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Okay guys, my son is finally walking and my wife and I have started discussing where to keep our home defense gun. Currently it is on the top shelf in the closet where he can not reach but with his curiosity growing we would like to purchase a safe of some kind. Any suggestions from parents or gun owners on what to get or do? Do we get a key safe or combination safe?:confused:
 

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The best you can afford! Keyed can be had for as little as $30. I bought a model that can be combination or biometric for $100 or $120 I can't remember. It's about 11×14.

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jcd390 said:
Okay guys, my son is finally walking and my wife and I have started discussing where to keep our home defense gun. Currently it is on the top shelf in the closet where he can not reach but with his curiosity growing we would like to purchase a safe of some kind. Any suggestions from parents or gun owners on what to get or do? Do we get a key safe or combination safe?:confused:
The safe I use is a key pad that I purchased at Sportsmans. The safe is large enough to hold four large handguns.
 

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I bought a small drawer safe from sportsmans for around $50. It's perfect for my home defense gun. Has a combination lock and also a hidden key access.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My biggest concern about a safe is my wife trying to open a combination lock or key access during an actual breakin. Anyone else have this same concern?
 

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jcd390 said:
My biggest concern about a safe is my wife trying to open a combination lock or key access during an actual breakin. Anyone else have this same concern?
It only takes about a second and a half to punch in the key code.
 

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You are correct. No point having a gun locked in the safe at night if you cant get to it should someone break in.

I use a safe during the day for anything I am not carrying. At night I have a hidden holster attached to the bed frame. The bedroom is locked at night and the first thing I do every morning when I get up is put the gun back in the safe unless I am carrying it.

I have thought about getting one of the combination cases that attach to the side of the nightstand just as an added safety measure instead of the holster.
 

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My biggest concern about a safe is my wife trying to open a combination lock or key access during an actual breakin. Anyone else have this same concern?
The biometric (fingerprint) models can be programed with multiple finger prints, and work in the dark.
 

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jcd390 said:
My biggest concern about a safe is my wife trying to open a combination lock or key access during an actual breakin. Anyone else have this same concern?
The advise given as far about these safes are about the best you can do until someone figures out the next best thing. (I like combo safes: keypad) Nothing to worry about though, just show her how to use it, make sure she understands how it works, and practice a few times, she'll be good to go in no time (from personal experience)...
 

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@JCD: I would like to weigh in as I am basically on the same page. My daughter is now a year and half old and exploring everything within her reach. Right now my setup is this:

My main safe is a keypad Stack-On safe thats fairly wide and heavy, capacity for about 10 pistols. It sits hidden on a high shelf in my basement, a place she never goes because its dark and dirty down there.

My other bedside safe is a small keypad safe that sits on the top shelf of my closet, hidden by clothes, about 6 feet from my bed where its virtually impossible for her to climb because there's no way to get up there. Now that she also is walking, I keep the gun inside that safe at when I go to bed, unlocked with the door shut, and never keep a round chambered (its a Glock). I figure as of right now I have these layers of protection that allows me to keep her away from it, but its easily accessed by me if need be. Hope that helps. My system will surely change in the next 1-2 years as she gets older, bigger, and smarter, but for now its perfect for me.
 

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Okay guys, my son is finally walking and my wife and I have started discussing where to keep our home defense gun. Currently it is on the top shelf in the closet where he can not reach but with his curiosity growing we would like to purchase a safe of some kind. Any suggestions from parents or gun owners on what to get or do? Do we get a key safe or combination safe?:confused:
Get a double action pistol/revolver, place a standard paddle lock in the trigger guard BEHIND the trigger and it can't be fired and it is safe to leave it loaded. If you want to go one step further, place an "I" bolt in the bedroom closet and lock the loaded gun there (behind the garments) and keep a key handy (hidden in a pocket at the very end of the closest) and if you hear something go bump in the night and you can be armed in about 10 to 20 seconds. Not to mention it conceals it from burglars.:D
 

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Get a double action pistol/revolver, place a standard paddle lock in the trigger guard BEHIND the trigger and it can't be fired and it is safe to leave it loaded. If you want to go one step further, place an "I" bolt in the bedroom closet and lock the loaded gun there (behind the garments) and keep a key handy (hidden in a pocket at the very end of the closest) and if you hear something go bump in the night and you can be armed in about 10 to 20 seconds. Not to mention it conceals it from burglars.:D
Seems like good advice. Stack on makes a "safe" that sits flush with the wall and can be hidden behind clothes. It has a keyed lock.
 

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I have been teaching this method for securing a loaded gun for MANY years. It is a very inexpensive way to 'kid proof' your guns, but more important is, when they get old enough, is to 'gun proof' your kids!!!;)
 

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I have one of these http://www.gunvault.com/gv2000c-std.html attached to my headboard. I highly recommend that you get the plug-in power supply and use the battery as a back-up (that's what I did). This thing works very well and I can operate it in the dark, once open it has a light inside. Be sure to mount it solidly wherever it is going to live. It is also important to operate it and practice with it while laying in bed as you would be in the middle of the night. I practiced with it for a couple of months before I figured out all of the things I might do in the fog of sleep. Try to open it with your off hand? Doesn't work for me. I am not ambidextrous. I have to use my right hand, which means I have to roll out of bed and sit on the edge to operate it (I sleep on the right hand side of the bed, viewed as I am lying in it).

Since both your wife and you will be relying on the same safe, you may want to put it in the center.

And also heed the advice of others here. Start the gun safety training as soon as your child becomes self-aware and use the Eddie Eagle "Stop. Stay Away. Get an Adult" model until they are ready to start transitioning to the Rules of Firearms Handling in preparation for actually handling firearms.

In our house the boys were trained from Day One to handle all guns, toy or otherwise, just like they would eventually handle real guns. Some people think this is extreme, but it has worked very well for our family. No shooting each other with dart guns or airsof guns, none of that. The closest thing they have done to "playing" with guns was to play laser tag. They have never fired paintballs either, and they don't miss it. They got to use real guns and shoot real bullets instead. Much more fun (those little paintballs make great targets for the .22!).

They were allowed to use water guns and shoot each other, but we always got them the kind that looked like toys, not the ones that look like a colorful plastic firearm.

Just my two cents. YMMV.
 

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Honestly I think the best thing to do is teach him gun safety. I have a 6 year old little sister and if you hand her a firearm the first thing she does is check her self and ask if it's loaded. Her finger has never touched a trigger as she's never fired a weapon, only handled. You will never catch her with the mussel pointed at herself or anyone with a weapon she KNOWS is unloaded and safe. My 13 year old sister is the same way but she has fired every gun I own under close supervision. I feel it's better to teach them and let them ask questions rather than try to find out on their own when your gone
 

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Honestly I think the best thing to do is teach him gun safety. I have a 6 year old little sister and if you hand her a firearm the first thing she does is check her self and ask if it's loaded. Her finger has never touched a trigger as she's never fired a weapon, only handled. You will never catch her with the mussel pointed at herself or anyone with a weapon she KNOWS is unloaded and safe. My 13 year old sister is the same way but she has fired every gun I own under close supervision. I feel it's better to teach them and let them ask questions rather than try to find out on their own when your gone
That is what I said, "Gun proof your kids"!;)
But be very careful if there are 'other' kids who frequent your home as well!!!:eek:
 

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Honestly I think the best thing to do is teach him gun safety. I have a 6 year old little sister and if you hand her a firearm the first thing she does is check her self and ask if it's loaded. Her finger has never touched a trigger as she's never fired a weapon, only handled. You will never catch her with the mussel pointed at herself or anyone with a weapon she KNOWS is unloaded and safe. My 13 year old sister is the same way but she has fired every gun I own under close supervision. I feel it's better to teach them and let them ask questions rather than try to find out on their own when your gone
Both teaching your kids about safe firearms handling and securing your firearms from access by unauthorized persons (including those same children at least until they have been trained in how to shoot them) are both critical practices. Do both.
 
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