For the police

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by McNabb11b, Mar 2, 2009.

  1. McNabb11b

    McNabb11b New Member

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    America has finally pulled it's head out of its nether regions at least somewhat and there is a lot more of troop appreciation going on these days than there were fairly recently. I even have people come up to me and shake my hand. Even though that it makes me a little uncomfortable because I have not been deployed anywhere and the thanks belongs to actual veterans, it is still nice. The thing that bothers me however is the police. Why are there not a lot of bumper stickers thanking them for putting themselves on the line? Why are there not people going out of their way to shake their hands and thank them? There is a huge statistic of stroke, heart attack, and other stress related illnesses caused from them simply doing their duty. It is about time that they start getting the recognition that they deserve rather than the mistrust and scorn brought on by a few bad apples and the media. Thank you to all of the law enforcement personnel, If it weren't for you, America would be a lot worse off.

    Police Family Bumper Stickers from CafePress
     
  2. orangello

    orangello New Member

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  3. McNabb11b

    McNabb11b New Member

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    I realise that, but there are also bad guys in the military also. This week I am going to go out of my way and personally thank every cop that I see.(withing reason) That was two people with questionable tactics and by far not the majority. If they are more appreciated, maybe there will be a little less us vs. them attitudes.
     
  4. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    True & when that idiot puppy-tosser video came out, there was a fairly swift response by military officials in investigating the incident & the personnel involved. The final resolution of many cases involving police mistakes/criminal activity don't seem to get as much coverage as when somebody drops the ball. The granny killers in Atlanta were recently sentenced for their crimes & i didn't hear any great fanfare about it. It was a footnote on CNN. If police departments would become more proactive and do more to prevent the "blue wall" effect, real or more likely perceived, they would be more appreciated. That is just my opinion.

    Also, when a soldier accidentally kills or injures someone that shouldn't have been a target, that somebody is usually on another continent, speaks another language, and doesn't look so much like the person we passed at the post office as the average victim of a police mistake.

    When i was a little kid, i was very impressed with our local police in my small home town; as i grew older, i kept hearing about little scandals that were swept under the rug. That kind of thing doesn't lead to a trusting relationship.
     
  5. McNabb11b

    McNabb11b New Member

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    You have quite a few good points. The reason that I started this thread was to thank all of the police that do do their duty to the best of their ability. There are many police that are decent people who are exposed to danger because of their job. I am pretty sure that the overwhelming majority of police are like this. As for the ones that are corrupt, they should serve much stiffer criminal sentences than the average citizen because they are held to a higher standard.
     
  6. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Quite true! There were a couple in southern MS back in the 90's; they issued me a citation for misdemeanor possession of marijuana on a canoe trip. These two were really just trying to make sure none of the younger kids on the river that day saw us college kids drinking beer (2 ice chests per each of a dozen canoes). They were nice enough to go out of their way to give a buddy of mine a ride to get my ID & money for my fine. Those were some darn good cops in my opinion! I felt much worse about the beer & bud than i would have if they had been jerks & the young lady with me (also fined for her buds) agreed. I wish there were more LEO's like those two.

    {RIP to the one long arm of the law. :( }
     
  7. McNabb11b

    McNabb11b New Member

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    Very true. It seems to me that (speaking of marijuana) the police are also held under scrutiny for having to uphold laws that many see as illegal. Some of our laws have no business being law and the police are penalized for having to uphold that law, as in the case of drug laws, seat belt laws, drinking laws, etc.
    Instead of holding the police responsible for doing their job, we should be holding lawmakers responsible for passing silly laws that they have no business being in.
    I also have had run ins with good cops and complete dicks that had a chip on their shoulder because of their power, but I have found these to be few and far between.
     
  8. hillbilly68

    hillbilly68 New Member

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    I have nothing but respect for the men and women that do that job. Yeah, EVERY profession has it bad apples. These guys put their lives on the line every day they are out. Every day during their career that they are out on the road or street, not 12 or 15 months at a time. Liability and the hostile press a constant presence while dealing with dirtbags that would sooner assault an officer than anything...no thanks. God Bless 'em.
     
  9. McNabb11b

    McNabb11b New Member

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    But what would happen if they weren't there? There would be either complete lawlessness, or vigilante justice where you could get hung for killing a milk cow or killed for something that you didn't even do. As a general rule vigilantes care nothing for due process. By their very presence, the police curtail a lot more crime than you realize.
    The police are not superman, It is unrealistic to expect them to be at the scene of a crime on time 100% of the time. The fact that they can't wormhole to another spot on earth is the reason that I myself am also armed. The police make it so that there is a smaller chance that I will have to use my weapon to protect myself.
     
  10. dnthmn2004

    dnthmn2004 New Member

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    McNabb said it best. And certainly in a calmer manner than I could ever have responded to that sh1t you just spewed out of your mouth. There are a lot of very respectable LEOs here and your certainly not making yourself welcome. I think I'll let robocop tear you a new a$$hole.
     
  11. McNabb11b

    McNabb11b New Member

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    If you were driving 1mph over the speed limit, you were breaking the law. Let's say that the posted speed limit sign is 75. That does not mean 76. There is a willful intent to break the law, regardless of whether you were traveling 76 or 120 mph. They were there doing their job. Get angry at yourself for breaking the law, not the police for upholding it.
     
  12. dnthmn2004

    dnthmn2004 New Member

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    Being a police officer is a very thankless job. I found this article written by Henry P. Henson, retired Chief of the Norfolk, Virginia, Police Department, and it sums it up pretty well.

    Police officers work in situations that most people never experience. They provide 24-hour-a-day, 7-day-a-week protection for their communities. They may work all night, then wait in court all day. Or, they may work all night, when most people sleep, then come home to their families getting ready to start their day. Or, they may work all night, trying to stay awake when things are calm, yet be alert to suddenly respond to a robbery or homicide and handle it properly. Or, they may work all night, aware of the resulting fatigue and poor health that comes from unnatural sleep patterns. Or, worst of all, they may work all night knowing that their families never may see them alive again. Oh, yes, many people work a night shift, but do they face the same situations as police officers?

    At times, an officer may be physically tired from trying to subdue a person who will not submit to arrest, from chasing a suspect on foot, from swimming in a cold polluted river to rescue citizens from drowning after their car crashed, from leaning over a ledge on a building high above the ground holding onto a person who was trying to jump off, or from any number of other physical situations that might occur and which most people never experience. These represent only some of the situations that police officers find themselves in at any time. There are many others. How about sitting down to eat lunch, but immediately having to leave it to respond to an urgent call? How about working and not knowing what danger may occur on the next call? How about getting shot at, seeing the bright glint of a knife blade in a subject's hand, being attacked by a crazed drug addict, or facing an attacker who is mentally ill? And, what about that' "loose nut" behind the steering wheel of a car? Who's going to stop him? If you'r e a police officer, it's YOU! You who joined the police department because you cared about other people. You who went through 28 weeks of extensive training--8 hours a day, 40 hours a week--involving the knowledge of criminal laws, ethics, firearms training, defensive tactics, and physical training, 7 long months of training. You who got on-the-job training by working with an experienced officer for 2 or 3 months or until your supervisors believed that you were capable of working alone. You who faced probation for at least a year from the time you were sworn in as a police officer. You who, through it all, prided yourself on becoming the best officer that you could and to always perform your job in the proper manner.

    Some citizens understand what the police officer has to contend with. Most, however, only have a general idea of what a police officer does, but no idea of the details of the job or of what it takes to become a "cop." As a police officer, you need a thorough knowledge of rules and procedures concerning the power of arrest, search and seizure, probable cause, and the use of force. You must know the proper procedures for transporting prisoners; be aware of any safety concerns to yourself and others; be able to detect potential evidence at a crime scene; know the proper procedures for collecting and preserving that evidence; have the ability to write clear, concise, and detailed reports; be able to follow correct radio-transmitting procedures; and be alert to all radio transmissions. You must be familiar with street names, with businesses and their hours, and anything that may be out of the ordinary. You must drive safely and be conscious of all types of road conditions. You need the ability to interrogate and i nterview people effectively and efficiently to get as much information as possible. You must apply discretion in using police powers, answering alarms, investigating traffic accidents, responding to and handling suicide and hostage situations, and giving aid to victims and offenders. You must know how to testify in court and how to operate computers. You must know all of this, and more, to fulfill the many roles that you will play during the course of your career. These roles include those of a lawyer, a doctor, a counselor, a social worker, a security specialist, a mediator, and a negotiator.

    You will work all hours of the day and night, on your wedding anniversary, on Christmas, and on the day your kid stars in the kindergarten play. When you hear explosions, gunshots, or screams, you must run toward them, not away. You must love children, even those shooting at you. You have to be able to separate a knife-wielding husband from his pistol-wielding wife, without injury to anyone. When you arrest one, the other person jumps on your back. People curse you; you can't curse back. People hate you; you can't hate back. You can never lose your temper. You have to solve major crimes in a day or you're not doing your job. If you stop for 5 minutes, you're goofing off. If you accept a cup of coffee, you're on the take. In a hostage situation, if you shoot the hostage taker, you're a killer. If you don't shoot him, but continue talking to him and someone is injured or killed, then you're indecisive and stupid. You're unpopular, all of the time, every hour of every day, until someone needs you.

    No other job in America is so complex as that of a law enforcement officer. It will continue to be so. That is why we in the profession must make sure that we hire only the best people, keep only the best people, and promote only the best people. We must commend those officers who strive daily to uphold the high ideals of the profession and attempt to garner support from our communities to value the brave men and women who have dedicated themselves to serving others. In short, let us reverse the mind-set of those people who hold that officers are unappreciated until they're dead; then, they get a parade.
     
  13. McNabb11b

    McNabb11b New Member

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    Good article Dan, Thanks this is heading more in the direction that I had intended. A thank you to the men and women in law enforcement.
     
  14. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Bovice, everyone is entitled to their own opinion (1st amendment), and i'm sure at some younger more angry point in my life i shared yours or at least most of it. That said, i'm pushing 40 now and have met some seriously scummy and scary people and some almost completely defenseless people; i'm glad there are cops out there to keep the truly scary & truly scummy away from the almost completely defenseless. If i had to read about some decrepit old lady getting beaten senseless for her retirement check as often as that kind of thing would happen without any cops, i would have a really hard time enjoying my buzz. Yes, by the way, i do firmly believe in the deterrent effect of a police presence; i can't tell you how many times i've changed my route due to the likelihood of a roadblock at some spot favored by the local police or sheriff.

    GENERALLY (aka mostly & hopefully to the best of their abilities) the police keep my lil corner of the world safe enough for getting busted for smokin the weed to be one of my bigger worries, as opposed to getting mugged for my weed or having to shoot some idiot for trying to steal my collection of handblown glass weed pipes or molest my cat. The occasional N00B who writes you an erroneous traffic citation is probably not out-to-get-you; stupid mistakes happen, that is what traffic court is for.

    They do screw up & some fabulously so (granny killers, etc.), but overall, we are better off worrying about them than those they keep in check. OVERALL.

    You will probably feel differently later.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2009
  15. Gestapo Hunter

    Gestapo Hunter New Member

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    trust me i did some police work myself and there are always people out there who thinks they can do your job better then you can.
     
  16. Gestapo Hunter

    Gestapo Hunter New Member

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    vigilantes can be worse then the criminal themselves, cause youll have people kill you for simple crimes like jay walking.
     
  17. McNabb11b

    McNabb11b New Member

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    What are you 12? Why don't you go ahead and tell the families of the police that died in the line of duty how worthless they are. There many men and women who don't come home doing their jobs, and you sit there calling them worthless. Vigilante justice has never been a good thing. Charles Bronson is an actor telling a fictional story. The dedication of those officers that are prepared to die for your safety is not. Keep your mouth shut before betraying your ignorance.
     
  18. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Stand down Bovice, I don't need to hear that dribble on the FTF!
     
  19. dnthmn2004

    dnthmn2004 New Member

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    You need to start getting the paper and read the police log. I don't know where you get your assumptions and suggestions about what police really do. But seriously, get your head out of your *** and realize that police are for the safety of the general population. Yes, some are lazy, some use too much force, and some love giving speeding tickets. Those are the guys you always hear about on the news. You almost NEVER hear about police officers breaking up a domestic, or arresting drug dealers, or gang members. Its because it happens every day and is expected of good police officers.

    You should be happy the USA has the police force it does. Did you know in Russia, police can pull you over just because they had hunch? They don't need PC, and don't have nearly as strict laws governing police officers.
     
  20. McNabb11b

    McNabb11b New Member

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    Oh, I got it. I understand exactly what you are saying. That you are upset with an institution for doing what they are supposed to do. You are irritated because they won't look the other way at your indiscretions and they won't nail other people to the wall. A crime is a crime no matter how small. What makes you so special that you are allowed to breach the law and get away with it but others should hang? Also if vigilante justice is such a great idea, why is it still not in place as the ruling institution?