gun company

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by blueminiballer, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. blueminiballer

    blueminiballer New Member

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    Im a freshman in high school and was wanting to know what i needed to start doing to start a gunsmith or gun manufacturing business
     
  2. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    take every shop class available to you.
     

  3. Ranger-6

    Ranger-6 New Member

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    After shop class get a Federal Firearms License...
     
  4. kryptar19

    kryptar19 New Member

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    Go to a gunsmithing school and get a degree
     
  5. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    get a degree in business also. learn how to attract investers, because starting a gun business, or any business for that matter is costly.
     
  6. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Take shop classes, get an FFL, and either go to a Gunsmithing trade school (one of the best is in Colorado), or find a gunsmithing master that would be willing to take you under his wing. (gunsmithing master does not mean Bubba in his shed (at least not most of the time :D))
     
  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    aaron, i represent that remark, sorry, i resent that remark, i have a shed, but my name ain't Bubba! lol:eek::D
     
  8. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    lol, I said "at least not MOST of the time". You fall into that small percentage of people who are master backyard gunsmiths. :D :p
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2012
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    aaron, i'm not a gunsmith by any means, more of a recreational enthuiast who enjoys tinkering on guns in my shed. just poking a little fun at your statement though! lol! :D
     
  10. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    lol, thats still more then I do. I have an old sxs that I have taken apart many times to refinish it (cold blue SUCKS, and I can't find the parts I need to make the guns safe and functional. :(), but that is where my gunsmithing experience ends. I'm hoping to get into more gunsmithing, I just need to find another project, or finish the one I'm working on if I can get a decent finish on it, and find those parts. But that is for another thread. I think I may go start it now. :D
     
  11. Sonic82

    Sonic82 New Member

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    While your researching the best route...take some manual machinest courses from any vocational school ie; lathes, mills and drill presses...it will be a real asset.
     
  12. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Blue- In order to be a gun smith, gun maker, or gun seller, you need a Federal Firearms License. You have to be at least 21 to get one, so you have some time to learn the skills you would need.

    What skills? Well, manual arts will be important. Wood working, metal working, how to use machine tools, how to weld.

    Math and business are also important- if you are planning on having a business. And it IS an expensive business to get started. You will also want to learn as many computer skills as you can- for recordkeeping, research, and being able to FIND information.

    After high school, TWO of the very good gunsmithing schools in the US are in Colorado. But there is also a very old means of learning a craft- find someone that IS a master at that craft, and wants a helper- and apprentice yourself to them You provide them with labor, they provide you with knowledge and guidance. HOWEVER, not everyone that is good at what they do is good about teaching it to someone else. If you decide to go that route, spend a few YEARS picking your mentor.
     
  13. Sonic82

    Sonic82 New Member

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    Oh...and since you're young and have time....you could get your feet wet in the trade by joining the Navy or Coast Guard as a Gunners Mate.
     
  14. Durangokid

    Durangokid New Member

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    I considered this career at one time. I was young at the time. I worked one summer in a shop doing grunt work. I found that it was not for me. It would be something you should look into.:)
     
  15. 7mmstw

    7mmstw New Member

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    Gunsmithing is a fun hobby, extremely hard to make it on your own and if you work for someone they pay you peanuts, and gunsmithing school cost me close to $60k with moving, cost of living, expenses, armorers classes, if you are loaded by all means go for it though.
     
  16. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    many get into as a hobby or side job, until they build a customer base that will allow them to do it full time. these people will have a full time job and do their gunsmithing at night and on the weekends. some go to work as an apprentice in a shop and learn under a master gunsmith while they fine tune their craft. the modern age has changed how the public uses them now. they aren't near in demad as they were many years ago, but that's why we need more of them. the modern age has changed many peoples ways of doing things, we have become a people who use something, then get rid of it when it no longer functions. many years ago, people took guns in to be fixed when they broke or didn't work correctly. think about this, when was the las time anyone saw a small appliance repair shop? there use to be two in the town i live in, they went out of business years ago, because of modern thinking. i truly hope you pursue this and decide to become a gunsmith because we do need more of them and not allow it to become a craft that dies out. good luck to you.
     
  17. Durangokid

    Durangokid New Member

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    So true the day of the gun tinkers is about gone. The new shops are run by men who can do magic with modern machine tools. Cylinder & Slide, Red Jacket Etc. are the modern go to shops. The tinker who makes small parts with a file has given way to modern CNC and heat treaters etc.:)
     
  18. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Plus it is so much easier for people to work on their own guns now. You can go online to find out how to take your gun apart and someone will tell you what is wrong with it. You can order the parts yourself online and even check prices to see who is cheaper.