Gun Control Presentation - Sheriff Joe Clark

Discussion in 'Firearms in the Media' started by Sniper03, Dec 5, 2017.

  1. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Please take the time to listen to Sheriff Joe Clarke's presentation to the end to get the true point of it.
    It is very interesting where some of the Liberal Left got their anti gun ideas from.
    As stated please listen to the end and do not jump to a conclusion in the beginning and stop it like I almost did!
    03

    Sheriff Clarke: Gun Control Was Meant to Keep Arms Away from Black People
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2017
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  2. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    he's correct. early gun control laws were established to keep guns out of freed slaves and blacks.

    it's much easier to intimidate and control a group if they are unarmed and unable to defend themselves.

    and after the Civil War, the Confederates had lost the war, and now slaves were freed, and many in the southern states needed a method to control those freed slaves, so hence they established Jim Crow laws and also thus was born the Ku Klux Klan and others in an attempt to intimidate and control freed slaves from having any measure of control whatsoever. they also established poll taxes in an effort to also gain political control by keeping freed blacks from being able to vote.
     
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  3. Fred_G

    Fred_G Active Member

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    I like Clark, great video.
     
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  4. Mongo

    Mongo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I hope Sheriff Joe Clark runs for congress. He is qualified and would be an asset for the Constitution.
     
  5. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Gun control is about controlling people; whatever kind of people: race, religion, wealth.....
     
  6. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    And gun control was one of Sal Alinsky's 8 steps to socialism....which the Democratic Party has followed like a handbook. I"m not trying to start a political war in this forum. But merely stating the facts is something that everyone has to be aware of. If it walks like a duck.....etc......you all know the rest.
     
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  7. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It is an oversimplification of a complex problem. It appeals to emotion without offering workable solutions. It is the kind of language that tends to fire up supporters but it is lacking in substance.

    If the problem was simple, it would have been solved long ago.
     
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  8. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have been a 1000% supporter of gun control my entire live and have been teaching it for 40+ years. But I oppose to ALL anti-gun policies, legislation and laws and refuse to enforce them!:mad:
     
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  9. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would like to address the "Klan" part of your post. I am going to ramble, so if you are looking for a quick tweet, you just as well move on. :) It is a personal perspective, and therefore, not subject to proof or any verification, but it is an issue that I have devoted some thought to. Like it, or hate it, or think it is unadulterated horseshirt, it is honest.

    While I agree, in general with your post, it is my understanding, from a Southerner's perspective, that the Klan was formed to primarily to fight the injustice of the occupying Union Army, and army of carpetbaggers, as well as to keep the "dangerous" blacks in check. This notion is based on some family history that I will share:

    Because of my long family history of having children late in life, an my being of an advanced age, it places me a bit closer to the oral history of the war and the "reconstruction." It does not mean that the oral history is technically correct, but it does mean that it is valid. It also helps that I am fortunate to be in possession of some journals, kept by family, during the reconstruction. These documents, while not anything ground shaking or ground breaking speak to the day to day life of a small corner of the Post-war South.

    I will tell you this, my family hated carpetbaggers with a passion. (they didn't love Yankee soldiers either) The Union occupying army and the flood of carpetbaggers that followed them, felt it was their duty to punish the people of the South, for their rebellion, and they did it with a passion. I really do not believe that Northern troops or the carpetbaggers had any love for black people, but they didn't mind using them to suit their needs.

    My family did not hate the freed slaves even if the felt superior to them. It is hard to hate people you have lived and worked with for generations. The, unverified, story is that, on my Grandfather's plantation, the majority of slaves remained working on the land as share-croppers, and what is verified, is that many of them took the family surname. (that explains why you see a lot of black families with Scottish surnames)

    Unlike many, I do not feel "guilty" about the actions of my ancestors. (I have the guilt of my own sins to worry about) I had nothing to do with my ancestor's failings, and will not assume responsibility for their actions. Neither do I support their notion that it was EVER right to buy, sell and profit from the work of enslaved people. (my ancestors either knew, or should have known better) I do, however, understand why they did what they did, even if I disagree with their morals and their methods. You do have to view history through the lens of the past, not the present. In their time, their actions were accepted as just and honorable. There are things we do today, that we consider just and honorable, that will be viewed, in the future, as immoral and unjustified. Times change, and as a society, we hopefully, progress from darkness to light.

    My grandmother was married to the son of plantation and slave owners. (My grandfather was born during the early war period and grew up on a large Northern Alabama slave plantation that had been in the family for generations). My Grandfather died long before my birth so I never had the chance to converse with him, but I spent a lot of time with my Grandmother.

    While my Granny was certainly racist, and believed, without question, in white supremacy, and black inferiority, it was the Union occupiers that held a special place, of hatred, in her heart. (It may have had something to do losing great wealth) The Klan was known, during reconstruction, as the protector of the people from the Army of Occupation. Of course, over time, the Klan morphed in both their goals and in the way they were perceived by the mainstream south. Power corrupts. By the end of my Grandmother's life, her Christian values would have no sympathy with the Klan, although she died feeling superior to all blacks.

    My adult father was certainly racist by today's standards, but he would have been considered liberal in his times. In his community, he was surrounded by Klansman, many of which would have been is Masonic brothers. To my father's credit, he never showed any sympathy for the Klan and he hated a Nazi like I do.

    My father and my uncle were in town in Marianna, Fl., I believe it was in the 1930s, on the day of a famous lynching, but neither accepted an invitation to watch the spectacle. They concluded their business and went home. They both professed that they were quite shocked and disgusted at their neighbors for participating in such an atrocity. Both my father and uncle professed shame over the the actions of their neighbors, and, from talks with my Uncle, late in his life, he regretted that he did nothing to attempt to stop the action. (which would have probably got him hung too) He died carrying that guilt.

    Continuing the history, I grew up in a household that considered whites superior to blacks. My mother was college educated and was a bit more liberal than my father, but we were taught confidence that we were indeed better than our black neighbors. After our schools were integrated, while I was in middle school, I began to question that notion because of the direct observation of some of my black classmates, one of whom graduated school as valedictorian. While I still carry some of the baggage of my childhood, I did my best to not pass that on to my children. I believe it worked.

    Today, (if it ever could) the Klan can not be associated with any "noble" motives. They are White Nationalist who are based on hate of anyone who is not a WASP, and any WASP that does not share their "values." They are no different from the Brown Shirts of the 1930s, and if given free reign, they would carry out pograms just as their brothers in spirit did during WWII. These people march, hand in hand with the Neo-Nazis and share their perverted values. There are not may things in my life that I can describe with the term "hate", but I would not piss on a Klansman or a Neo-Nazi if they were on fire. I would, however, do the right thing and dispose of their ashes...in the sewer with the rest of the XXXX.
     
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  10. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That's a good piece and, from my own personal memories, having lived in similar times and circumstances in North Mississippi, quite accurate. That's the way it was! It speaks of the attitudes not only of my family but for everyone we knew.

    I've often wanted to write something like this but Chain said it much better than I ever could.

    Thanks!!!
    ellis
     
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  11. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    most excellent post Mr. Chainfire!

    you did expand upon the reason or history of the Ku Klux Klan, where as in my previous post simplified it. and the Klan of yesteryear and in the beginning was much different Klan than the one that exists in these current times. i think your observation of the current Klan is pretty much spot on.

    as that i'm a little bit younger than you, i did see some of the tail-end of some of the racism that existed from 1950's and 1960's. not much, but still some.

    our family was in East Texas from the very early 1900's on forward.now my own observations that i witnessed from my ancestors was a little different. farmers and sharecroppers, and landowners who ran logging and sawmill operations, along with some small business'. growing up i remember there being a separation between blacks and whites. not superiority or inferiority, but separation between the two. my family did employ blacks to work the farms, the woods and the other business'.

    and yes, i agree, we tend to look back at history even our own personal history from a viewpoint rooted in current times. i'm sure my perspective is different from my father's, my grandfather's, and my great grandfather's perspective of the same events and time frame. my great grandfather was born not long after the Civil War in the 1870's. so i'm sure his viewpoints on the Reconstruction period would be much different than ours!
     
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  12. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Not exactly, but you are close. ;) ALL anti-gun laws and permit requirements in this country were a product of large corrupt political machines in OUR larger cities and some of our smaller jurisdictions to disarm the opposition and citizens in general all so they could CONTROL THEM (wait for it) IN THE INTEREST OF PUBLIC SAFETY!!. :mad:
     
  13. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    no Jim, you need to read what i wrote. i didn't say all gun control laws, but the early ones.

    stay focused on what i say and don't infer opinions that i may not have. i don't need someone putting words into my mouth for me. i can speak for myself.
     
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  14. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No, just admit when you are wrong and get on down the road. ;) Some anti-gun laws in the 'south' were to control blacks, the VAST majority of them were enacted for the reasons I stated. But keep trying and you will eventually get it right!!!:)
     
  15. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A
    Now the BLACK LIVES MATTER organization as taken the place of the KKK, but it is ok to spread the hate if you are a minority!!!
     
  16. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    you have just proven again, why no one can have civil discussion with you Jim.

    i was not talking about all gun control laws.

    i don't admit that i was wrong, because i didn't say ALL gun control laws.
     
  17. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And you did not see the wink! Lighten up and you will live alot longer!;):rolleyes:
     
  18. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    Jim, i'm about as light as i'm going to get. and please don't concern yourself with my life expectancy. and lightening up isn't going to lengthen it in any way.

     
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  19. Fred_G

    Fred_G Active Member

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    Chainfire, I don't always agree with you, but that was a very interesting post, with your personal historical perceptive. Very interesting, thanks.
     
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  20. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am concerned about all of my friends life expectancy! :) At this stage in life they seem to be 'passing on' more often than I would like.:( So there!:p