Grampa's guns

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Glasshartt, Mar 24, 2010.

  1. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    Ok guys, and gals, since we have the new gun safe, I just got the "family" guns from my dad. 3 rifles and 1 shotty. I don't know if any of them have any value, other than family history. Does anyone have any thoughts?

    The Ithaca dbl bbl, (SN:241***) he found when he was a teen, out in the woods behind his house, in the snow.
     

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  2. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    The Stevens-Savage 30-30 (Model 325-C, no SN) and the 35 Remington (GameMaster Model 141, SN: 290**) were my grandfather's, and dad's, deer rifles. The recoil pad is on the 35 to make it longer. The rifle was too short for my dad.
     

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    Last edited: Mar 24, 2010

  3. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    The Winchester .22 (Model 02, no SN) was my dad's from when he was a kid. It is surprisingly accurate for such a small rifle.
     

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  4. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I'm clueless as to values and scarcity or whatever, but you have a very nice piece of family history there. I'm glad you have them as I know they will be well cared for. :)
     
  5. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    Thanks CA, just hoping to find out a little more about them.
     
  6. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I love to see old guns being passed down thru families. I can't tell you if they have any value but I wouldn't get rid of them.
     
  7. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I have never seen a rifle chambered for .22 "extra long". Did they call the .22 long rifle the "extra long" when first introduced? That may help date the rifle. It might be a very early model and very valuable because of the markings.

    The rest, very nice indeed.
     
  8. Dcomf

    Dcomf New Member

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  9. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    Wow, thanks, I don't think that I would shoot it without getting it checked first. I know that my dad has shot it in the past, but there is some light pitting up near the stock and I wouldn't want to risk it. I did look at some of the serial number lists but I had no idea what model it is.
     
  10. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    Robo, I'm not sure. I don't think that the long and extra long were the same because it mentions both on the barrel markings. I think it may have been made between 1920 and 1930. I found a little info on the web, but not much.
     
  11. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    .22 Extra Long - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    It's wiki, but it has some dates on the .22 "extra long".
    The .22 Extra Long ceased to be offered commercially in 1935.[1]
    Introduced around 1880, the .22 Extra Long was used in Remington, Ballard, Wesson, Stevens, and later (1916) models of Winchester's M1903 and M1904 single shot bolt action rifles,[1] as well as in Smith & Wesson revolvers.[1]
    Thanks, i had never heard of the .22 "extra long".


    Nowhere near new. Nice collection!
     
  12. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    Just got a response from Ithaca. :)

    Dear Linda,


    Your Ithaca double barrel side by side shotgun is a Flues Model, which was built in 1913.



    Here is a little history on the Flues Model:



    The Flues Model

    The Flues Model was introduced in 1906 and remained in production through 1926; it enjoyed the longest production life of any Ithaca double gun. The Flues was built on a three piece lock mechanism designed and patented by Emil Flues. The lock mechanism was comprised of a sear, a hammer with integral cocking arm, and a coil spring. The frame of the Flues model was stronger than that of its predecessors, because the simpler lock mechanism required less metal to be milled from it; making reinforcement around the water table and standing breech no longer necessary.

    The Flues Model was offered in 10, 12, 16, 20 and 28 gauges; and in several different grades beginning with the Field grade and ending with the Sousa Special grade.

    Approximately 223,000 guns were produced between1908 and the end of 1925.

    A Field Grade Flues Model currently in excellent condition is booked price to be worth an estimated $1000; the Sousa Special in excellent condition is listed to be worth and estimated $15000.



    Thank you for contacting

    Ithaca Gun Company

    Patty Cooper

    USA All the Way!!
     
  13. Troy Michalik

    Troy Michalik Is it Friday yet? Supporter

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    Dang girl! VERY nice collection you've got there. We should all be so lucky to be left such a fine assortment of "collectibles" :D
     
  14. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The "long" and the "long rifle" are different animals. The "long rifle" cartridge is longer than the long that's why I thought "extra long" may be the same or very similar to the LR.
     
  15. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    Oh, I didn't know that, thanks.