general questions about two guns im looking at, value, quirks etc mosin and a stevens

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by greeney, Apr 9, 2013.

  1. greeney

    greeney New Member

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    Friend of mine has a mosin with a cheap scope and a new compoite stock. I don't know anything about them but hear they are a neat thing to pick up and decent acuracy. I found the 7.62x54r.com site so ill look at it again and see what model it is. I know this is vague but what could it be worth. Id say its rifle length like a 22 inch barrel has a front peep ring and a weird sort of mount plate in front of the action. The triggerguard has a triangulare piece coming down to it like a brush guard lol. I assume that affect capacity or something. He hasn't shot it and I didn't look in the barrel yet(don't know how to take the bolt out) but did notice the bolt sticking out of battery on me one time, could just need cleaned and lubed.

    He also has a stevens 200 in .308 with a cheap scope, diy camo job(bad one). Basically a savage 110 but with a flimsy composite stock but it is free floating barrel if you aren't touching the fore end. He hasn't shot that either. He has a lot of guns. So I'm wondering what to offer on either one, hell or both. Thanks guys.
     
  2. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    A butchered Mosin brings just about no money at all. You can buy a new one for low enough money that it's not worth taking a chance on someone's kitchen amateur gunsmithing project.

    A used Steven 200 in .308 should bring a hair over $200 in reasonable condition. Crappy camo job does little to value. A can or two of Alumahyde fixes anything he might have done.

    What is your use for the gun anyway? Hunting?
     

  3. greeney

    greeney New Member

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    with the mosin and I do not know what may have been done to put the stock on I do not know if its a detailed job. with Stevens I don't know either. I just wanted a bigger caliber than what I already have at home want to do a little bit long range shooting as well as get into some hunting biggerr game, or least have the capability to do so. I don't mean I'm going to turn myself into a thousand yard shooter. Just be able to go out and mess around a little bit. I'm not fabulist with Scopes so that's another reason for some experience
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  4. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    Of the two guns, specialy if hunting is in your future I would take the Stevens but only if it was a great deal. As I mentioned before you can pick up a brand new Stevens for a really good price and it's a nice rifle. Cheap scopes will get you started but the difference between a cheap scope and even a reasonably prices scope like a Redfield or the less expensive Nikon lines in the mid $100 range is night and day. A .308 is a nice all around cartridge suitable for hunting just about any North American game and informal target shooting in a gun like the Stevens. VERY few folks have the inherent capabilities, equipment, training or discipline to be a good 1,000 yard shooters, though from reading some of the posts around here you'd think there is one every 5 feet. :D
     
  5. greeney

    greeney New Member

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    Well I was leaning toward the stevens for practicality, minus the whole .308 shortage, and the mosin for the hell of it. The guy is a friend and said to find out what they are worth and we will talk. So he is trusting me to help us both out. I figured the steven was about 250 but sounds like a gun he knows nothing about, id be alright offering 200. The longest I've shot is 200 yds with 5.56 and a 16 inch barrel, I can do a 4inch group there and I've only done it twice. Basically I assume I'm not terrible but want to practice more and learn more about the system not just grabbing someones gun and squeezing off rounds. Do you know if the stevens can be rebarreled? I just wonder if the barrel is rough can I replace it. Altough I'm not too certain how to tell if the barrel is whooped either. Safe to say I'm still a novice's novice in many regards.
     
  6. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    The Steven's can be easily re-barreled but the chances of a barrel being burned out on a hunting .308 are pretty slim unless it was someone's only gun and they just shot the snot out of it. Very little chance of a rough bore with modern non-corrosive ammo unless the gun is rusty which I assume this one is not. Run a patch through the barrel with solvent and clean it up. If the patch sticks anywhere take a long hard look down the bore to see what's going on. If it's smooth in and out you are good to go.

    But again, I would not worry much about it. The Stevens new is about low to mid $300's and for a used gun I expect to pay about 60-70% of the cost of a new one with the lower amount going to a gun that has been messed with like the one he has with the crappy paint job. For example I will go a little higher on more expensive guns and a lot lower on the less expensive ones. Let's say on the Stevens priced at $200 for $150 more I can get out of the box new so it would not be that desirable to buy used unless it was a screaming good deal. I might go to $225 for a friend. Now for a gun that retails at $1,000 I might go $700-800 if in perfect like new shape and go down from that steeply for any alterations.

    There are about 14 pages of Moisins for sale on GunBroker and most are not moving. That should give you an idea of availability. I'd give him maybe $100 for it mostly because the stock probably cost him about $60. New ones can be had for low-mid $100 all over the place except for the more desirable ones like the Finn guns which go for a bit more IF they are in original configuration which this one is not.
     
  7. greeney

    greeney New Member

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    That's great man. Thank you for your input. I'll go for the Stevens and tell him what I've found on both and maybe grab the mosin sometime for the heck of it. Now to start shopping for 308 ammo!
     
  8. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    Anytime! You made a good call. ;)
     
  9. DFlynt

    DFlynt New Member

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    Take the Stevens, lots of aftermarket support, you can work on it yourself
     
  10. greeney

    greeney New Member

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    Ok Stevens it is. Who can point me in the direction of a decent composite stock? Also any info/links on glass bedding and stiffening a stock would be great. Thanks guys. I'm going to do some more searching too.
     
  11. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    If the drop into the same stocks as Savage I can highly recommend Bell & Carlson.
     
  12. greeney

    greeney New Member

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    From what I've read they use the same stocks. I'll look into that. Any good vendors for them?
     
  13. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    Yep, I've used these guys several times with good results:
    http://www.rifle-accuracy.com/
     
  14. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    I'd give $275 to 300 for both. I would also get to know and shoot the stevens before I replaced the stock. I have a Stevens 200 in 308 and really think it's a lot of gun for what I paid for it new. The barrel is easily changed but shouldnt need it if you are using it to hunt with. It is a rather lite barrel and heats up with multiple shots which affects the accuracy but the first 3 rounds fired rapidly will almost be one hole, after that the group opens up slightly. Great hunting rifle. The Mosin in good shape is worth $100, With the original stock thrown in not more than $150 unless it is a more desireable model. The bore is the primary concern. If the barrel has been cut down I wouldnt buy it. It is a $50 parts gun, maybe.
     
  15. greeney

    greeney New Member

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    I am going to get the stevens first. I won't replace the stock right away. I don't want to spend that much anyhow. I was hoping for a basic black composite for 100 or less. The front end of the stock is flimsy that's really my only concern I would like to mount a bipod later, or earlier, and I figure it moves to much for that. What range were you holing three, Teed?
     
  16. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    You can stiffen up the stock by epoxying a metal rod under the barrel channel. Sometimes just fiberglass. In answer to your Question "100" yds.
     
  17. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    I have done a few stocks for friend and used epoxied old carbon or aluminium arrow shafts to stiffen a little without adding a lot of weight. Too muchh work though. Easier to just use the rifle as is and accept the limitations until you have the money for a stock upgrade.
     
  18. greeney

    greeney New Member

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    I am sure ill get done and say it wasn't worth it but I may give it a try. I have a few old arrow shafts. I thought even fiberglass would work, what resin did you use? A fiberglass resi with a glass reinforcement would be sweet id think, like fiber mesh in concrete.
     
  19. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    Normally I use Acraglass from Brownells but for this project just about any 2 part liquid or putty type epoxy will do. One thing to remember, epoxy has a tough time sticking to most plastics long term so give it all the help you can. Roughen up the inside of the barrel channel and create some mechanical bonds by cutting groves etc into the plastic with a Dremmel. The more places the epoxy can ooze into and hang on to, the better off you are.

    When you are done tape up the recoil pad, rough up the outside of the stock with coarse steel wool or fine sandpaper and go over the whole stock with alcohol or windex (you want no dust, oil or grease on the stock) and give it a few light coats of Alumahyde (Also Brownells) in your favorite color. I like Coyote, Dark Eart or Foliage Green. Remove the crappy camo paint from the metal with acetone and use Alumahyde flat black to paint it. You'll end up with a very nice professional looking finish on a MUCH better looking gun and the total cost will be under $40.

    Oh while you are at it, take the recoil pad off completely and fill the hollow inside with spray urethane foam and let it set before you reinstall the pad. That will take away that annoying hollow sound.