Functional accuracy.

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by Shooter girl, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. Shooter girl

    Shooter girl New Member

    319
    0
    0
    We have all heard it. Functional accuracy all but vanishes when we are stressed.

    If I have seen it once I have seen it a thousand times. Some guy or girl at the range steady plinking targets, perfect stance, never drawing from their concealed holster. Just burning off ammo, and thinking it is going to help them during their moment of truth.

    Hopefully that day never comes for anyone. But if it does we, as responsible gun owners, need to train like that day could come soon.

    Yes, plinking targets at the range is better than letting that gun sit in your drawer while you think about practicing, and yes drawing from your holster and going through drills is better than just plinking targets. But it is always a good idea to occasionally stress your body, and shoot tired, heart racing, muscles aching, because we can not accurately recreate the emotions or physical stresses one encounters during a defensive shooting, so we do the next best thing. We wear ourselves out, then shoot our course of fire.

    The below picture was taken just doing normal drills. Three rounds from the concealed holster at 15 yards in under four seconds, and four rounds from the concealed holster in under five seconds. I didn't do any failure to stop drills or anything special like that. Just easy basic drills, using the sights. Not point shooting.
    [​IMG]

    Then I went and drank a couple coffees, went out back and did suicides for about ten minutes, Did two sets of pyramid pull ups and did push ups till I couldn't do them any more. Went right back inside and did the same course of fire, with the same pistol, and the same number of rounds.
    [​IMG]

    Still not too shabby. But as we can see, it was no where near as good as doing it fresh, so just imagine what those groups would be like if I was actually stressed because I thought someone was going to kill me.

    Practice practice practice.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2009
  2. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

    8,358
    4
    0
    Great post SG and spot on for truth. :)

    Just a point of reference of major organ and soft tissue damage suggestions, FFR, for everyone and not criticism.

    If you purposely bring your aim up just a tad as you draw, point and shoot, you will not only hit center mass, heart and lung area, but as you continue to fire, you will put rounds in and tear out the upper lobes of his lungs and bronchial tree, take out the BG's aortic arch and puncture/sever his trachea, besides major soft tissue damage to his major blood vessels, vena cava and neck carotid and jugular veins. That does not include a head shot. Hit any of these systems.....he will indeed slow down. ;)

    Again, good shooting and information SG, and Physical Training is indeed important and mighty fine. Hooahh! :D

    Jack
     

  3. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

    8,411
    3
    0
    Well, guess the liver and onions for breakfast will have to go in the trash! Thanks EVEN, needed to loose a little weight anyway!! :D
     
  4. Shooter girl

    Shooter girl New Member

    319
    0
    0
    Thank you very much, and you are correct. That is one thing I don't like about these cheap targets. They get you to focus on the red instead of where you should be shooting (I am guilty of it). Do it enough and it becomes habit. But the other targets are twice as expensive., they even have some that are supposed to be anatomical, with outlines of the lungs and other major organs. But those are three times as expensive.

    I think I might just start collecting cardboard and making my own.
     
  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

    23,972
    1
    0
    Really good shooting!

    Excellent post and some really good points there. Being able to hit a man sized target when under duress is a definite must if you are going to carry a weapon or plan on using that weapon at ANY point in your life.

    Practice like you would have to fight, and that includes practicing shooting and reloading with one hand. Because you never know.

    Plus 1 on this thread.

    JD
     
  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

    19,847
    3
    0
    Excellent points and well made. Thanks SG.
     
  7. Shooter girl

    Shooter girl New Member

    319
    0
    0
    Thanks guys.

    Something one of the guys at the range suggested to my sister and I today is loading each others mags. That way when the gun runs dry it is a surprise, and also occasionally have whoever is not shooting tell you that you had a missfire and attempt to clear it and finish the drill.
     
  8. Dzscubie

    Dzscubie New Member

    2,508
    0
    0
    Great post SG, here is a little tid bit I use with my officers. When you or your sister load each others mags slip in a dummy round every now and then. When your weapon goes click whey you think it will go bang will start your heart pumping also, rember Tap, Rack and reengage. Again great post.
     
  9. Shooter girl

    Shooter girl New Member

    319
    0
    0
    That is a good idea. Thanks.

    Would simply loading a round with a bullet, spent primer and no powder be advisable?

    Also, would loading a round intentionally out of specs, no powder or primer, so it does not chamber properly be a problem for the gun?
     
  10. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

    21,833
    2
    0
    Use snap caps, and watch for muzzle movement when it doesn't go bang. Movement = trigger jerk!

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

    23,972
    1
    0
    I routinely load a snap cap in magazines for shooters that are shooting with me for the first few times, just to show them how much they are anticipating the recoil. It's an invaluable tool.

    I have loaded spent brass before and it always seems to throw the shooter off. I have never had any damage or issue. Usually the spent brass will not clear the mag and causes a follow up.

    Rarely do I do a quick action drill with a new, inexperienced shooter though. I have them set the weapon down so we can look at the issue together and explain what happened and why. Then down the line we go into reactions and what to do.

    Realistic training is the best training and you can never do too much in my opinion. Even dry fire practice, done correctly, can get you to a whole new level of confident in the weapon.

    Good stuff.

    JD
     
  12. Wambli

    Wambli New Member

    958
    0
    0
    Nice shooting. Just a thought, you might want to look at IDPA paper targets. They have no strong colors etc just faint scoring areas and are pretty cheap when you buy from Midwayusa.com. I think they come in 50 or 100 packs and are lifesize head/torso. Another neat trick if your range allows it is to drape cheap old/used t-shirts or shirts (I buy them from a Salvation Army store for .25 a piece) over cardboard targets so you don't concentrate on the color centers etc. Great way to learn to shoot COM without scoring guidelines.
     
  13. Shooter girl

    Shooter girl New Member

    319
    0
    0
    How much are we talking about?

    Thanks.
     
  14. Wambli

    Wambli New Member

    958
    0
    0
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2009
  15. Shooter girl

    Shooter girl New Member

    319
    0
    0
  16. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

    8,358
    4
    0
    You can try theses too. I have used these before. They are reasonably priced and the woman in the hostage targets looks like my ex-succubus......so I just shoot them both, no loss there and I gain two target sites. :rolleyes: ;)

    Target Pasters & Silhouette Targets

    Jack
     
  17. Dzscubie

    Dzscubie New Member

    2,508
    0
    0
    I also use snap caps if I have them, if you don't have snap caps you can reload rounds, resixing and seating a bullet and crimping it just don't load powder and I also leave the primer pocket empty just so my firing pin is not hitting anything and it's easy to check which are dummy rounds from loaded rounds. Cost less then buying snap caps too.
     
  18. zhuk

    zhuk New Member

    2,031
    0
    0
    Really worthwhile post, Shooter Girl!


    I can vouch for the importance of practising under adrenalin-charged stress, but just not with firearms :p It's precisely what we do in my krav maga class - you cannot possibly realise how much your fine motor skills degrade and you become very leaden-footed when that full-on adrenalin kicks in, and it's important to train under those circumstances and learn to perform despite that hormonal tumult.


    I could only imagine it would go 100x for firearms defence! :eek:

    (but that's something I will never have to consider)


    As for dummy/snap caps practice, during our compulsory pistol holster course for IPSC the instructors inserted random dummy rounds in our mags prior to the drills so we had to clear them asap on the fly. Good practice, and even better for a defence scenario I would think :)
     
  19. Lindenwood

    Lindenwood New Member

    659
    0
    0
    Great thread. I agree 100% on the dry fire practice. I've been doing a lot of that and it has helped tremendously. Fifty yards into a torso (~10-12") is no problem standing off hand shooting one round every ~1.5 seconds. With the butt of the gun resting on something, that easily extends to 75 yards. I am confident with more practice I could consistently put rounds onto a silhouette at 100 yards at a reasonable pace from a crude support position (pistol's butt on any surface, like a car hood).

    It was a new range and I was with slightly shaker people so I didn't get to do any draw and shoot drills. However I do lots of dry fire practice in those (and yes, with the DA trigger and safety off since thats how I carry), and am pretty sure I can still put rounds where they need to go to at least 10 yards. If I am practicing shooting targets at longer distances, I typically cock the hammer when raising the weapon, so I can get used to readying the pistol for further shots more quickly.

    The reason I do so much long-range shooting and practice is because I don't have a centerfire rifle, so my PT92 is my entire combat armament :p .

    Good thread!