Getting minor scratches out of a stainless gun?

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by MrWray, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    I have just recently obtained a slightly used stainless Springfield Loaded 1911, and it has some minor scratches, nothing big but I would just like to clean it up a bit. What is a good way to polish or buff out the scratches?
     
  2. big_blue79

    big_blue79 New Member

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    I use Mother's Mag and Aluminum Wheel Polish. It's what was recommended to me to polish Stainless Steel.
     

  3. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    I use that as well. Use a latex glove instead, dab some on the tip and just rub around and watch the white stuff turn to black. Keep rubbing, the black means you are doing its job. Once this starts to dry, then wipe away with a clean rag, and wipe again and inspect. Easy peasy. (whatever peasy means)
     
  4. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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  5. big_blue79

    big_blue79 New Member

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    I've polished the Feed Ramp and the Slide on my Ruger P345D with it, and have polished a bit on my 469's feed ramp and RIA 1911 with it.
     
  6. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Just don't try it on something like a mossberg mariner that has been clear coated, you will rub the clear matte coat off and then you will have to do the entire gun. :eek:
     
  7. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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  8. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    (done so on purpose)
     
  9. passtime

    passtime New Member

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    I use Happich Simichrome Polish. Usually cost between five and ten bucks for a 50oz. tube. A little goes a long way. I rub it in small circles, wipe it off and repeat until you reach the desired sheen.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    IMO, scratches reflect that my handguns are not a safe queens.

    But to each, their own.
     
  11. Doc3402

    Doc3402 New Member

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    I can almost understand him wanting to get another person's scratches off of his new gun. Almost. To me use marks on a firearm are like use marks on early American furniture. They show character. Holster wear on a barrel, cylinder ring, and cosmetic grip marks all show the tool is being used as it was intended to be.
     
  12. wittmeba

    wittmeba New Member

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    If it is a little more serious than just surface blemishes, try a Dremel with a soft cloth wheel. I have used one to polish my Mauser bolt. Make sure you go with the grain of the stainless brushing. It will make a big difference.

    Like this - use lightly - these are about the size of a dime:
    [​IMG]

    or a buffing wheel with the above wheel polish:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2014
  13. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    That is why I buy used and get them functional.

    Heck, if I put every scratch on all of my guns, I wouldn't have time to.......

    (But there is also the up side to a scratch. You can tell about the time in Vietnam when........)
     
  14. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    Dan and Doc are both correct, it isnt a safe queen, but the scratches were on it when I took possession of it, so I thought if I could give it a good polish and get rid of some of the scratches, why not. I already have some mother Billet polish that I use on my polished billet engine components on my car,and it can also be used on stainless, so I used it.it didnt really make that big of a difference, oh well, like it is said, shows character :)

    1393257632480.jpg
     
  15. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    With a brushed stainless finish you could get away with fine grit wet/dry sand paper (800), use oil, and go with the grain of the original wire brush strokes. That pistol looks more like it may have a blasted matte finish, so the sandpaper trick may not work.
     
  16. wittmeba

    wittmeba New Member

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    Avoid any sanding/brushing around the etching & name/model. It will reduce the contrast if you don't.
     
  17. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    For clarification, if using the sandpaper method to add "brush marks", the key is to only make about 10-15 passes, or just enough to add uniform markings. This is not intended to polish or remove or reshape any metal. There is a good youtube video out there of a guy doing this on a Ruger GP100. In the video he polished the machine marks off of the pistol, and then restored the brushed finish with very light use of wet/dry sandpaper and gun oil.
     
  18. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Here's a link to the video I was talking about.

    [ame="http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nuHGW55UlHo"]http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nuHGW55UlHo[/ame]
     
  19. wittmeba

    wittmeba New Member

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    No argument here - great video.

    I'd still want to be careful. The engraving on the Ruger is much more defined and deeper than the Springfield Armory pistol of the OP. If you zoom the image (right click, view image then press Ctrl and +++) it looks like some of the middle of the word Springfield and part of Armory is almost gone already.

    Cool looking grips.
     
  20. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    All of the engraving is still good, its just the way the light is reflecting, I see where your talking about, it does look pretty worn in the photo