Fully loaded magazine?

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Kelly, May 24, 2008.

  1. Kelly

    Kelly New Member

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    Having a 17 round magazine for my Glock obviously gives me more firepower than a 10 round one.

    However, I have heard that keeping the magazine fully loaded at all times can weaken the spring. Supposedly, this will eventually lead to a gun jam or some other negative consequence. Most likely at the worst possible time.

    Does anyone here have any real experience with this? Is it a real problem? Any recommendations?
     
  2. chorst294

    chorst294 New Member

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    For the last 7 years, I've kept 3 fully loaded Glock 22 magazines on me at work and have yet to have a single problem. Police carry all their mags fully loaded and haven't had problems, you'll be fine.
     

  3. NYPD13

    NYPD13 New Member

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    I Believe This To Be True, But Only Over Extended Periods Of Time. If You Hit The Range Periodically As You Should, The It Shouldn't Be A Problem.
     
  4. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Keeping springs compressed is not good for them. They become "denatured" over time. Will it cause a failure to feed, can't say for sure. Can it cause a failure to feed, yes. It's an individual choice. I have seen firing pin springs weakened to the point where they no longer ignite primers, because the gun was inadvertently left cocked for months. This happened to me with a .22 Mossberg rifle and a friend of mine with his Winchester Mod. 94. Generally it's not a good thing to do, especially with a gun that you will rely on to save your life...
     
  5. Flint Rock

    Flint Rock New Member

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    My dad has had the same, fully loaded, GI magazine in his 45 for at least 40 years. He shoots one box about every two years (he says he doesn't need practice since he has had enough experience shooting at people). That gun, that magazine, all those springs, have not failed him yet. The gun is a Colt 1911 (stamped Property of US Army) that Colt tells us was made in 1916.
    The firing pin spring tension is a non-issue, at rest or fully loaded there is no difference in the pressure on that spring. I suspect RL357 really means the hammer spring. The pressure on that spring is increased if the hammer is cocked back. However, that spring has a good bit of tension on it even when the hammer is down. I suspect that the life expectancy of a cocked hammer spring is shorter than the life of a hammer spring that was not kept in that condition, but I doubt the difference would be significant. The issue to me is more an issue of safety and situational awareness than spring tension.
    All that said, periodic spring replacement should be part of your gun maintance.
     
  6. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    If a magazine spring is not physically damaged/rusted, it can sit compressed for 10's of years with no adverse effects. Remaining compressed will not "wear" a spring nearly as fast as "cycling" a spring, that is to compress, and release it repeatedly.
     
  7. h&k bigdaddydieseldan

    h&k bigdaddydieseldan New Member

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    I agree with Jay 100% :D :cool: :D
     
  8. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    If you want to know the correct answer concerning metal fatigue and tensile strength, ask an engineering professor or student who has had a class in "Strength of Materials". Some people can smoke their whole lives and not get cancer, that doesn't mean smokinmg doesn't cause cancer...
     
  9. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Actually the terminology is "mainspring". On the Winchester lever action it is a leaf spring, and as such is even more vulnerable to failure, and has virtually no tension until the hammer is cocked. On the Mossberg it is also called a mainspring, however it is a coil spring and again has virtually no tension until it is cocked. It was weakened so much from being left cocked for almost a year that I had to disassemble it and stretch it out to get enough force to set off the .22 ammo. That spring is ruined and must be replaced - not a simple task for a 35+ yr. old rifle where parts are no longer available from Mossberg. I would advise anyone in posession of an old or antique gun to take care not to leave it cocked. 1911 parts are a dime a dozen and are available frommany sources. Magazine springs may be a bit more difficult to obtain for certain guns. Leaving springs compressed is obviously a personal decision - my Dad was a PhD in engineering and my brother is an engineer - I won't leave my guns cocked or mags loaded. To each his own.
     
  10. Flint Rock

    Flint Rock New Member

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    No, actually the term I was looking for, and used, is hammer spring.
    Also, the original post was something about magazine springs;) .
    Next thing, in a Winchester 94, or any other gun fired by a free swinging hammer, a weak firing pin spring would not prevent a firing. Something about inertia carrying the firing pin forward after the impact from the hammer,,, that's what causes the gun to fire (that's what my brain surgeon brother told me). A firing pin springs job is to keep the firing pin OFF the primer until the hammer falls. That spring does NOT push the firing pin into the primer. A weak spring won't stop the gun from firing, it actually makes the gun more likely to fire if dropped (if the gun is a design that does not have some sort of internal firing pin safety).
    Oh, "denatured" is not the word most people would use. Metal fatigue would be a better fit, at least that's what all my friends that work for NASA and the JPL say:D .
    One last thing RL, see my signature:D .
     
  11. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Hey Flint...I did...and that's the first thing you've posted that I completely agree with!
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2008
  12. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    I have kept the stock mag for my kimber loaded from day one. The last time I rotated the ammo There was no problem with it.

    I think the springs of today can handel more than the springs of many years ago.
     
  13. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    That may very well be, and I support your right to do that, but I will err on the side of caution since metal fatigue is a given. I am the type of person that cleans an oils his guns after every use. If I don't use them I will take them out and oil them once a year so they don't start to rust. Just personal preferrence, and respect for my investment. On a separate not, this discussion has devolved into personal attacks that are baseless given the fact that metal fatigue in spring steel, and any metal for that fact, has been a well known fact for over a century. The question was whether to keep a mag loaded or not. I don't for the reasons I cited - I am not "telling" anyone to do anything - just stating a fact...if for some strange reason anyone finds that offensive, they can stick their fully-loaded magazines up their pompous ***.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2008
  14. chorst294

    chorst294 New Member

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    Ok guys, while in Glock amorer school, my insructor gave a great example of why the springs don't wear out quickly while supporting a fully loaded magazine. He said the springs responsible for holding your car or truck up are constantly under tension from the weight of your automobile. And you don't have to jack up your vehicle periodically to let those springs rest. I understand opinions are different, but that's the way I look at it.
     
  15. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    The real argument here ( and this makes no sense to me) is that you seem to be doubting or questioning the laws of metalurgy. I already stated that I have a Mossberg that was left cocked for over a year and now needs a new firing pin spring because of this mind-boggling phenomenom known as "metal fatigue"...say what you want, it won't fix my spring..
    Maybe you remember the little wind-up toy cars from years gone by. Wasn't it annoying when eventually they wouldn't go as far or as fast because the coil spring began to wear, and ultimately, even after you wound it all the way up it would only go a few feet...different spring, I know, but same principle.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2008
  16. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    They may not wear out "quickly", but they will wear. You obviously have never replaced the spings in your car. I have. The car was a 1970 Pontiac Tempest and the ride was so sloppy that even spring-assisted shock absorbers didn't help anymore, so I had to replace the front coil springs - where the weight of the engine caused them to take a "set" over time. Then I had to replace the rear coils so the car didn't look like it was taking-off...maybe if Pontiac had used Glock springs this wouldn't have happened..lol....the comparison I made earlier was of someone smoking for 40 years with no ill effects - does that mean smoking doesn't cause lung cancer?
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2008
  17. chorst294

    chorst294 New Member

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    RL357, I completely understand your argument. Metal springs will wear with time. I modify 4x4's in my spare time and have seen springs sag over the years. But, it usually tends to take 20 to 30 years for this to happen. I'll replace my Glock mags in another 16 years or so to keep this from happening! LOL. It might also depend on the quality of springs. I can only assume cheap springs would wear quicker than higher quality springs.
     
  18. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Agreed.. and on a car there are many factors that determine spring wear and rates of wear, my Pontiac was close to bottoming-out over bumps after only 12 - 15 years, but since I don't have the ability to analyze my springs I will continue to unload my mags and make sure I don't store my weapons in the "cocked" condition. Everyone else can do whatever suits them.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2008
  19. godbani mootez

    godbani mootez New Member

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    warning

    :eek: a friend if mine is a cop and he toled me that the weapon may even backfire if the magazine is cmpletely full.
     
  20. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    I guess that ends this discussion...lol