Gun Bluing?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by alwaysastrategy, May 22, 2007.

  1. alwaysastrategy

    alwaysastrategy New Member

    5
    0
    0
    Is this something you can do yourself? Uh, is this something i should try to do, is a more accurate question. Also, can you do a matte black finnish?
     
  2. RONSERESURPLUS

    RONSERESURPLUS New Member

    662
    0
    0
    Gun Blueing and Finishes?

    Hello always/All


    RON L here = SERESURPLUS




    Gun Blueing, and Finishes, Can ya do them yourself? YUP, Is it a good idea? Not really! First of all, are you willing to strip the gun down to it's smallest componet and then do the blueing then re-assemble? Thats the first Hurtle, then there is the Blueing! Most folks Would have to go the Hot Water Blueing as they Lack the Hot Tanks required to Do Chemical Hot Blueing! Then, To Hot Water Blue, You need a container large enough to submerge all the parts your gonna blue, then heat it up, ALONG WITH A GLASS BOTTLE LARGE enough to hold the Blueing your gonna use? Next, clean all the parts down, so no oil or even finger print residue is on any small or large Piece! Then you put all the parts in the hot water, heat to a rolling boil, take the parts out without touching them and apply the Bluing element and then put back in Hot Water, do this several time till it s 3X darker than you want to finish being then you "card" the finish, tah of scrubbing the new finsih with 4-6 O steel wool, Of course you have to get each mark or ding out, or it will just finish right over them and show up later? Once you've done all that you Rub oil and Blue stopper solution or more oil and card the Finish many more times to polish it up! Then you have the run of Re-assembly many parts will be built up too large and will need a lot of detail work, just so they fit back together? Now, if all that is fun to you or Ya wanna try, GO FOR IT! Not a Smart aleck responce, but from one that has done a Lot of Blueing and parkerizing and it's a lot of work!



    OH then thier is Parkerizing, Care for a GO at Using Acid to Finsh your firearm? If so, ask me I'll detail how that is done as well and Yes, thier are Kits, I used to make my Living on folks that got a kit and the result would me on my desk for work that next monday?? LOL Have a good time, good Luck and Be careful!
     

  3. sudokusteve

    sudokusteve New Member

    2
    0
    0
    Parkerizing tank design

    Hey everyone,
    I am starting a new tank design for parkerizing,so far the first two small jobs went great. I am doing a 7.62 Mauser Broomhandle in this build.I been using new chemicals to the market. I will post pics of the project in stages. Hey Ron, still hanging in there!
     
  4. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

    3,250
    0
    0
    It's not that difficult or expensive ($20), and actually can be quite rewarding. The gunshop method of stainless steel tanks and acid/blueing salts is the best method, but it is not necessary to get a decent job if you are willing to do some careful metal prep. manually. I have done several guns over the years and the worst part is preparation. Steel wool, scotch brite pads, and emery cloth remove the old bluing quite well with a lot of elbow grease, and the bare metal must be thoroughly degreased with Methyl Ethyl Ketone, Acetone, or even Alcohol, and latex gloves worn throughout the process to keep the oils in your skin from contaminating the metal after it has been degreased. Care must be taken with guns that are engraved in order to avoid removing or damaging the engraving. A blueing remover (acid) is advised for engraved guns since it is almost impossible to completely remove the blueing from the engraving. Common sense is necessary to avoid creating scratches which run perpendicular to the metal "grain" (ie. don't use lengthwise strokes on a barrel - use a twisting motion) If the metal is not prepared properly you will get a lousy blotchy job. I have used Birchwood Casey cold bluing solution with much success, but I would place the barreled action in an oven for 10 minutes at low heat (200 degrees) before applying the blueing solution. I would repeat this 3 or 4 times rinsing with water and degreasing between applications to get a rich blue/black appearance. I recently bought a new process made by Wonder Blue and plan on bluing an old Ithaca Mod.37. I have heard excellent reviews with regards to Blue Wonder. Count on spending two days to blue a rifle properly.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2009
  5. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

    21,833
    3
    0
    CAN? YES, YES, YES..[​IMG]

    SHOULD? NO, NO, NO
     
  6. dynastyofnext

    dynastyofnext New Member

    318
    0
    0
    <B>RUGGED GUN BLUE</B>

    I've been messing around with this stuff so when I get my first gun build kit I'll be ready. It works pretty good, only downer is I think Im going to have to blue the inside of the slide aswell.
     
  7. indy_kid

    indy_kid New Member

    87
    0
    0
    Sure, anyone can do it...poorly. A professional look generally takes a pro set-up, a lot of time, and a lot of experience. Oh, and $$$.

    As for matte black, here's what $10 of Krylon can do (vs. $$$ for Lauer DuraCoat):

    [​IMG]

    The benefits of Krylon: inexpensive; easy-to-use; if you mess up, it's easy to take it off when fresh (use some paint thinner & steel wool, then let it dry for a day before trying again). Think shades of dark gray & black vs. pure black; helps to hide scuffs, etc.
     
  8. 7.62 Man

    7.62 Man New Member

    904
    0
    0


    There is a trick to doing cold blue.
    To coat evenly without streaks’ or needing buy a large amount of blue to dip, get some 2 or 3 gal. Zip-lock bags & put parts in the bag with about 3 or 4 oz. of cold blue solutition. Then shake (rotating as you go) if you need it darker or want it to go faster heat the parts first. Just hot to the touch (but don't touch it with bare hands) about 150 to 180 deg. To do long barrels you can get vac-u-seal bags the type that comes on a roll, so you can cut just the right size bag. Remember to plug the ends of the barrel to keep the blue out of the inside of the barrel.
     
  9. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

    3,250
    0
    0
    Most cold bluing solutions are sold in 2 to 4oz bottles....they are meant to be applied by hand, not dipping. Additionally, to buy enough to "dip" would cost you more than having a gunsmith do the job for you! Imperfections are not cured by "dipping", they are cured by removing oil and old finish from the metal. Any metal that is completely clean and degreased will look perfect after cold bluing - but this is easier said than done.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2009
  10. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    4
    0
    The best cold blue on the market is opxpho-blue from Brownells. I have seen a few guns done by that and you couldn't tell they were cold blued at all.

    99% of your finished product for bluing and stock finishing is in the prep work. If you do not prep your metal and wood right it is going to look like crapola. The more time you spend making sure the metal as close to perfect as you can will be money in the bank. It will make the end product look good and save you time in the long run.

    If you don't want the hassle of cold blue look into Duracoat or some of the other spray on finishes out there. Krylon is ok but it will chip and scratch easy then get some sweets on it and watch it melt away.

    I have done some krylon rebluing jobs on some guns and they look great until you need to use them or look at them cross eyed.

    I am looking at a complete refinish on an old 22lr right now I am stripping the stock. I am two weeks into it and I am still not done sanding the stock. It may not take me as long to strip the metal as I am going to see if I can't use a buddies blasting cabinet to do it. Pending on how the action and reciever look in the white will determine if I am going to blue it or dura coat it.

    Here is a krylon job on my beater stock for my varmint rifle. I know not metal work but it just to show you that you can get a decent looking finish if you take your time.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2009
  11. 7.62 Man

    7.62 Man New Member

    904
    0
    0
    For the metal parts on the gun I like using a bake on paint insted of krylon that comes off with hand sweat.
    I did a Polish Tantal with VTH engine enamel black satin & baked it at 200deg. for 30 min. This coating is so tuff I scrubed it with acetone & it didn't budge. It is chemical resistant & can take up to 550deg. It comes in a lot of colors from flats to glosses & metallic.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    VHT Engine Enamel™