Got An Arisaka

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by zaitsev44, Jun 28, 2014.

  1. zaitsev44

    zaitsev44 Active Member

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    I can scratch Japan off my WWII powers list now because I just got an Arisaka Type 38 Carbine. I've been wanting one for a while now, but haven't found one that had what I was looking for. After a quick Google search I found out it's a second series Type 38 made between 1933 and 1940, the mum is intact, and it's a Kokura factory rifle. The only downside is the stock has been sporterized (luckily it's the only sporterized part), and stocks are hard to find and cost more than what I got the rifle for. I was told the bore is a little dark, and the rifling is "very evident". I have found that 6.5x50 is hard too come by as well, but I can probably just reload it, although Graf and Sons had it for $16/box but they were sold out. What else should I know about these rifles? What is y'alls opinion? All feedback is appreciated!
     

  2. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Keep it authentic and period specific.


    No offense and none taken
     
  3. zaitsev44

    zaitsev44 Active Member

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    The only thing I'm planning on doing to it is putting it in an original stock. I read somewhere that these don't accept bayonets. I'll then get a period correct sling and cleaning rod. Gonna return her to her original condition.
     
  4. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Great find!!! :D

    Who made it I cant quite see..

    Heres a great site to help you identify your Arisaka: http://oldmilitarymarkings.com/japanese_markings.html

    You do appear to have a actual T38 carbine, not the more common cut down Calvary carbine.
    All Arisakas accept bayonets, its a major part of Japanese training. Its just the standard Type 30 bayonet (Except the type 44 has a folding one)

    Be prepared to pay big bucks if you want authentic parts. I paid $300 for my stock with hardware and went with a aftermarket sling and cleaning rod. A real cleaning rod is $100+, and slings are worth more than the rifles are. :eek: Numrich has repro stocks for $150, my cleaning rod and sling were $20 each off ebay.

    Heres a couple pics of my T38 carbine:
     

    Attached Files:

  5. zaitsev44

    zaitsev44 Active Member

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    I looked on Fleabay and saw a stock for $88 and free shipping but it had a few days left, I'll have to give it a more thorough look later. I saw a T38 carbine accessory kit on Gunbroker and it had a sling, cleaning rod, and muzzle protector (all repros) for $45 IIRC. I see tables of Arisaka bayonets at gunshows around here, so that wouldn't be a difficult find.
     
  6. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Is it a actual carbine stock? True carbine stocks brings some bucks, Its definitly worth it to get all the hardware too, piece by piece will be expensive.
    Do you know who made your T38? Yours looks nice enough to hold out and get one by the correct arsenal and type.
     
  7. zaitsev44

    zaitsev44 Active Member

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    I think Kokura made it, I looked on that site you recommended as we were negotiating and I know it's a second series T38 Carbine and only one factory made them for the second series. Kokura from 1933-1940. The one on eBay didn't have all the hardware IIRC. The description said it was a carbine stock, the seller was parting out 5 Arisakas. I'll check eBay again to make sure.
     
  8. zaitsev44

    zaitsev44 Active Member

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  9. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    You need one with a flat buttplate like in the pic, not a cupped one like in the auction.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. zaitsev44

    zaitsev44 Active Member

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    I'll be checking eBay, GunBroker, forums, ect regularly for an original stock. Hopefully a Kokura one.
     
  11. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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  12. zaitsev44

    zaitsev44 Active Member

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    I got the rifle in the mail the other day. It was very cool having it waiting on the front doorstep! I'm happy with it. It's all matching except for the bolt, its a complete mismatch. The stock is actually pretty good looking in person for being a sporter stock. The finish on the barreled receiver is very nice, it's odd because the finish on the floor plate is nearly in the white but it matches the rifle. The bore looks 10 times better after I gave it a good cleaning, there's a slight bit of darkness in the grooves, but it's barely noticeable. The bolt operation is horrendous though, very stiff and gritty. Maybe it's because the bolts were matched to their rifles and this one is a total m/m, I cleaned the bolt and scrubbed the chamber to no avail. One negative thing is that whoever put the Boyds stock on ground down the rear action screw to be flush with the action, so that's going to need to be purchased before I find the correct stock. The mum is full and complete. It is a second series Kokura, the Kokura marking was below the woodline, so that puts this rifles year of manufacture from 1933-1940. Any advice? It is appreciated as always!
     
  13. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Nice rifle Zaitsev. That intact mum makes me a little jealous (yours too trez ;)) When you find a factory stock, let me know if you want to sell that sporter stock. I just might be interested in it.

    I say stick with the internet searches for the parts you need, research the history of your rifle, and do what i have been doing. go to the gun shows on the weekends, and look for hidden treasures. Doing so led to me finding a bayonet for an 1893 mauser rifle. my problem is that I need the one for a 1916 Guardia Civil which is about 9 inches longer. So close, yet so far away........ :D

    As you come up with Arisaka questions, ask Trez or Nitestalker. They haven't steered me wrong when I've needed to learn more on these rifles.

    For now, get the ammo, Norma and hornady make it only once a year from what I have seen, and it is only a small amount when they do. Look into a Type 99, you can fire form .30-06 and 7.92 Mauser brass to fire it out of the 7.7 mm chamber, and keep your eyes open for 6.5 ammo. when you see it in stock, order it.

    For now, enjoy the hunt, and good luck.
     
  14. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Mismatched bolts on T38's isnt uncommon. But it shouldnt be gritty or hard to operate.
     
  15. zaitsev44

    zaitsev44 Active Member

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    It's stiff, that last little but to close it you have to give it a good push. And to pull the bolt back it takes a good pull. I'll give it a better cleaning once I get the correct cleaning supplies.
     
  16. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    It appears you do have a carbine bolt (or at least the safety) Make sure the bolt is assembled correctly and there isnt any crud you missed.

    It should be easier to operate than a Mosin bolt! :p
     
  17. zaitsev44

    zaitsev44 Active Member

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    None of the bolt parts match. I'll go back and clean it again. There was a little bit of grease and gunk in the safety knob that I couldn't get at the time. I watched a few YouTube videos to make sure I reassembled it right.
    This one here is a lot worse than my Mosin:p