Glock

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by mcclought, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. mcclought

    mcclought New Member

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    How safe is it to carry a glock with one chambered after a 3.5 trigger job
     
  2. chrishiggin29

    chrishiggin29 Member

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    It's just as safe. All my glocks have 3.5 connectors and never had a accidental discharge. It's not goina fire till you pull the trigger
     

  3. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    No problem at all! Although I wounder the real benefit of the 3.5 lb trigger over the 5.5? But whatever! Most good holsters also protect the trigger area from being snagged on anything. That would be the only issue with the trigger even being lighter as well as the standard or NY Trigger! As Chris stated to get the Glock to fire the trigger safety mechanism on the face of the trigger must be depressed as well as the trigger pulled to the rear. Carried one for years on duty when I was working and today for CCW.

    03
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  4. shouldazagged

    shouldazagged New Member

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    If it's a CC self-defense piece, the thought of the 3.5 pound connector terrifies me personally, but that's just my opinion. I no longer own a Glock, but considered having both of mine fitted with the 8 pound "New York" trigger. In the stress of an emergency situation it seemed to me that the more definite a decision to fire was required, the better. I don't even want the option of single-action revolver fire for self defense, so my EDC is a concealed-hammer J-frame. If, God forbid, I have to fire, I want to be very sure it's on purpose.

    Of course YMMV, and I'm sure many knowedgeable people will violently disagree.

    I know, the answer is keeping your finger out of the trigger guard till ready to fire, but adrenalin can be a damn tricky thing.
     
  5. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    I'm sure a lighter trigger makes a difference in competition. I don't see it making a difference hitting somewhere in center mass during a self defense situation.
     
  6. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    While my Glock has the stock 5.5 trigger, I personally don't feel the need to go to the 3.5. So I'll say depending on the training, equipment and maintenance the 3.5 trigger should be every bit as safe as the 5.5. The function is the same with just a lighter pull. If it floats your boat go for it.
     
  7. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It's as safe as a DA revolver. i.e., as safe as you can get in a handgun.

    I have 3.5 lb triggers ion all of my glocks, but IMHO, they are best suited to experienced Glock handlers.

    For a "social work" weapon they aren't needed.
     
  8. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    No matter the trigger , it,s more about your time vested and your safety habits.
     
  9. yogiboobooranger

    yogiboobooranger New Member

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    Shooting competition, I would lean towards the lighter trigger pull. For Personal Protection and conceal carry, leave the stock trigger as it came from the factory. JMHO of course :)
     
  10. Rentacop

    Rentacop New Member

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    Guys-
    Any gun modification you do could be fodder for lawyers if you ever shoot anyone . I would avoid unnecessary modifications but if I thought something would make the gun a lot better, I'd do it and risk the lawyer games .
    Massad Ayoob advises you to use a stock gun for defense .
     
  11. yogiboobooranger

    yogiboobooranger New Member

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    Keep it stock, and your defense is like a rock! Toy with mods and your defense is at odds! Just sayin"

    '
     
  12. Mongo

    Mongo Active Member Supporter

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    If I'm defending my life, the last thing I'm concerned with are lawyers.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2013
  13. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I also follow Massad Ayoob and his legal advice. According to Mas, an attorney will get you on the stand and ask why you created a "Hair Trigger" on your gun. No matter what you say, he will then say this was a modification that gunfighters in the old West used to do so they could kill more quickly and efficiently. That must be what you wanted, to KILL others. And you couldn't WAIT to get into a gunfight and use your hair trigger to KILL someone...ANY one!

    Best is stock. Some say it's okay to increase the pull, thereby making the gun even more safe from accidental discharge and making you look like you were trying to make it as safe as possible. But you should talk to your attorney that would handle your defense and find out what his preference is.
     
  14. Glore

    Glore New Member

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    At what point during a justified shooting would trigger pull weight come into play?
     
  15. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    In court. When the family of the person shot sues you and they use the modified trigger as a case for negligence.
     
  16. Glore

    Glore New Member

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    I dont think thats a valid argument in a "justified shooting". Can someone point to a case in which someone lawfully used a handgun in self defense and lost on the trigger pull weight? That makes no sense. Either you are justified in shooting someone or you aint, no matter how stiff your trigger is.
     
  17. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    You need to keep in mind the general public opinion is you are never justified.
     
  18. Glore

    Glore New Member

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    If a DA decides to make a case against you, you have more explaining to do then the weight of your trigger pull, mainly why did you shoot in the first place.
     
  19. Rentacop

    Rentacop New Member

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    Glore :
    According to Ayoob, gun modifications can be used to predudice the case against you . A proscecutor or lawyer suing you in civil court could paint you as some sort of reckless nut for lightening a trigger or pinning a grip safety... or as a man bent on killing for building your own special ammo .
    I have no first-hand knowlege of this ; only stuff Ayoob wrote and reported .
     
  20. FrontierTCB

    FrontierTCB Active Member

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    While it is possible that a lighter trigger can be used against you in a criminal or civil trial, that can be said about anything.
    Why was your weapon loaded with hollow points?
    Why why did you have a .45 and not a smaller caliber?
    Why didn't you warn your attacker before shooting?
    Why didn't you shoot him in the leg and just wound him like on t.v.?
    Why do you carry a gun in the first place? (Chances are most of the jury doesn't ya know)

    All of these questions can be asked of you BUT they can all be answered completely and intelligently.
    Don't sweat the small stuff.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2013