Forehand Arms Revolver.

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by TDS92A, Mar 26, 2014.

  1. TDS92A

    TDS92A New Member Supporter

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    My brother is sending me a Forehand Arms Revolver, circa 1886 - 1887 that needs some TLC.

    The main problem is that the cylinder spins freely in the clockwise direction when the trigger is engaged. Not a good thing. :eek:

    Does anyone have any suggestions on where to start looking for the replacement part? :confused:
     
  2. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Many of those old revolvers were built so the cylinders could spin freely Except of course when they were cocked.
     

  3. TDS92A

    TDS92A New Member Supporter

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    I will look into this. I am trying to diagnose the problem from long distance.

    Thanks for the info!! :D

     
  4. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    Pictures when you get it!
     
  5. TDS92A

    TDS92A New Member Supporter

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    Absolutely!
    I have some now, though they are not what I would normally post. I will try to get them up tonight.

     
  6. TDS92A

    TDS92A New Member Supporter

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    I have confirmed that the cylinder does not spin when the pistol is cocked. Insert sigh of relief here! :D

     
  7. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Yep. I can spin the cylinder on my M1895 Nagant.

    How else do you think they'd play a game of Russian Roulette? :eek: :p

    As long as the cylinder locks up tight when the hammer is cocked, and it's lined up properly, I don't see it being a problem.
     
  8. TDS92A

    TDS92A New Member Supporter

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    Pictures as requested.

    Here are the pics of the Forehand Revolver. More to follow in time.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. TDS92A

    TDS92A New Member Supporter

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    The problem with that is when the user fires off a couple of rounds, puts the weapon in the holster and the cylinder spins without the user noticing it, the user could draw the weapon and pull the trigger on a dead round and make the last mistake of his or her life. :eek: :D

     
  10. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I don't think you'll be using that antique gun for conceal carry. :p

    The Colt Single Action Army also has a spinning cylinder. As did most of the Revolvers back then. That didn't seem to be a problem for lawmen, outlaws, and cowboys back then. ;)

    BTW, congrats on the gun. What caliber is it? Whatever it is, just make sure to NEVER EVER load it with any kind of smokeless powder ammo.

    If it turns out to be something like .32 or .38 rimfire, you'll have to get a little creative to make the ammo. The new stuff is a bit pricier then you'd probably want to pay.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
  11. twoolddogs

    twoolddogs New Member

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    If it is marked Forehand Arms Company, it is post 1890.

    Hopkins and Allen Arms Company purchased Forehand Arms Company in 1902and continued the Forehand line of products until at least circa 1905.
     
  12. TDS92A

    TDS92A New Member Supporter

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    I have no idea at this time what the caliber is. My brother is slower than a snail moving backwards when it comes to getting things done in a timely fashion. :D


    Thanks for narrowing down the time frame! Now is it just a piece of history or is there some collectors value attached to it?

     
  13. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    No....................
     
  14. TDS92A

    TDS92A New Member Supporter

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    That is harsh. Not even sentimental value? :D:D

     
  15. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Every gun has value but most do not have collector value. :)
     
  16. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Firearms made prior to 1899 are legal antiques (not BATFE firearms) and command much higher resale value.
     
  17. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Depends on the gun and condition. I've seen plenty of 32 Rimfire revolvers made by little know gun makers (many of these would probably be considered Saturday Night Specials) for sale for around $100. Most were in ok or poor condition. Fireable, but I wouldn't want to take the chance on these. (other guns made by known reputable gun makers I wouldn't have a problem loading up and shooting).
     
  18. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    While the first half of this statement is entirely true the second half is only sometimes true.
     
  19. twoolddogs

    twoolddogs New Member

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    Most utility grade revolvers made before the advent of smokeless powder, circa 1908-1910, were chambered for Black Powder cartridges and are not considered acceptable for use with modern ammunition.

    Also, most of the more obscure revolver manufacturers of utility grade revolvers were no longer in business by the 1908-1910 time frame, having been purchased or absorbed by larger, more prominent manufacturers.

    Those that survived into the smokeless powder era, i.e. Harrington and Richardson Arms Company, Hopkins and Allen Arms Company, Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle Works, Meriden Fire Arms Company, effectively made the transition and produced revolvers designed for smokeless powder.
     
  20. Hillbillyjim

    Hillbillyjim New Member

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    One very important thing to remember, Modern pistols which this is, may NOT be sent through the mail except between FFL's. Further if your brother does not live in the same state as you then you should go through an FFL to effect transfer.