Getting worse

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by greg, May 30, 2010.

  1. greg

    greg New Member

    6
    0
    0
    I recently began getting into handgun shooting. I've shot a couple rounds here and there all my life, but recently began focusing on getting better. Bottom line is I really suck.

    I think my problem is trigger control. To fix this problem I've loaded a magazine with a mix of real rounds and snap caps. This is when I noticed my excessive flinching. I don't know why I do it. I know it's going to kick and go bang but yet I still flinch lol. Any suggestions besides the snap caps?
     
  2. mcramer

    mcramer New Member

    161
    0
    0
    you know its gonna go pop and bang, but you might not know when. thats all i can think of. be sure of your shot, and be confident...meaning dont think every shot is gonna shoot, KNOW every shot is gonna fire.
    i would say fire it slow, and maybe dryfire it and find out where the trigger breaks.

    also the flinching could be caused by you trying to counter the recoil by flinching, or lunging forward. make sure you have a good solid grip. make sure your grip is as high on the barrel axis as possible, without getting slide bite. that will give you more control, and help reduce muzzle flip. your gonna want your recoil to be absorbed by the body.
     

  3. zhuk

    zhuk New Member

    2,031
    0
    0
    I know what you mean, being pretty much a newb myself - I can suck badly sometimes, heh.

    Maybe this might help - as mcramer mentioned, you might be gripping too hard - plus when I started shooting I was told to put 75% of your grip into the NON-dominant hand, your 'trigger' hand ought to be just holding the gun lightly, with the emphasis on gently squeezing the trigger straight back slowly, no jerking...the shot should come as a kind of "surprise" if you see what i mean.

    You might be over-anticipating the shot firing and flinching results. I try to not think about *when* the shot will break, but just focus all my attention on the front sights and where I'm aiming...and the shot just happens while I'm doing that.


    Make any sense at all? I'm sure if it doesn't there are those here with a wealth of experience who can help you out :)
     
  4. RadioActiV

    RadioActiV New Member

    372
    2
    0
    I know I have to get more control over my shooting technique with hand guns. I tend to anticipate the recoil and I pull the gun up and to the left. I would tear the hell out of someones shoulder tho. :D
     
  5. sigp250

    sigp250 New Member

    98
    0
    0
    You are pulling the trigger, a little more, you begin to tense up cause you know it is going to fire, a little more, then finally, bang. By that time you have already flinched. Try accepting the fact that the gun is naturally going to rise. Don't worry about the limp wrist. Let the gun do what it naturally wants to do and you will leave the range after 100 or more rounds without feeling like your wrists are going to fall off. You can work on double taps latter.

    You might also try a DAO 9 mm short trigger pistol 3.2-4" barrel length with no more than 5-6 lb. of trigger pull.

    The right tool for the job can make a huge difference.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2010
  6. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

    4,823
    0
    0
    Muscle memory. It's good to know where in the squeeze of the trigger where it breaks. Many times we anticipate the shot to the point we get overprepared and by the time the hammer drops you have already pulled the muzzle away from the target. A fixed point...A spot on a wall etc makes a great aim point. Dry firing a weapon and teaching yourself exactly where it breaks will take away some of that anxiety. It also shows what happens to the muzzle at the point of the trigger break. It's a little easier to see your mistakes in exercises like this. And practice, practice, practice.
     
  7. greg

    greg New Member

    6
    0
    0
    Thanks for all the help. I'll try some of these things next time I shoot
     
  8. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    A few tips found here...

    ARIZONA CCW PERMIT COURSE - Fundamentals of Pistol Marksmanship

    Also recall seeing a target with the hits marked out to indicate common aiming problems. That would be helpful in diagnosing your issues and helping to correct them. Poor aiming habits are like a hook or a slice in golf, once it gets in muscle memory you can spend a lifetime correcting it.
     
  9. Flat4sti

    Flat4sti New Member

    246
    0
    0
    I dont have anybody to give me shooting lessons and frankly i shoot better than my buddies.

    I am very new also this is what i do.
    *Relax, take a deep breath. Even do a little wiggle thing to loosen you up.
    *Get a good and firm but not a death grip on the gun. Pay attention where your trigger finger is, on the slid start getting into the habit of that!
    *then take aim. the i squeeze back on the trigger until it fires. I think your arms and the gun naturally comes back to the point of your original aim.

    Just take your time and relax relax relax. It comes pretty natural to me. you'll get better with practice.
     
  10. VR4

    VR4 New Member

    104
    0
    0
    Greg, this is what I do. It's called wall drills. I will find a wall with nothing on it and with end of the gun 1 inch away from the wall I cock the hammer and as I'm squeezing the trigger I watch the front sight to see if it moves.

    If it is pulling the sight left or right reevaluate how much of your trigger finger is in the trigger guard and adjust. You should be using the pad of your trigger finger.

    Another thing that can cause this is when you are pulling the trigger you are also squeezing the rest of your strong hand fingers. Learn to move your trigger finger only. Practice wall drills everyday and you will build the muscle memory.
     
  11. John sukey

    John sukey New Member

    13
    0
    0
    I don't have to worry about flinching. The gun sits on a 45 pound tripod and with a 250 round belt, I will hit what I aim at most of the time.;)
     
  12. yumarick

    yumarick New Member

    4
    0
    0
    Greg,
    I teach my students trigger pull with a different method than some use. I have them concentrate during all firing, especially dry firing, on pulling the trigger slowly and smoothly all the way to the mechanical stop, and not think about when it is going to go off. Put a dime on the barrel and do the practice, with the follow-through all the way to the stop, until you can keep it easily balanced. As you pull, you don't ease up on the trigger until you actually feel the resistance of the trigger stop. And yes, depending on caliber and barrel length, you can have issues with not using a strong enough grip or wrist lock.

    Rick
     
  13. sigp250

    sigp250 New Member

    98
    0
    0
    Greg,
    Since 5-30 when you first posted your message, how much have you practiced?

    You have some good suggestions here. Try to apply some of the suggestions next time you practice. See what works best for you.

    Muscle memory is learned by training much like going to the gym on a regular basis.

    Practicing often is important. 50 rounds three times a week is probably going to do more for you than 200 rounds once a month.
     
  14. joshfireart

    joshfireart New Member

    267
    0
    0
    nice topic. practice dose not make perfect. Perfect practice MAKES PERFECT .The wall drill is perfect practice. dont over do your range time because you can build moor bad habits. Shoot close range and build from there. shooting is a HEAD GAME............
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2010
  15. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    I do a similar drill using a cheap, i mean really cheap, laser. I zero it to put the dot right on top of the front sight and point it to an empty wall, after clearing the weapon, loading in a snap cap and dougle checking that the gun is unloaded. When I pull the trigger I look to see how much the dot moves on the wall. The direction of movement helps me diagnose any potential grip or triggering issues similar to the miss chart below:

    [​IMG]
     
  16. ET1

    ET1 New Member

    138
    0
    0
    Trigger control seems to be the hardest thing to master. I started shooting young and quickly learned that I lost my allowance to my brother if I flinched because we bet on everything we did.. I hated watching my brother spend my allowance :eek: and worked for a solid summer to control the kick from my guns. Money is a powerful incentive. Every time you miss the bullseye from 20yards donate a dollar to the NRA. I bet you get better real quick. ;)
     
  17. gatopardo

    gatopardo New Member

    360
    0
    0
    Flinching

    Flinching is a natural nervous response or reflex to an acquired fear.

    How to avoid a flinch while shooting?
    First off the flinch can be timed to the systolic and diastolic cycle, or, the heart beating which understanding is primordial especially for tactical shooters, and is intensified while we inhale or we can relax it when we exhale.

    Control the annoying reflex this way:

    Count mentally and do the following:

    ONE, hold your weapon pointing to the front and down at aprox 45 degrees below your sight level, next to you chest cavity, the trigger finger extended along the barrel.
    (In a real situation, this position keeps an assailant from grabbing your sidearm, while you can use the other hand to deflect any attempt)

    TWO, raise and extend your weapon, present and acquire the target, while inhaling.

    THREE, while you exhale, press the trigger in a deliberate manner.
    If you exhale and didn't fire your weapon inhale again in the same position and while exhaling fire your weapon.

    While you practice this controlled way, something curious happens,
    you'll notice the flinch appears when you are not pressing the trigger, as soon as you present your weapon
    (the trigger finger twitches and the gun moves to either side), which means you are, while exercising this manner, creating a new timing, a healthy one, different of that of the flinching reflex which was "learned" inadvertently.:cool:
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2010
  18. zhuk

    zhuk New Member

    2,031
    0
    0
    Great advice Jpyle...can't wait to finally get my gun in the coming months to give this a go. Can I ask though; what kind of laser are you talking about? I think most except the weakest kind are illegal here (yeah how surprising lol)
     
  19. opaww

    opaww New Member

    4,868
    0
    0
    I use a Walther P22 for trigger control and traget practice to hone skills, and its cheep to shoot. Very little recoil and you get used to it, forgetting about recoil when you shoot your carry pistol.
     
  20. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    Just a standard rail mounted lasersight I got on e-bay for about $20.