Getting good with single-action revolver

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by maineshooter, Apr 30, 2014.

  1. maineshooter

    maineshooter New Member

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    I have a Colt Frontier Scout .22LR single-action revolver that ended up in my possession after my step-dad died. I thought it would be a good learning revolver to teach my son to shoot a handgun. I think I understand the basics of lining up the front sight with the rear groove, but I'm just plain awful getting any consistency of shot groups on the target from around 25 feet. It is hard for me to get on my son for being way off with his shots when my shots are landing all over the place too. I see the gun waving all over the place as my son is trying to line up a shot, so I think his biggest problem is keeping the gun still before he squeezes the trigger. I'm not sure what my issue is, but I may be moving the gun when I squeeze the trigger too.

    Do most people aim a revolver using the sights, or just learn to point and shoot and not worry too much about hitting a dollar coin size circle at 25 feet as long as it is on the paper and somewhat near the circle?
     
  2. motorcyclenut

    motorcyclenut New Member

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    Practice a little closer and work your way out.

     

  3. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    You don't know what you are doing, and you are passing it on. I mean no disrespect by that. I suggest you and your son enroll in the Basic pistol course offered by a local NRA instructor. Ask at your local LGS and make sure he is certified. This will save time and angst in your father-son time.
    First learn safety, and:
    Yes you need to know how to aim. ;)
     
  4. SB777

    SB777 New Member

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    I'm not an instructor but can tell you what I try to do: concentrate, relax and draw the trigger straight back slowly. I drop the firearm down from firing position if I notice a lot of movement and pause to relax and catch a breath and definitely use the sights for aim while target shooting. With a 22 you don't have much recoil so if you have a lot of movement you may try relaxing your grip.
     
  5. maineshooter

    maineshooter New Member

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    I have thought of doing that. It is hard to prove in a post but I am actually pretty good with a rifle. But I have never had much experience with a handgun. I figured I would use my experience trying to learn as a thread topic. There are probably many websites articles I could read in the meantime. And I'll go through a lot of .22LR ammo practicing which was a pain in the neck to find the 900 rounds I have now and will probably deplete in a couple of months.
     
  6. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    Apples and oranges. Get yourself a gun rest of sorts, sandbag, block of wood...whatever, and shoot from that being careful to watch exactly how and where you aim. One well placed shot, with your awareness to where you aimed will show you exactly what to do from that point on. When I first started shooting, all I had were revolvers. When I bought my first auto, I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn. Then I used a rest and took my time learning how to shoot it. I'm still better with the revolver, but have no problem with the auto(s)
    Practice, practice practice. Every gun is different so your approach to them will have to differ as well. And enjoying the sport with your son is a great thing to do. Just keep thinking positive and keep at it.
     
  7. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    Shoot a few rounds from a sitting rest using sandbags. I'm sure you'll be surprised at how accurate your revolver is. Then you can practice trigger control. Shooting a handgun (for me anyway) is all about trigger control. From a rest position pull the trigger steady and slow...very slow. Get a feel for the trigger. Then move to a standing position using a two hand grip. Taking a class will definitely help. good luck
     
  8. BVAL

    BVAL New Member

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    Yes, get some instruction by all means. They say practice makes perfect, I don't, I state perfect practice makes perfect.
    Here is another hint when shooting single action revolvers. As you stated, y'all are shooting the colt scout, it does not have adjustable sights. Sight alignment as follows,,,,,BURY the front sight into the grooved rear sight that is on top of the frame or receiver. From there you are to focus only on the very top edge of the front sight, the target will be fuzzy or out of focus.
    Remember, you will only see very little of the front sight, this is the starting point to see were the gun wants to shoot to, also known as sight picture vs. point of impact. This must be known before you can make any type of shooter adjustments. Now here is the kicker,,,,,,,, you only have the front sight basically to work with,,,,and it is used for the up/down (elevation) of the shot strings on the target. Seeing a little more front sight means point of impact will be higher on the target. In the cowboy days they would file down or add too the front sight to get this elevation adjustment to their liking. I have even seen some firearms that have had the whole front sight removed, that is because, that is how the gun wanted to shoot to. Shooter would set his eye on the very end of the muzzle.
    Once we have all this under control, how is the time to work on the left/right (windage) part of the shot strings on the target. Some will use what is called Kentucky windage,,,,say the shots are 2 inches to the right on center, they will know to then aim 2 inches to the left of center to put the shot dead center of the target. Some shooters have been known to bend the front sight one way or the other so they don't have to this sight alignment. There are others that will align the front sight to the right or left of the rear sight groove, the out come will be the same. Now there are also handguns that don't have per say adjustable rear sights (up,down,right,left) but the sight is in a slot that you can drift with a punch right or left.
    General Rules of sight adjustments: REAR sight, move in the same direction as the hits on target. If the FRONT sight has adjustment, move the sight in the opposite direction of the hits on the target.
    Hope this will help you out, as I said in the beginning perfect practice makes perfect, if you are just having a bad day out at the range,,,,,things just not going right etc.,,,,,shots hitting all over the place,,,,,,,,stop, call it a day, save your ammo, and wait for a better day to work on these fundamentals. Have fun and please enjoy the shooting sports.
    Here is the key points when adjusting sights: with


    Sent from my iPad using Firearms Talk
     
  9. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    There is nothing like instruction. However, to start. Have a look at Youtube:
    Enter "How to shoot a Pistol" or how to shoot a single action pistol.
    Safety before all else.
     
  10. Alpha1Victor

    Alpha1Victor New Member

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    Just don't try to do anything to fast. You can't be John Wayne in a week.
     
  11. maineshooter

    maineshooter New Member

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    Heh heh. Clint is my favorite. I want to get to the "Get three coffins ready..." skill level.

    Speaking of which, what were his revolvers in the dollars trilogy? There is nothing like the look of the old western revolvers.
     
  12. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    The man with no name carried Colt SAA. Single Action Army.
     
  13. Alpha1Victor

    Alpha1Victor New Member

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    I think we all wish to be that good one day. My grandfather fought in the war with Duke, and they became good friends. My dad has the letters they wrote back and forth during the war. Just an interesting piece of information.
     
  14. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    Your Dad fought in the War with the Duke? Which one? The Duke fought in all major wars from the Allegheny Uprising thru Viet Nam, all on Hollywood sets.

    One of the bones of contention when Wayne performed before the real troops was that he never served in any field of combat. Wasn't real popular on the USO circuit.

    Bob Wright
     
  15. Alpha1Victor

    Alpha1Victor New Member

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    No, not my father. My grandfather knew john Wayne. I said they fought in the war together because the letters between my grandfather and the Duke were always about the war. So I guess I assumed wrong.
     
  16. maineshooter

    maineshooter New Member

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    In fairness to Mr. Wayne, from all accounts he didn't try to avoid serving. Like my grandfather, he was born in 1907 which put him in his mid-30's by the time the war started. My grandfather at 37 was drafted as a clerk. I don't think they were desperate for mid-30's grunts but mostly used men that age to fill clerical and support positions. You want John Wayne fulfilling orders for mess kits, or making patriotic movies during the war? If Jimmy Stewart didn't already have a pilot's license when WWII began, I'm not sure if he would have served as he did.
     
  17. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Mainshooter

    First of all the advice about getting a table or bench and using a sandbag for support will assist in finding where the correct hold is on the sights. Keep in mind the Colt Revolver you are speaking about is no target gun. It was designed for just shooting and having a good time plinking, and shooting at other targets. If you want a precise pistol I would recommend in the future getting a semi auto like a Ruger 22 Target Model, S&W Target Model or Browning Buckmark type pistol. Honestly it would be a better pistol for your son to learn to shoot. Keeping in mind as you if he is not accurate with his shots and confident in the pistol he may lose interest very quickly like most kids do with anything they are not accomplishing what they want or having fun. So use caution. I personally find the western style pistols harder to shoot due to the action and the the grip angle and feel. But that is not true with everyone. But if that were to be the case it might be harder for him to learn with this particular weapon? However the Colt you have is a nice revolver! And you should have a lot of fun with it!

    03
     
  18. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    Don't underestimate the accuracy of those little Colt Frontier Scouts. I had one when they were first introduced, one of the dual-tone guns. It was deadly accurate and accounted for its share of squirrels.

    For the record, I prefer to start a novice on a Single Action since once the shot is fired, another shot is not readily fired without thumb cocking that hammer. So if the shooter does something dumb, there is less chance of a negligent discharge.

    As to Single Action accuracy, my first target revolver was a Ruger Blackhawk Flat Top .357 Magnum, loaded with .38 Specials. Earned a Sharpshooter rating with it in bulls eye competition.

    Even today, some fifty six years and 17,000 rounds later, it still works for me:

    [​IMG]

    Bob Wright
     
  19. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    I hunted squirrels in TN for years with the Ruger Single Six. Damned accurate. Got some good eating.
     
  20. Winchester94

    Winchester94 New Member

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    These guys have pretty much covered everything. You've got a sweet gun and I'm sure you'll get used too it. Once you do, it'll end up being your favorite and you'll want another.... and another. :)
    Care to post a picture of that iron?