Gun Cleaning

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by Polygon, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    Forgive me for such a simpleton request.

    Despite the fact that I'm very familiar with shooting guns I have never stripped one down. I have never cleaned any of my guns. I've been taking them to someone for that. Even though this person does it for a fair price I'd like to learn to do it for myself.

    I don't want to start a business here. I just want to become proficient in stripping down my own guns an clean them. I've been looking through products all morning and I have no idea what to get. So, I could really use some suggestions. Also, any websites or books you could point me to on the subject would be great!
     
  2. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    There are lots of youTube videos on the subject. You might want to check them out.

    Do you have handguns, rifles, both? You will need the appropriate rods, tips (like jags and brushes), and patches for both, not to mention calibers. Fortunately, two or three cleaning rods cover just about all the calibers out there, or at least the most common.

    Look into the cleaning kits available at places like Gander Mountain, Bass Pro, Cabela's, etc. If you don't have one near you, check out the websites for Midway or Natchez.

    Any more questions, just ask. Lots of people here would be happy to help you.
     

  3. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    I have rifles, shotguns, and pistols.

    I took your advice and went to Youtube and checked out some videos. I saw a few generic videos about cleaning and it really helped with products. Then I looked at some more specific disassemble videos for guns that I own which was VERY helpful.

    In fact, I just stripped down my PM9 a few minutes ago. Can't believe how simple it is. Now I just need to grab some supplies.

    Before I do that I do have one question. Would you shy away from an "all caliber" cleaning kit and lean towards getting specific kits for each caliber you own?
     
  4. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    I buy all caliber cleaning kits, just because I want to cut down excess clutter in my house when I can :eek:. It's a good thing to know how to disassemble you firearms so that way you can become more "attatched" to them, and fix problems that may occure if you know how to.
     
  5. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    All-caliber kits should be okay, depending upon how serious you are. The only reason I don't like them is because I like one-piece rods, as opposed to the screw-together kind, and jags/brushes that are more caliber-specific.

    But I've been called anal by many! <insert witty comment here>
     
  6. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Most gun cleaning kits I've seen in places like WallyWorld have too much of some things and not enough of others.

    Picks, tooth brushes, etc... that are useful in gun cleaning are scattered all over the store and I (for one) don't enjoy seeing "the people of Walmart".
     
  7. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    Looks like a found a nice all caliber kit from Hoppes. All it has is a rod, Hoppes No. 9, some patches, and some lube in a nice case. That way I can just get what brushes I need, some Shooter's Choice, and some other small odds and ends.

    Yeah, that sort of why the idea appealed to me. I don't really want a kit for every gun sitting around.

    Same here. Most people that know me well go as far to call me OCD.

    I know exactly what you mean. I worked at on when I was a teenager. Now, I avoid Wal Mart like the plague.
     
  8. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    I enjoy cleaning my firearms; hope you turn out to like it, too!
     
  9. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    I think I will.

    I assemble and repair desktops, laptops, servers, and printers for a living. Another hobby of mine is working on cars.

    It should be be second nature. I can't wait to tear down my Winchester 1897 and get the action working smoothly again. :D
     
  10. Minionsram

    Minionsram New Member

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    I myself prefer Otis kits, they are kinda pricey but well worth it. Also a used toothbrush, dental picks, and some old cotton t shirts are great. As far as field stripping them you can get a book for that. somrthing like this (there are more this is just one) Amazon.com: The Gun Digest Book of Firearms Assembly/Disassembly Part I - Automatic Pistols (Gun Digest Book of Firearms Assembly/Disassembly: Part 1 Automatic Pistols) (Pt. 1) (9780873417839): J B Wood: Books

    there is a multitude of cleaners and soulitions on the market. some of us have our favorites and others might hate some. I myself like Gun Scrubber from birchwood casey, butches bore shine, and hoppes elite. just follow the directions on any cleaner you use.

    After cleaning a VERY light coat of oil and a dap of EWG on the moving parts is what i do. here is a link to ewg.
    Extreme Weapons Grease: SLiP2000™
     
  11. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    No, not you Lon!! :p

    For me, the "cable" in the Otis kits just doesn't do it. I understand the concept, but just don't like it. If I say any more, I will end up in the "foot-in-mouth" thread. If you buy a basic all caliber kit, you can always add parts as you go. A small tackle or tool box works well when you out grow the original case.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2011
  12. Fisherking

    Fisherking New Member

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    Stick to one piece rods that are coated, with carbon fiber ore some other coating that wont hurt your barrle. and remember to wipe off your rod after every pass through the barrle.
    F.K.
     
  13. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    start simple and basic hopps no 9 and rem oil clean from the BREACH carbon fibre or brass rods and go light on the oil
     
  14. Goodgold

    Goodgold New Member

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    Actually, the guy at the local Walmart is extremely knowledgeable about guns, cleaning, etc. Walmart also has great prices on ammo.
     
  15. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    you got the idea dont complacate it. wall mart sales man like so many he can talk the talk but does he walk the walk?
     
  16. jeffxc

    jeffxc Member

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    You could also go online to the manufacturer's website to find the "book" that comes with the guns...they'll tell you how to disassemble (and reassemble) for cleaning. Some of them which I have almost give you step by step instructions.
     
  17. JAMESACERRA

    JAMESACERRA New Member

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    Cleaning your friends

    Howdy Y'all
    It's a fine tradition to clean your own weapons...but your gunsmith needs love too. LOL.
    If you need directions for field stripping your weapons be they long guns or short there are many fine links that can help.
    page7b This one covers a ton of weapons new and old.T E X T F I L E S and another they are PDF files but seein as you work on the gear you can deal with that. You will find that tools and gear stack up over time, old ammo cans are dandy for your oils, another for your patches and tips. If you like ice cream on a stick you can shape the sticks into lots of scrapers that won't mar or scrape off any color but are great in the corners and slide rails.
    I'm and old Navy guy and we used CLP (Break-Free) for darn near everything and I still use it on my 9mm TZ and the old .303 and .22's. Never failed me yet.
    Well have fun hope these links help.
    Yours in Service
    James Acerra


    Gun Control is Hitting Your Target
     
  18. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    I enjoy cleaning almost as much as shooting. Cleaning pretty much anything with complex parts whether it's electronic or mechanical is extremely calming to me.

    The first time that I disassemble a new gun I remove and replace a part at a time. That is, I don't strip it completely in one pass but instead remove a part then replace it a few times until I know exactly how that part should look and feel.

    Keep your work area clean. Be diligent in separating your brushes and rods. The first time that you jam a 9mm rod into your .22LR barrel and it gets stuck there will be the last time that it happens (if you learn :D )..

    Read up on your supplies. Some cleaners don't work well with certain finishes. Using the proper cleaner can also minimize wear as you will need less force to get parts clean. Using the wrong cleaner can damage some parts.

    Above all, be safe. In your home it's easy to sit in front of the television and disassemble and clean your firearm. The danger is that you can get so comfortable that you become careless. I'm very strict with myself and others about the maintenance portion of shooting, possibly even stricter than when I'm on the range.
     
  19. nosreme

    nosreme New Member

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    Early in my gun-cleaning career I started having lots of feeding and ejection problems. They ended after an exceptionally good gunsmith gave me a good lecture about breaking out of the break-free mode because all it does it leave a shellac-like residue.

    I kinda enjoy cleaning guns (all mine are semi-automatics) and can't understand the degree of boasting in some other forums about not cleaning until the gun stops working.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2011
  20. JAMESACERRA

    JAMESACERRA New Member

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    To each there own

    Howdy Y'all
    Yes as a Armorer in the Navy we used CLP (Break-Free) on everything from the .45's up to the 5" 38 Naval cannon, as well as tools, wrenchs, pipe and C-clamps. Yes I know some who dislike CLP and have heard the reasons. But I've had no problems with it. I also use Kroil, Rem Oil or Hoppes depending on the order. But it is true you use what you like some are better some are worse. Depends on your use also. For the weekend user that shoots maybe a box or two to the case shooter or competition gunner.
    I've put my TZ-75 thru 500 round testing and had no FTF's.This is with water bucket handy for when it got so hot that the waves made sighting tough I'd douche it off in the bucket and keep rolling.
    I have no problems with any choice, research and experieance will be your guide.
    Hopefully you will not be offended I agree with you, all folks have their tastes.
    Yours in Service
    James Acerra


    Gun Control is HITTING YOUR TARGET
     

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