FTE problem returns

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by KG7IL, Jun 3, 2012.

  1. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    I thought my extractor was working fine, but the FTE problem returned.

    I carry everyday, while working in the yard, on the cars, while cutting firewood, gardening, plumbing and tilework and any other activity I am involved in.

    Since I can shoot on my property, I often run a rounds through while in the south 10 and seldom clean the Kimber Ultra.

    Yesterday while running some WWbox 230grs, I once again had failure to eject problems (consitently_ This morning I stripped the slide and looked things over. I cleaned the parts, the extractor looked in great shape.

    It seems that the internal extractor is a bit sensitive to filth and grime.
    As the case head slides up the breechface, it continues to pack the dirt, grease and sawdust into the extractor hole until the extractor hook's grip is comprimised. The action of the extractor seems to suck in the dirt and pound it into a slate like coating or 'plaque' in the extractor pad/ extractor hole. Obviously more tension on the extractor won't solve this problem, nor would I think it would.

    Cleaning seems the easiest solution, but seems rather drastic. Has anyone found a way to keep the crud outa the extractor hole or reduce this plaque build-up. (Blue Painters tape, tissue paper?, flap holster [yuk] non-tacky grease? )

    Before I get lambasted for a troll, or stupid post, please understand that I am serious and wondering how this problem might be solved.
     
  2. cuba

    cuba New Member

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    The problem might be the tight tolerances that kimber engineers into their fire arms, for instance their recommendation to fire 500 round in the break-in period before the weapon runs reliably, but you don't need to hear that, and cry over spilled milk.

    Try running it with a dry lube and as dry as possible and don't use any "tacky grease", so that any accumulated debris in the pistol will shake off when firing the first round in the chamber.

    shoot safe, shoot straight, and have fun
     

  3. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    I'll keep my opinion to myself
     
  4. PlaysWithZombies

    PlaysWithZombies New Member

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    You say you seldom clean it, have you tried properly maintaining it? I'd wager that'll go a long way towards helping solve your problem.
     
  5. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Sawdust?
    Sorry, but I don't know what environment you work in.

    Sawdust?
     
  6. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    He's in Washington and has property and describes working in the yard. I've helped my Father-in-law clear brush and timber on their property. My bet would be that he runs a chainsaw pretty frequently the way vine maple grows out there.
     
  7. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Stop using grease! It's that simple.

    Before we start a Hatfield/McCoy feud, let me tell you what my dislike of grease comes from. Think of grease as lapping compound without the grit. Throw in some powder residue, sand, dirt and general range crap and presto, you have your lapping compound.

    Oil will tend to "wash" these contaminates out of the friction areas. Grease tends to attract and hold these contaminates.

    When I was tuning Fenrir (my 460 Rowland Colt SS XSE) I went with the latest "Super Hi Tec Synthetic Wonder Grease" figuring I may as well go with the latest technology. The grease slowed my cycle times to the point of FTF. After talking with Clark, and seeing this was my first SS 1911, I found out about the inherent friction characteristics of SS slides on SS receivers.

    I was given the same advice, to completely strip the grease and go with oil. I did and the cycle time improved. Then I went on to the lapping procedure and the improvement was so drastic I needed to reduce the recoil spring pressure to slow it down!

    I have been using Mobil 1 for years and with this foray into "Super Grease" I'm glad to say I'm back with Mobil 1 to stay!
     
  8. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    => yup! chainsaws.... and wood working in the shop.
    I'm not using grease, it transfers from the tractor, grease guns and car-parts when crawling around.

    currently I am using Break Free CLP (for cleaning and lubing)

    I will try some dry lube or Mobil1 and give her another weeks worth country fun and see how that works.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
  9. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    If this is truly an environmental thing maybe a military style flap holster is not a bad idea.
     
  10. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    Seems to me, even if you're not meticulous in cleaning most firearms, your carry gun should be maintained with some diligence.
    I use slide grease in miniscule amounts successfully, however in your situation, I'd go with Cane's advice.
    A flap holster sounds like a good idea too.
     
  11. Ranger-6

    Ranger-6 New Member

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    I use grease on the slides of all my guns and never had a problem with any of them. But, then again, every time I shoot, I clean. I don't run dirty guns.
     

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  12. cuba

    cuba New Member

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    You can probably give it a good blow out with an air compressor in the evenings after your done with your chores, and start the day with a relatively cleaned out pistol.

    shoot safe, shoot straight, and have fun.
     
  13. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    I do this weekly with my carry gun except I don't have a compressor but that air in a can works great. Its amazing how much lint can collect inside a gun over a 7 day period.

    Tack
     
  14. rifleshooter474

    rifleshooter474 New Member

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    You must trust your carry firearm, if after you shoot your handguns a while you find out if you can really trust them or not. If you don't trust one then I advise finding one you can trust for carry.;)
     
  15. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    the problem is its one of those high felutin' kimbers. They are made to be used by suits and not areas where REAL work occurs.:p

    Methinks you should get yourself a more blue collar gun (like a Springfield Armory) and your problems will go away. :D
     
  16. cuba

    cuba New Member

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    How is getting a Springfield Armory going to keep the crap out of the breach of his pistol, you might as well suggested the OP move to the city and get a different profession, good grief.

    shoot safe, shoot straight, and have fun
     
  17. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    He was just having a bit of fun.
    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6cxNR9ML8k[/ame]
     
  18. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    I appreciate the helpful answers given in this thread, I even appreciate the humor.
    (The other answers intrique me. Something for firestarting?)

    I hope that you realize that this is a real problem, and that my comment about cleaning was an attempt to clarify that I am looking for an in-process solution.

    I indeed realize that end-of-day cleaning is the best approach, but thought others may solved the 'during the day' problems.

    Although I have the 'smash it in the dirt and mud' Glock, I really find I like the size, weight and trigger of the 3" alloy frame Kimber. It really puts that hunk of lead on target for me and my hands.

    I do blow it out with the air compressor if I think of it while in the shop.
    But the black crud seems to stay despite 125psi squirt. It reminds me of a sedimentary rock. (starts out soft and dry, but under heat and pressure turns to something harder than talc on the Mo scale.

    I spent some time looking for flapped holsters, but not sure the ones I saw will keep out the flying crud. It appears that my current holster does a good, form fitting job of covering the ejector port, so the external crud must be heading past the FPS and moving down.

    I suppose that powder fouling may contribute to the 'fine' stuff on the breach face, and maybe the grease is from the BreakFree CLP wetting the fouled mess.

    So, I decided to try this week with the Ejector, FP and surrounding parts clean and dry.

    Although I can't afford to by the blue collar Springfield, I did however find that my new Stihl hat keeps the sun outa my eyes better than that Starbucks hat.
     
  19. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Well, least that problems solved :D
    I'm a Husky fan myself :eek:
     
  20. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    Update:
    Situation Improves. A dry upper, especially in the extractor area helped quite a bit.
    Grass, Dirt and now.. paint continues to build after a day or so, but the still no failure to fires, failure to eject or chamber. even with some dirty Tula.

    Last night I did a complete detail strip, (less busings and pivot pins on hammer, barrel) and clean.
    Yes.. I actually do clean it, but a long day of work can do more than any year or two in the safe :) or a couple of days at the range.

    Still no good option for a flapped holster. I'll keep looking
     

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    Last edited: Aug 2, 2012