little before turkey season I could unload them and make a few bucks. Older guns with historic value might be a better investment but that market is really customer driven so it's hard to tell when/if you can get a good return on them.
It's not the most stable way to invest and the gains are usually not all that great. But you can make some money if you shop right. I lean more to things liek gold and silver though. Silver is still cheap enough that you can get a decent amount and sit on it and it will make more than you have in it in fairly short order. I lurk eBay and the like for what is listed as junk silver coins and OZ bullion. The collector value isn't there but you are getting decent weight They also in case of bad times will still work as currency. Old nickels are kind of cool too. Pre 64 coins are made of nickel and are worth their weight even if they are trashed. Ones minted form 1942 to 1945 (Wartime Silver Alloy) have a little silver but I don't think it's more than like 15%. I can't remember to tell the truth the actual percentage.

AS got gold...The stuff is worth it's weight ion gold! Nuff said there.

The big plus to the coins over things like guns is you wont get your coins used against you in a worst case scenario.

A little food for thought...All the pins on the bottom of computer processors have gold pins. I like to try and reclaim them when I'm trashing an old machine. :)
 

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I thought there was a law that doesnt let you melt pennies and nickles.......


By Barbara Hagenbaugh, USA TODAY 12/14/2006
WASHINGTON — People who melt pennies or nickels to profit from the jump in metals prices could face jail time and pay thousands of dollars in fines, according to new rules out Thursday.

Soaring metals prices mean that the value of the metal in pennies and nickels exceeds the face value of the coins. Based on current metals prices, the value of the metal in a nickel is now 6.99 cents, while the penny's metal is worth 1.12 cents, according to the U.S. Mint.

That has piqued concern among government officials that people will melt the coins to sell the metal, leading to potential shortages of pennies and nickels.

"The nation needs its coinage for commerce," U.S. Mint director Ed Moy said in a statement. "We don't want to see our pennies and nickels melted down so a few individuals can take advantage of the American taxpayer. Replacing these coins would be an enormous cost to taxpayers."

Under the new rules, it is illegal to melt pennies and nickels. It is also illegal to export the coins for melting. Travelers may legally carry up to $5 in 1- and 5-cent coins out of the USA or ship $100 of the coins abroad "for legitimate coinage and numismatic purposes."

Violators could spend up to five years in prison and pay as much as $10,000 in fines. Plus, the government will confiscate any coins or metal used in melting schemes.
 

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When investing, diversification is the key to long term success.

Don't speculate that putting all or most of your money into one asset class will see you safely through any future scenario.

Any investment advisor, worth his salt, will tell you that you need to put aside 6 months worth of liquid assets first, to sustain you and your family through unforeseen circumstances.

Those assets may be different than the traditional money market/savings that many have become accustomed to, in our society.

Prepare for the short-term needs of your family first, before you invest for the long-term. But after you have assured, to the best of your ability, your families viability near-term, absolutely invest in assets that may not be liquid, but have excellent potential for long-term appreciation in value!
 

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I didn't buy my guns for investment but even before the current scare they have trippled in value in most cases. WWII milsurps will dry up even more than now and be a far better investment over time. Ammo is also a good investment, Hoarders drive the market. Obama has done more to appreciate the value of guns than any other entity. If you are a seller thank him if you are a buyer, blame him.
 

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Precious metals are a terrible investment. Especially at this time of inflated "values". If you took a one once gold coin to the grocery store and tried to use it to buy $1,600 worth of groceries, they would laugh you out of the store. Precious metals at their commodity "values" are not legal tender.
 

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Anybody know the silver content in current one dollar, fifty cent, quarter and dime coins?
 

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Zero.........
 

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There maybe a better place then the C&R section. What you are missing is Rifles from WWII have a historic significance that makes them worth more then a modern rifle made by the same company. Mauser makes a Modern K98k. It will never be worth as much as a WWII K98k. Collectors drive the market. Why would anyone buy a Colt AR15 that is 15 years old when they can buy a new one? If you were talking Vietnam era, that would change things.

While I agree with what you say, a modern AR can still be a good investment.. the RRA I bought a year ago is going for more than twice what I paid because of the current market.
 

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" Bang" investments....

If you want to invest part of your money in guns, take a lesson from my dad's and my grandfather's generations. Right now, Mosin Nagant 91\30s and Nagant revolvers are DIRT cheap. A case of 91\30s would set you back about $15-2,000 , and the revolvers are going for about $125 each. Pick up a case of each, open the case, inspect them, leave them packed in the cosmoline, and store them for the next 50 to 60 years. Do not do to them what was done to most of the 1903 Springfields, the 1917 Enfields, and a lot of Mausers. Many of these rifles were Sporterized (Butchered is a much more fitting adjective!) which in the current collector's market made what were once $40 rifles, $200 hunting rifles instead of $1200 rifles. Many of the old milsurps were taken down, the military pieces cut up or thrown away, and modified to make big game rifles. This drove up the cost of the originals, and the unmodified junk that is still out there.

The latest milsurp that is getting sporterized? The Mosin Nagant. That's the reason why I have 2 MNs that are getting sporterized, and I have saved and packed away the military furniture and parts. I also have 5 91\30s, 2 M44s, and a type 53 that are still packed in the cosmoline in my collection. The wife and I also have 3 Nagant revolvers (1 shooter, 2 savers) as well. The plan is to keep these ones original, and see where the market goes over the next few decades. If all goes well, the values will go up a little. If enough people out there cut them up, the sky is the limit.

I have 2 pieces that were my grandfather's in my collection. One is a 1903 Springfield Mark I that he sporterized, and an Arisaka Type 99 that he did not. If he had not cut up the Springfield, it would be worth twice what the Arisaka is, and he did the modifications on the 1903 the right way, he just forgot to keep the old parts when he did it. Learn from his mistake. I did.
 

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While I agree with what you say, a modern AR can still be a good investment.. the RRA I bought a year ago is going for more than twice what I paid because of the current market.
But, once the bubble is over, it will be worth closer to 1/2 of its' current value.
 
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