Glock Shooting Left Problem/Confusion

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by jfinch2377, May 7, 2014.

  1. jfinch2377

    jfinch2377 New Member

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    ImageUploadedByFirearms Talk1399506219.498897.jpg ImageUploadedByFirearms Talk1399506230.197590.jpg ImageUploadedByFirearms Talk1399506239.721289.jpg

    Someone help! I love the gun but not how I shoot it....right handed at least!


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  2. Eagle1803

    Eagle1803 New Member

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    looks like your l/handed is your dominate and its hard to change that. good shooting
     

  3. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    It causes stress and electrical failures to run from who you are. Life in a closet, keeping your guard 24 hours a day... Come clean. You ARE a left handed shooter! See! Wasn't that easy! We are still going to love you! :D

    I think when you shoot right handed, you might be twisting the gun slightly as you pull the trigger. It does not happen with your left hand, because your grip is slightly different, perhaps not as tense, or in some other way.

    Try to relax your dominant wrist slightly, and be sure you pull with your trigger finger only, without squeezing the grip harder. Our fingers naturally tend to flex in unison, an instinsctive grabbing motion.
     
  4. jfinch2377

    jfinch2377 New Member

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    I'm right handed! Write, throw, bat, shoot, etc! I really don't want to change 27 years into it to shoot one particular handgun! I'll try the grip strength suggestion next time out. I shot nearly 250 rounds of frustration this evening!


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  5. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    The first part was a pun, thus the :D You are right handed, all you have to do is eliminate the unnecessary motion, "calm down" your stronger hand.
     
  6. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    GLOCKS do that... It's "inherent" you'll get used to it. ;)

    Tack
     
  7. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    You have to use a proper grip with a Glock. You should be holding 70% of the weight of the gun with your off hand and 30% of the weight of the gun with your strong hand. A proper grip is even more important with a Glock due to their low center of gravity and heavy slide.

    Another issue people have with Glocks is the sights. The rear sight has a narrow slot so you can't have an even amount of daylight on each side of the front sight.

    Maybe a chat with a qualified shooting instructor will help you determine if you need to modify your grip or get a set of sights that suit your shooting style.

    I don't like sights that I have to cover the target. I replaced the front sight on my Glock with a smaller sight. You can find front night sights on eBay for $35 plus $11 for a Glock front sight driver.
     
  8. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    If GLOCK = Perfection... They why do they require a "special" grip and "extra" instruction? :confused:

     
  9. kryptar19

    kryptar19 New Member

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    Yep... Glocks tend to "Roll" in the hand. I'm pretty sure it has to do with the grip angle.
     
  10. therukh

    therukh New Member

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    Left-leaning G's

    I've been frustrated with some of my G's for shooting left and I have tried lots of things to try to correct it. What I've found that works 100% of the time is to get rid of it and get another one. If you find one that shoots to the sights, keep it. I've done this now for years and it works great. I had a Gen 2 G22 & a Gen 3 G27 that shot like champs - exactly to the sights. I made the mistake of letting them go with I got rid of all my .40's. I got a G17 & a G26 to replace them and they both shot left. The G17 was within sight drifting correction but the G26, even after being sent back to Glock was beyond adjustment, so it went down the road. My G36 shot to the sights - when it would shoot at all so I traded it for my G30. The G30 shoots exactly to the sights...no adjustment needed. The list goes on...so my own personal rule is to keep them from now on if they shoot to the sights, shed them if they are beyond acceptable windage adjustment.
     
  11. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    That is not a special grip or instruction. That is the proper way to grip any handgun unless you are shooting with one hand. If you have a poor grip a Glock will force you to correct it.

    The reason you want a 70/30 grip is your strong hand doesn't have to do much but squeeze the trigger. If your strong hand is holding to much of the gun you will push the muzzle over when you squeeze the trigger.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2014
  12. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    and how are you judging or determining 70% with one hand and 30% with the other?
     
  13. kryptar19

    kryptar19 New Member

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    I think the perfect solution to this problem is to sell the Glock and get an M&P. :cool::D
     
  14. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    If you grip the pistol with your off hand with about the same force that you would hold a hammer you will have a 70/30 grip.

    Here is an article by a pair of grand master shooters. They advocate a 60/40 grip. But their techniques are the same. The off hand is doing most of the work holding the gun. If you read an article by other master shooters they will advocate 70/30. It is not an exact science.

    http://www.handgunsmag.com/2007/05/08/the-combat-grip/
     
  15. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    Wow. I see no issue at all being able to shoot well weak-hand. I would start practicing that with all of my other guns too. Seriously. If the other guns make you shoot a little off to one side then perhaps you learn something?

    Might as well make lemonade. :)
     
  16. jfinch2377

    jfinch2377 New Member

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    I will experiment with the grip pressure this evening.

    I agree that it's beneficial to practice with your non-dominant hand, but I'd really like to get it fixed right handed as well. I know that if a home invader is charging up the stairs at night, I'm going to be grabbing the gun with my right hand!


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  17. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    That would be point shooting, a different drill. At a SD distance you won't miss.
     
  18. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    I agree. For home defense you take the longest distance a shot could possibly be taken inside your home and practice at that distance. If you can make a 3 or 4 inch group then you should be fine. If you can do it with your weak hand so much the better.
     
  19. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I came across this video made by a professional shooting instructor. He teaches the isosceles stance. (something I need to work on) He also shows how to grip the glock so it shoots straight. His client was not shooting left...He was shooting all over the target.

    http://youtu.be/rPo_6O4eUAo
     
  20. therukh

    therukh New Member

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    Back in the early 70's, when we first started shooting Combat Pistol, we shot mostly standard exercises. They were all par-time so that we would develop a time sense and be able to do amazing shooting feats in very short amounts of time. Since the score was all points, accuracy was paramount in the time we were given to shoot. Of course, our courses of fire included free-style, strong-hand and weak-hand strings of fire (back then they were 2-handed, right-handed & left-handed). What we learned has bearing on your confusion about your gun shooting to the left free-style. When shooting free-style, with both hands, we would hit the center of the target fine, but when shooting right-handed we would aim slightly right since the gun recoils away from the strongest point of contact with the hand so it would hit a bit left. Similarly, when shooting left-handed, we would aim a bit left and the bullets would print right in the center. I'm convinced your gun is, indeed, shooting to the left and when you shoot it left-handed it prints right on. If the gun shot to point of aim, when you would shoot it at the center of the target, I would expect it to shoot a bit to the right. I know it may sound confusing, but that's exactly what we experienced all the time, and we were shooting 1911 .45 ACP's.