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Saw that huge boars photos on game cameras for years; he was easily identified by the blunt cutters. About two years ago i was sitting in a tree stand. After sunset the hog came by and stopped about 30 yards away. i fired and the hog took off. i don't go looking for large hogs after dark.

Today i found the skull. The teeth are worn within < 1/8 inch from the gums.

 

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One would think these things could be the answer to the global meat shortage! I know some folks eat them are they at all like domestic pork?
 

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One would think these things could be the answer to the global meat shortage! I know some folks eat them are they at all like domestic pork?
Depends on the quality & quantity of groceries they have to eat. Wild hogs that get fat on acorns in the wild are very delicious, smoked, BBQ'd, ground for sausage, cut into chops and such. As long as the hogs are fat, they are very much fit to eat.

Some folks trap them, feed them grain to condition them, then slaughter them.

But a hog in poor condition is not worth fooling with.

Old boars can have strong musky smelling meat when cooking, especially if the hog was dogged or had been agitated just prior to its demise.
 

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Saw that huge boars photos on game cameras for years; he was easily identified by the blunt cutters. About two years ago i was sitting in a tree stand. After sunset the hog came by and stopped about 30 yards away. i fired and the hog took off. i don't go looking for large hogs after dark.

Today i found the skull. The teeth are worn within < 1/8 inch from the gums.


Any sign of the bottom jaw?

In my neck of the woods, we referred to the bottom jaw as the cutters.

We referred to the top tusks as the "wetters", since their purpose is to sharpen the bottom tusks. As if sharpening your knife on a "wet rock".

My great aunt called the tushes, as opposed to tusks. Thus the term some folks use, a tush hog.

A tush hog is on par with a hookin' bull! One bad dude!
 

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There are rumors now and then about hog sightings but from what I can see it's usually an escapee from a local farmer.
Right now we're having a chipmunk infestation! My nearest neighbor who up until now thought they were cute seems to have had a change of mind!
I stopped by to see him yesterday and he was sitting in his yard with a beach umbrella (96 F) and his new air rifle!
 

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There are rumors now and then about hog sightings but from what I can see it's usually an escapee from a local farmer.
Right now we're having a chipmunk infestation! My nearest neighbor who up until now thought they were cute seems to have had a change of mind!
I stopped by to see him yesterday and he was sitting in his yard with a beach umbrella (96 F) and his new air rifle!
Chipmunks and squirrel populations run in cycles proportional to their food supply. I watch this from my property. Some years acorns and such are plentiful, other years, not so much. Chipmunks are rodents no different than mice around a dwelling. They are actually harder to control. FWIW.
 

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Depends on the quality & quantity of groceries they have to eat. Wild hogs that get fat on acorns in the wild are very delicious, smoked, BBQ'd, ground for sausage, cut into chops and such. As long as the hogs are fat, they are very much fit to eat.

Some folks trap them, feed them grain to condition them, then slaughter them.

But a hog in poor condition is not worth fooling with.

Old boars can have strong musky smelling meat when cooking, especially if the hog was dogged or had been agitated just prior to its demise.
I have yet to eat a boar that didnt make me want to gag. I did hunt ferrel hogs when i was younger around Hamburg/Stuttgart in southern AR, but really only the piglets were eatable... at least to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I know some folks eat them are they at all like domestic pork?
IMO: The meat from a fat wild hog is much better than domestic pork. Wild hog meat don't look like domestic pork.

Since 2000 i've hog hunted or trapped at least one day each week when at home. Hunted and trapped 300- 400 wild hogs.

95 percent of the meat i eat is venison and wild hog; i prefer hog meat. Presently eating from a 250 pound fat boar. The chops are huge and delicious.

IME: Smelly and/or strong tasting hog meat is contaminated or rotten hog meat.

1. Hog meat is not improved by "hanging", it rots.

2. Hog hunters contaminate the meat while skinning and field dressing the animal.

3. Failure to get the meat cooled in hot weather. When the temperature is >80 degrees F one has about four hours to get the meat cooled before it begins to deteriorate.

4. Failure to promptly field dress the hog.
 

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I have eaten dishes made with wild boar a few times. It's great game meat, but like all wild game, you need to be aware that it isn't a tamed taste or you're going to be surprised with that first bite.
 
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Yes as Old Gnome said, some of it tastes gamey depending on the area they come from.
Obviously Pigs who have fed on Sage and other similar forage of the like are even more so. But usually in Texas we soak ours in a home made brine solution over night. And depending on the leanness we also on occasion add fat to it. We love it best made in Summer Sausage with Cheeses, Jalapeno Peppers and other spices mixed in it.
Getting hungry just thinking about it!

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