GP-100 vs M60

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by bleak23, Jan 1, 2011.

  1. bleak23

    bleak23 New Member

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    Thinking about buying one or the other. The GP-100 is 4" while the M60 is 3" with a Hi Viz front site (which seems pretty cool). Both are stainless. This will be my first revolver in a long time. I'm selling my Ruger P95 to get a revolver because I like the simplicity of revolvers. It will be used for target practice and home defense.

    I did a search for M60 but came up empty. I know the GP-100 is pretty well liked around these parts and Ruger customer service is good so I'm wondering what I would be missing if I got the M60. Which gun should I get? Can I put a Hi Viz sight on the Ruger? Are there any other revolvers (in any caliber) I should seriously consider? Thanks.
     
  2. russ

    russ New Member

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    I'm not familiar with the M60, outside of a .30 cal light machine gun. Can you provide more information on it?

    I do, however, have plenty of information on the GP100. I love mine, it's a 6" stainless and one heck of a great revolver for the money. Sure, my sister's S&W 686 is a little smoother and finished a little better, but she paid almost $200 more for it. I am plenty happy with my Ruger.
     

  3. bleak23

    bleak23 New Member

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    You can check out the M60 here.

    The smoothness, fit and finish are the kinds of things I'm wondering about. I don't care about the money. I just want the best revolver for my money. I'd get a Ruger $700 .454 Casull if I thought (or am told) it's the best revolver. :D

    I definitely don't want a lemon. My last gun was a lemon which I had to send back to the manufacturer (Ruger) for repair.
     
  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    if you want the best revolver colt python is the best 357 out there.
     
  5. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    (insert snide comment about having lots of practice here :p)

    S&W is pretty dang hard to beat. It is a smaller frame than the Ruger, a bit easier to conceal, will kick more. It is the son of the Model 36.
     
  6. bleak23

    bleak23 New Member

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    Wow. I wasn't aware that a revolver could cost that much. I guess I should refine my last post to say that I want a revolver for around $650 that I can buy at Bud's. Thanks.

    Nice sig BTW. :D
     
  7. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    The Model 60 is an excellent revolver. However, you don't want to feed it .357's as a steady diet. The frame is a bit light for heavy loads all the time. Practice mostly with .38's and some .357's then carry it with .357 hollowpoints.

    The GP100 will eat .357's all day, every day, long after you pass it down to your grandkids. It's considerably heavier than the Model 60, so if you plan on carrying it, that's a consideration.

    Either way, you won't go wrong. If it's to strictly be a range gun, I think you can have more fun with the GP100 because you can shoot whatever you want in it without a hiccup.

    Happy New Year. :cool:
     
  8. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    Since you're talking about my two favorite wheel guns, ill chime in.

    The GP100 is a great gun, built like a tank. Ive had two 6" and one 4", AND they can be found in a 3".

    The m60 is a better carry option, and running full house loads isn't going to hurt a thing.....except your palm eventually.

    Mine was a 2 1/8" bbl, sweet double pull, with about 1# single. I carried it all the time, but ultimately felt better with 13+1 in my HK compact.
     
  9. hogrider

    hogrider New Member

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    GP100 v M60

    If you are going to use this for target, I'd go with the extra inch and get the GP100. That one inch will make a huge difference. Plus the GP has a proven track record. I'm not familar with the M60.
     
  10. bleak23

    bleak23 New Member

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    Happy New Year to all. And thanks for the replies.

    I just realized something; the M60 is a 5 rounder! :eek:

    So I think I'm going to get the GP-100.

    Is it true that S&W uses MIM (metal injection molding) for parts and Ruger does not? I was reading that in a review for a S&W 686.
     
  11. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    Just a little note-You can buy a GP100 in a 5" barrel too,it's a dealer exclusive,I been looking at one,it looks balanced.
     
  12. mesinge2

    mesinge2 New Member

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    In about 2 weeks I will receive delivery of a rare 5" M60 from many moons ago.
     
  13. bleak23

    bleak23 New Member

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    GP-100 vs 686

    How about the Smith and Wesson 686?

    It is about the same weight of a GP100. It's about $120 more than the GP100. What would I be getting for the extra $?

    If it's a smoother trigger and better finish, I'm all in. If it's just the name, I'll stick with the GP100.
     
  14. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    It's a Smith. They're more refined than the Rugers are. If you're going to buy the 686, see if you can find a 7 round model. (really)

    I personally don't like the newer S&W revolvers with the internal lock.
     
  15. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    Look for a S&W 686+. That's the name for the 7 round model.
     
  16. Moe M.

    Moe M. New Member

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    Depends on what your needs are, You can't buy a better all around wheel gun out of the box than a Smith, and if you can find an older one it's even better.

    There's been a lot of guns mentioned here, and this may not sit well with some folks here, but here goes, Taurus, keep away from them if you are thinking of giving it a lot of use, the metal is soft, especially the internals, case hardening is poor.

    Pythons, what can I say, they are great shooters and look even better, but they are expensive and they go out of time quicker than any other gun on the market, but they ae smoth as silk, any did I mention pretty.

    Rugers, somebody here said they were built like a tank, that's true, they are also very accurate, and easy to disasemble without tools, but they are heavy.
    If you need a hunting handgun, a plinker, or a target revolver, the rugers are a good choice, BUT, if your going to use it for self defense, buy a Smith.
    Now is where some people get cranky.
    I served as a police officer until I retired, also was the dept. armorer and combat firearms instructor for most of those years, and served on the special response team, and we carried ruger revolvers for about six month.
    Why only six months, because that's how long we had them before it was qualification time, every one of the new rugers that we had jamed up under rapid fire over a three day qualification course.
    Ruger sent down a rep. who sent down oe of their gunsmiths, who reworked every one of those guns, with me watching his every move, when he was done he assured the chief and I that they were all fine and ready for service, great I said, lets go to the range and give thema test drive, all but two jamed up, and the two that didn't I made jam in no time flat.
    The guns weren't defective, it's a flaw in Rugers design of their double action revolvers, they never changed the design beause it would mean creating a whole new trigger system, the problem is in the loop style trigger return spring system, the shooter has to let the trigger return fully foward with no pressure on the trigger for the gun to go back into battery, in a rapid fire stress mode the shooter doesn't always do that, your trying to get those shots off as fast as you can to end the threat.
    The Ruger if you don't let the trigger travel fully forward right at the end of it's travel and you pull it again at that exact point, it will lock up the action as tight as if it were welded, and the gun will not fire untill you release the pressure on the trigger and squeeze it off again, in the middle of a fire fight that's a had thing to think about.

    Now, if you want a fool proof, small, well made carry gun, the model 60 S&W is a hard gun to beat, usually, if you can't get yourself out of trouble with five shots, maybe you shouldn't be where your at, carry a speed strip.
    I have one, mine is magna ported, I fived .357 mags out of it once, when I first got it, my advice, don't do it, it hurts.
    I use low recoil high velocity .38 spec. 115grn. JHP self defense loads which I have tested in balistics gell.

    PS- the Smith mod. 686 can be had in 6, 7, and eight shot models, it's an L-framed model, but it's big for a concealed carry gun.
     
  17. Clem

    Clem Member

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    You may have noticed that the S&W Model 60 and Ruger GP100 are somewhat different animals. The M60 is a 5 shot J frame. They typically have 2” and 3” barrels, although there is also a 5” version. The GP100 is the Ruger equivalent of a S&W L frame: 6 shot and built like a tank. I have several examples of both and both are very good, but different. The J frame is a better carry gun; the GP100 is a better range gun.

    Keep life simple: buy both.
     
  18. stevebonning

    stevebonning New Member

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    I've had the GP 100 for a few months and here's my take;

    --heavy gun, keeps recoil down and allows for quicker target reacquisition
    --heavy gun, don't carry now, but carrying it all day might be an issue without a real good holster system
    --heavy gun, shooting one handed drills get fatiguing quickly, but the ordinary guy like me can pick it up with one hand and shoot off 3 shots accurately
    --built like a tank indeed
    --easy to disassemble and clean
    --can shoot all day and eats everything I've fed it
    --strong and reliable, will likely outlive me


    and to answer the second part of the original question, you CAN put a Hi Viz sight on it. I replaced the front sight on mine with a Hi Viz--makes a big difference.
     
  19. diggsbakes

    diggsbakes New Member

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    Not to mention the most over priced along with diminishing supply of parts.

    You could damn near put two Smiths in the safe for the cost of one Python and Smiths are no slouch when it comes to quality, just ask me. :)
     
  20. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    for me if you only gonna have one revolver better be a good one. the python is the only revolver i have :) ive fired quite a few varous ones but ive only ever liked the python.