Glock trigger job

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by 12fretter, Jun 2, 2014.

  1. 12fretter

    12fretter New Member

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    I'm wanting to tackle a trigger job on my new G23. Does anyone have any suggestions for me? This is my everyday carry, so too light is a bad thing. I watched a video on simply polishing the internal parts for a smoother operation and am going to do that today, but if a new spring or assembly is your suggestion, which one do you suggest? Money is limited, so the adjustable trigger assembly for $100+ is out. The $20 spring kit is ok.

    Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    You might want to shoot the gun for a while before you do anything to the trigger assembly. Your Glock has a 5.5 lb trigger pull from the factory. You need to be careful when you polish the parts. If you round off the parts the gun will be unsafe. Just shooting the gun will polish the parts to a degree.

    There are several trigger kits for your Glock they are designed for competition. The factory Glock trigger kit that reduces the trigger pull to 4.5 lb. There are two popular kits to reduce the trigger pull to 3.5 lb. The both claim to shorten the trigger pull and provide a better reset. They are the Glockworx and the Ghost.
     

  3. 12fretter

    12fretter New Member

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    I planned on putting some rounds through it to break it in a bit, and do a bunch of dry firing as well. But if you were to do a trigger job, would this be it:

    EVO

    Also, on the polishing, I would not be using a wire wheel, or anything like that, I would only use a polishing compound and a dremel with a felt tip. Do you see that as a potential problem?

    Thanks for your assistance.
     
  4. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    using anything powered with compound could cause you problems if not careful. it very easy to upset the critical areas if too much material is removed and make the gun unsafe.

    i would suggest taking it to a compentent gunsmith who is well versed in working on Glock trigger assemblies. if this is too costly, then it might be better to leave it as is and be safe.

    the trigger is IMO, the most important component in the safety of a firearm. this is not an area to screw around with unless you know what you are doing. your safey and others epends on that trigger functioning safely at all times.
     
  5. 12fretter

    12fretter New Member

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    I get your point. I'll try and break it in the regular way. Lots of dry firing. I'll also look around locally for a good Glock guy and see what he or they have to say.

    Thanks for the advice.
     
  6. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    One of the best trigger jobs for a Glock is to get a 1911.
     
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  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    you're welcome. i tend to err on the side of caution when it comes to trigger jobs and trigger mods.

    also, look at it from this point of view, if using the pistol for carry or SD purposes, in the highly unlikely chance you would everuse the gun, at that moment of stress, i doubt you will notice one pound of difference in trigger pull.

    but, yes, buy some snap caps and do lots of dry firing. as JD said, and i agree, just shooting and dry firing alone will polish up the trigger components in itself.
     
  8. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    Google 25 cent trigger job.
     
  9. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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  10. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    Yup--there are people in this world that can screw up a red rubber ball.:)

    For carry guns I usually do a polish job on the connector, trigger bar and
    striker. Round and polish the firing pin safety plunger, and use a
    Glockmeister extra power trigger spring. Everything else stays stock.

    Competition guns get a light firing pin plunger spring, 3.5 lb connector
    (I like Lone Wolf) and a re-drilled trigger bar. With the stock striker
    spring it will be right at 3 lbs, crisp with a positive reset and all safeties
    operational.
     
  11. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    just a question for you.

    is this something you would recommend anyone doing to their Glock or someone who is well versed in working on pistols in general and Glocks specifically?
     
  12. 12fretter

    12fretter New Member

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    There's one in every crowd...
     
  13. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    I would say it is not beyond the ability of the "hobby gunsmith" who takes the
    time to understand the Glock mechanism. Glocks are without a doubt
    the easiest semi-auto pistol to work on, and if you screw something up the
    replacement parts are cheap and readily available. Internally they are
    about two steps simpler than a staple gun. No slam there--I think they
    are a marvel of engineering and manufacturing simplicity. :)
     
  14. therukh

    therukh New Member

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    Minimal Trigger Mod

    For a carry gun I don't do much to my Glocks. Occasionally I polish the internals but for someone new I recommend just using some Never-Seez on the tip of the cruciform (sear) and that's all. Then dry fire and/or shoot it all you want and it will polish itself. Check it often to make sure it doesn't rub off but it stays on well. If you do use some NeverSeez, make sure you only use a tiny bit as it lasts & lasts...a thimble full will last for years.
     
  15. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    Glock trigger jobs have a track record of not living up to the expectations. Including mine. To this day there is no trigger job/replacement for a Glock that everyone knows to be a definite improvement. The 5.5# pull is ideal in a self defense/all purpose Glock. What you gain in the trigger pull (if lighter means better), you may lose in the tactile feedback from trigger reset. But if you must, good luck and good shooting.
     
  16. 12fretter

    12fretter New Member

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    Thanks for all the suggestions and opinions. I think more of the goal is to make the trigger smooth. The gritty and "notched" feeling is what I want to get rid of more than making the trigger a lot easier to pull. In that case, I'm thinking more about polishing the parts a bit to see if that makes any difference at all. I'm still up in the air about it.
     
  17. AR10

    AR10 New Member

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    [​IMG]

    In every forum, usually about once a week, someone starts a 25 cent trigger job thread.

    I have been in the middle of many of these, and it always ends up with people ticked, people mad, and sometimes members banned.

    For the hundreds of people that safely roll through stop signs, there are a hand full of folks that get t-boned.

    The safe side of the argument, is no not polish anything inside a gun. Ever. This is Armorer / Gunsmith territory.

    The free spirited side of the coin says, go ahead, buy a dremel tool, and go to town.

    I say, be safe, not sorry.

    Here is what it can look like if something goes wrong

    [​IMG]
     
  18. AR10

    AR10 New Member

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  19. AR10

    AR10 New Member

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    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MawzcjM5dYc[/ame]
     
  20. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think in a situation that you need to use your firearm for self defence I doubt that most would notice if the trigger was 2 lbs or 20 lbs. there is also the possibility that if someone has a N/D and someone gets hurt, the fact that the trigger has being modified could go against the firearm owner.