Glocks

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by jonesy, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. jonesy

    jonesy New Member

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    Have a glock 19 gen 4 I want it to be as accurate as possible and want it to still be reliable. I have a 3.5 lbs trigger and just put a new sight on. everything else is stock what else do I need.
     
  2. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Have you shot it yet?
     

  3. Gojubrian

    Gojubrian New Member

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    Practice. Practice. Practice.
     
  4. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    "Guns are more accurate than we are". Guns are inherently accurate, but when actually firing them they are only as accurate as the shooter.

    Simply put, practice makes perfect ;).
     
  5. Hackett

    Hackett New Member

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    on a Gen4 19 I'd get a Gen 3 or Lone Wolf Extractor. Glock has had problems with this on the Gen4 19's, and from what I know, only on the 19's. It's a new extractor and for some reason, not working so well on the 19. They are like $8 so not expensive or hard to swap with the right instruction and a 3/32 punch or glock tool.

    Otherwise, nothing, but practice, and a lot of 9mm ammo!
     
  6. jonesy

    jonesy New Member

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    I shoot as often as possible. I'm a marine very bust schedule, but I try. I have the basics down but any tips out there for me
     
  7. Gojubrian

    Gojubrian New Member

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    :confused: What distance are you shooting? What ammo are you using? What do your targets look like now? :confused:
     
  8. jonesy

    jonesy New Member

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    I use FMJ not sure what grain. I shoot at human silhouette on the target vital organ are shown I like to see the damage that could be done I use a standard target to just circles leading to a black top to mark the center. I shoot at about 25m and can normally make a group about a 2.5" spread what can I do technique wise
     
  9. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Borrow a Ransom or other handgun rest (many clubs and ranges have them to borrow or rent), lock the Glock in, fire 4 or 5 five-shot groups. Average these groups together for the gun's "Innate Accuracy" which is how accurate the gun is without human interference.

    The best bet is to start practicing until your accuracy approaches that of your "Innate Accuracy" figures. At that point, any work that will make the trigger and action smoother will help improve your accuracy as well as stepping up to hammer-forged, cryogenic-frozen match barrels fitted to the gun.
     
  10. jonesy

    jonesy New Member

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    Where would I get one of those barrels
     
  11. Mandy

    Mandy New Member

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    Trust me, you don't need nothing else to make it accurate, if you want to shoot lead then get a barrel, Federals are cheap and really good.

    For target shooting get a full size or extended slide model G17 or G17L and then a new barrel will make some difference.

    Internally only the 3.5# connector is all that's needed to increase accuracy out the box.

    some may say strikers and springs, but in reality those will affect your reliability, I know since I got almost all the gizmos for the Glock and have used them all.

    For ergos you may like the extended slide release, Pachmayr grip, if you like the extended mag release (I hate it, would sell mine for $5.00 to anyone), and nite sights, for cleanliness use the Plug.
     
  12. Hackett

    Hackett New Member

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    the only thing that will make a stock gun more accurant is practice and proper technique.

    A lighter trigger, a diff barrel, new sights, all they do is effect how much you take away from the gun's inherent accuracy out of the box.
     
  13. Thadeuce

    Thadeuce New Member

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    Ummm, that depends on the gun. A different barrel can make the gun more accurate. A lighter trigger and different sights have the ability to limit how much your technique affects the accuracy...

    Lighter trigger: Allows you to shoot without as much energy being needed to break the shot thereby allowing you to keep the sights aligned.

    Sights: May allow you to get a better sight picture which definitely helps accuracy.
     
  14. Hackett

    Hackett New Member

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    did you even read what I wrote?

    You said the same thing I did.

    Put the gun on a vice rest. Shoot it 5-10 times without human interference to find it's inherent accuracy then proceed to do the same with new parts.

    As I said before, changing the trigger, grips, sights, etc. only changes the effects of how your human actions effect the inherent accuracy of the gun, and you'd be hard pressed in a Glock to improve on it's out of the box accuracy.

    Yeah, a Storm Lake or LW barrel are better for shooting cast lead, and sure a longer barrel say, putting a 6 inch barrel in a subcompact will give you higher velocity making the gun appear more accurate, but for carry purposes, nothing you add will "Make the Gun itself, more accurate. Again, you are only trying to change how your actions effect the gun's accuracy.

    No human will ever be as accurate as the gun they shoot, you can only practice to get as close to that as possible.

    For me, in a carry glock, I put a 3.5 connector (as it's in all my glocks and what I train with and am used to) and an extended slide lock. I rarely use it at the range, but when doing drills and when in competition I use them a lot to shave time off my mag swaps. That said, I stand by my prior statements about nothing truly improving on a gun's own accuracy, out of the box.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2011
  15. Bighead

    Bighead New Member

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    I think the confusion is that your statement reads like changing the sights, trigger, etc. will make the gun less accurate. After your followup post it is clear that isn't what you meant.

    I'm not sure why we're arguing about mechanical accuracy versus applied accuracy, I might have missed something in a previous post. Yes, the mechanical accuracy of the gun is superior to nearly every shooter's ability, but if modifications impact the shooter's ability to use the firearm proficiently, then they improve the shooter's overall accuracy.

    Beyond the mechanical accuracy issue, I think you're trying to advocate for practice over gadgetry, something I agree with 100%. Knowing how to shoot, and practicing with the gun out of the box will help you exponentially more than hanging gadgets on the gun. Of course, if you already shoot the gun well, and you find a mod that helps you do that easier, it is probably worth the investment.

    For the record, my Glock pistols get a 3.5 lb connector, the Glock factory extended slide stop, and if the gun has the plastic Glock sights I replace those as well. (It's no wonder my Glock 35 was one of my favorite guns, since it came from the factory with the parts I like).