good beginner handgun

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by oneida92, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. oneida92

    oneida92 New Member

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    what is a good beginner handgun brand that is reasonably priced? I'm looking for something to buy but I want something good.I'm still kinda new.can anybody help me out?
     
  2. seibert1903

    seibert1903 New Member

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    If you can find a good deal on a used one, I'd go with the Beretta m9 or 92fs. They are very reliable, durable and comfortable.
     

  3. seibert1903

    seibert1903 New Member

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    I also recommend going to a range and renting a few handguns to find one that fits you well.
     
  4. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Welcome to the FTF. If I may suggest that the next time you log in, stop by the "Introductions" area and say "Hi".

    I will always try to steer the beginner to a revolver. Inexpensive, easier to identify shooting and handling problems with, easier to clean, and easier to maintain.

    Sometimes, the ammo is cheaper. I've seen .380 ammo go for over $20 a box, but 2 days ago, I picked up .38Spl for $14.96 at Wally World.
     
  5. ALfiremedic1

    ALfiremedic1 New Member

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    I would recommend a couple different guns, but it always depends on what caliber your looking for. A good beginner .380 that I would recommend is a Bersa. They are small and inexpensive and reliable. If your looking for a 9mm there are alot more options. Smith and Wesson makes some good inexpensive guns as well.

    If your on a budget, start small. Don't spend a ton of money until you know what you like and what your looking for. But go to the range and shoot some different guns and you will get a feel for what you like.
     
  6. oneida92

    oneida92 New Member

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    I tried to find the introductions but I have no idea where to find it
     
  7. oneida92

    oneida92 New Member

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    I found it.sorry for not introducing myself earler
     
  8. shouldazagged

    shouldazagged New Member

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    I'd recommend a good revolver to start with. A Smith & Wesson K-frame like a Model 19 (.357 Magnum/.38 Special, better to start with .38 ammo; discontinued, but a fine piece) or Model 10 (.38 Special and still manufactured). A good used example of either gun is an excellent buy. You can work up from there, unless you just fall in love with the Smiths. Lots of people do.:)
     
  9. gunlinn

    gunlinn New Member

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    Yup, revolver.....
     
  10. USMC-Hat

    USMC-Hat New Member

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    I also recommend a M9. It was the first pistol I ever shot in the military then the first handgun I bought. Diss and ass is very easy, mags are easy to find, it forces you to have good fundamentals which will transfer to other pistols you may buy, and tons of holsters and other goodies to go with it.
     
  11. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Get a 1911-
    You will sooner or later anyway :)
     
  12. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    First of all, I agree with the advice already given about going to a range that rents handguns, and try various makes and models. See what appeals to you. However, generally speaking, I would go middle of the road for a first handgun -- a moderate size handgun in a reasonable caliber -- nothing below .38 special or 9mm. Although the .45 has been my personal favorite for many, many years, I think the .40 caliber would be a good choice. I'm not a fan of the 9mm, but this is probably more of a personal choice.

    I think the best handgun to start out on is a good .357 magnum revolver, such as a Smith & Wesson or Ruger, with a 4 inch barrel. And, remember, you don't have to always shoot .357 in 'em -- I believe that the ability to re-acquire the target for subseqent shots is an important aspect often overlooked in discussing appropriate self defense ammunition, and in a light frame or snubby .357 shooting 38 plus P might be a better overall option. The option of being able to shoot a wide range of ammo, from light .38 special target loads to hot Buffalo Bore .357 hunting rounds make, imo, the .357 the most versitile handgun around.

    With common sense considerations in mind, try out as many types as you can, and pick the one that "sings" to you.

    I
     
  13. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    Shhhhh! 1911's are an addiction, and nobody's happy with just one. Don't get him hooked so soon.
     
  14. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    Can't go wrong with a Smith K frame.
     
  15. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    The 1st one shud be free :D
     
  16. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    Out of the box 1911's are, generally speaking, much better today than they were a few years ago. Used to be you bought a 1911 then took out all the factory insides and replaced them with better quality after market parts. Colts used to be some of the worst -- the hammer/sear surfaces were rough. These days you can get a pretty decent 1911 without doing a lot of alterations . . . but . . .

    a property tuned 1911 with a trigger with no creep and a three pound pull that is as crisp as a glass rod breaking . . . that, my friend, will hook you for life, and will be the baseline by which you judge every other handgun.

    1911's are crack.
     
  17. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    K.I.S.S. Start off with a revolver in .22lr or .38 spl./.357 mag. Become properly acquainted with the mechanics, cleaning, safe gun handling and ballistics of your ammo. Once you have become safe, comfortable and proficient with that platform, you may consider moving into semi-autos or other calibers, or may may decide not to.

    Make sure the gun is from a quality manufacturer (S&W, Ruger, etc.) and have a gunsmith check it out, if necessary.

    Your choice of caliber will depend on several factors. Funds available & intended use, are usually the main factors to consider. .22lr is the least expensive ammo, but not suitable for self-defense. .38spl. is one of the lesser expensive ammos and is suitable for self-defense. All ammo is tough to find, in any quantity right now!

    Good luck with your choice! Be safe!! Enjoy shooting it!!!
     
  18. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    If you learn to drive a truck with a automatic trans you may never master a standard ---
     
  19. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    Yo, big Hoss, what was your first sidearm?
     
  20. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    1911 ....Uncle gave me one of his older Colts when i turned 12 - That was 51 yrs ago ;)