Good news for Georgia

Discussion in 'Firearm's Industry' started by IowaShooter, Apr 15, 2018.

  1. IowaShooter

    IowaShooter Well-Known Member Supporter

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    MisterMcCool likes this.
  2. Greg_r

    Greg_r Well-Known Member

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    Just maybe I will change my mind and buy a Taurus again.
     
    Ross82 likes this.

  3. Ross82

    Ross82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm looking forward to handling the new Taurus T series semi autos
     
  4. Greg_r

    Greg_r Well-Known Member

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    The TH interests me. If they make it in Georgia I might be persuaded.

    I have a Ruger American Compact, I want a full size Ruger American to go with it. It's probably the way I will go.
     
  5. Ross82

    Ross82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I probably won't buy a Taurus, but I am looking at Ruger American compact, S&W m&p compact or Ruger security 9...... how do you like your Ruger American Greg_r?
     
  6. Greg_r

    Greg_r Well-Known Member

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    I like it a lot. Love the trigger. Not as good as the1911, but the next best thing. I compared it to the new Ruger Security 9. The American is the better pistol, and the Security 9 ain't bad!

    The American has the stainless barrel, the Security 9 is chrome moly. The safety on the Security 9 is small, hard to manipulate and pivots from the wrong end. I have the Pro version sans the safety, but the standard American has a nice safety. The American has steel Novak sights, the Security 9 has plastic sights.

    I like the Security-9 and would be interested if it came in a pro version, but the American is worth the extra coin.
     
  7. Ross82

    Ross82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yeah, I was thinking the American would hold up better
     
  8. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The CNC machines that make guns now days have no nationality. A machine works just the same in El Salvador as it does in Texas. The more important point than where it was assembled is who reaps the profits.

    I wonder if Georgia gave away the farm to attract the business. That is not unheard of now days. A good case in point is the up and coming Amazon location. Some of the cities are willing to write off decades of taxes while, at the same time, increasing the number of roads, schools and utilities for the influx of workers. The unlucky, working stiff homeowners in the neighborhood will be paying for Amazon's share holder's dividends. It is a redistribution of the wealth from the working class to the investing class.