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Be careful not to get carb cleaner on any plastic or rubber parts. They melt.
It sure will cut the grease, though. A little too volatile to do much for your barrel, IMO
 

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There are only a few areas that really need a lot of attention. The bolt carrier where the gas needs to be sealed, the part of the bolt that the gas rings are on, and the barrel extension. I generally shoot a squirt through the gas tube, although it isn't really needed. As a part of my routine maintenance, I put a new set of gas rings in every time I fire. It really isn't absolutely needed, just gives me peace of mind for a dollar and a few seconds of my time. I know my weapon will fire when needed.
 

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I heard WD40 was bad for firearms. You obviously haven't experienced any problems with it, yes?
Not at this time. I generally spray a little bit on the barrels and then wipe them down taking care not to get any on the timber or plastic.
This is done so that the acid off my skin doesn't leave rusty fingerprints or be a start to surface rust.
Another thing I do every so often is I get a bit of wire and scrape around the edge of the chamber where the bolt face closes up on just to get any crud out like minute bits of brass or burnt powder residue and it makes a difference especially on the .22's.
 

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Not at this time. I generally spray a little bit on the barrels and then wipe them down taking care not to get any on the timber or plastic.
This is done so that the acid off my skin doesn't leave rusty fingerprints or be a start to surface rust.
Another thing I do every so often is I get a bit of wire and scrape around the edge of the chamber where the bolt face closes up on just to get any crud out like minute bits of brass or burnt powder residue and it makes a difference especially on the .22's.
I am really leary about excessive scraping on either DI or piston gas firearms. Might be ok for blowback or bolt action. Dealing with the M16 platform for so many years, over time a wire brush slowly becomes a cylinder hone, wearing surfaces that need to seal gas for cycling purposes. I have seen overly agressive cleaning shorten the life span of barrels and bolt carriers.
 

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Re: WD-40 - why not just use Rem Oil? Cheaper and definitely good for guns. Before I shoot my AR I spray Rem oil all over the bolt and down the bbl and moving parts. Works like a champ, easy to clean up....
WD-40 is specially made to displace water - as in a car's distributor cap. The "WD" stands for "Water Dry" and the "40" is the numbered attempt that finally got it right. It really isn't a lubricant, except tangentially.
 

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In hot humid conditions the WD40 will not protect weapons. CLP, new issue stuff does not have to be shaken before using, still is adequate for most situations. Nice to have a wash tank for really gummed up M4's etc. Brake cleaner or gun scrubber will wash out a lot of crud fast. I have tried everything out there for weapons protection but now going to mix up some of Ed's Red for cleaning and playing with Mobil 1, ATF, and Hoppe's to keep my AR's, etc., lubed and running.
Jim
 

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...
WD-40 is specially made to displace water - as in a car's distributor cap. The "WD" stands for "Water Dry" and the "40" is the numbered attempt that finally got it right. It really isn't a lubricant, except tangentially.
Actually I believe "WD" stands for "Water Dispersant" as in it displaces water. So as a first step in cleaning a firearm that has been exposed to water, I might consider using WD40 first, followed up by the proper cleaning and lubricating oils.
 

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Actually I believe "WD" stands for "Water Dispersant" as in it displaces water. So as a first step in cleaning a firearm that has been exposed to water, I might consider using WD40 first, followed up by the proper cleaning and lubricating oils.
You are correct, sir. I was using the Florida Cracker word for "dispersant.":D
 

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IMHO more bores have been damaged by over excessive cleaning then by shooting them. A gunsmith friend of mine says the same thing.
I know quite a few NRA highpower shooters who shoot about 5 to 10 matches (88 rounds per match) and only wipe down the bolt and bolt carrier, and wet patch the barrel with hoppes # 9 and then two dry patches.
They thoroughly clean the rifle at the END of the season.
Worked for me.
HTH
Bob
 

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I agree

IMHO more bores have been damaged by over excessive cleaning then by shooting them. A gunsmith friend of mine says the same thing.
I know quite a few NRA highpower shooters who shoot about 5 to 10 matches (88 rounds per match) and only wipe down the bolt and bolt carrier, and wet patch the barrel with hoppes # 9 and then two dry patches.
They thoroughly clean the rifle at the END of the season.
Worked for me.
HTH
Bob
I use the bore foam cleaner then a non brass bristle brush to clean the bore. I find no wear to the bore with the foam cleaner. Then again when I go to the range I only shoot five rounds these days as a way to conserve ammo. If I can't hit where I'm aiming within the first five shots then I have some real concerns. I usually just swab out the barrel and coat it with a thin gun grease until I've shot enough rounds that mandate a good cleaning.
 

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In a word, "Often". This because I'm constantly trying to test the products I retail, as well as the methods with which to use those products. I won't beat the drum for any particular maintenance products. I haven't found any "bad" ones.
 

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I do a through cleaning after every firing....regardless of location. Learned the hard way, when I needed it, it jammed due to living in a high humidity area that caused the dirt to swell.
 

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I drop the BCG in solvent after firing, do a quick spray down of the chamber and gas tube, then when I get back to the house lube everything up and I'm done.
 

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After every shooting session, no exceptions. A clean gun is a happy gun, and happy guns work.
I use hoppes, rem oil, and good ole fashioned elbow grease.
 

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After every shooting session, no exceptions. A clean gun is a happy gun, and happy guns work.
I use hoppes, rem oil, and good ole fashioned elbow grease.
I have found using the lubricant "Slide Glide" that I don't have to clean the gun every time I go to the range but then again with the ammo shortages I only shoot five to ten rounds. I figure if I can't hit where I want within the first five rounds then I'll have some real problems in in a real life threat situation.
 

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I clean my home defense and carry guns every time I shoot them, but will let range or safe guns live with a simple wipe down every few hundred rounds.


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