??? For All Shooters - "Your 3 Absolutes"

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by Okie_6Shooter, Nov 14, 2013.

  1. Okie_6Shooter

    Okie_6Shooter New Member

    75
    0
    0
    I was hoping to hear people's top 3 things that they feel are keys to consistent and accurate shooting. It may be something in the mechanics, equipment, or mental approach. I would assume there would be things mentioned that could help all experience level shooters' to gain knowledge or reaffirm knowledge. I personally look forward to apply some things into my own target practice/hunting. Thanks!
     
  2. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    consistency would be IMO the most important thing. consistent rifle, optics, ammo and the shooter. when you can repeat everything, each and everytime, accuracy will increase.

    of course, natural ability doesn't hurt. some people are just gifted when it comes to shooting. it's taken me many years to get to the same level with a rifle as my father is, but i am much better with pistols than he is. i am also better with a shotgun than my father, simply because i have done much more shooting with shotguns.

    time spent sending rounds down range builds consistency. IMO, there is just no substitute for putting rounds down range. practice and more practice, and then practice some more.
     

  3. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
    Most problems regarding competition shooting is poor shooting disciplines. These are linked to bad advise to young shooters or self learned techniques. Take an NRA Handgun shooting class. That will bring out your shooting talents.:)
     
  4. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

    4,993
    52
    48
    I would say trigger control is up close to the top. I like to dry fire my guns when I first get them. It helps me to know when the trigger will break. I like to quickly bring the trigger to the point just before it fires. Then slowly squeeze the last millimeter or so.

    To be good with any gun you must practice with it. I can pick up any gun and defend myself with it. But to use a gun for competition I must be intimately familiar with the trigger.
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    I'm with Rick on this. Trigger control. Trigger control. Trigger control.

    Stance is a close second.

    And then consistency. Have to do it all the same, every time.
     
  6. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

    8,039
    0
    0
    Agree with all of this. Esp. On the ammo.
     
  7. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

    7,551
    1
    0
    I have to agree with Axxe55. Consistency is the most important factor, even over a high end trigger. And as he said consistency comes after familiarity with your firearms which takes lots of practice and rounds down range.

    High end triggers are great but only after a shooter has reached a certain level. We've all seen a good shooter with a marginal gun easily outshoot a guy with a superior gun.
     
  8. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

    8,039
    0
    0
    Edit :

    And even the worst trigger can be adjusted enough to be "good" enough. Try telling that to the fresh faced 22 y.o. ROTC(Rotsie) who knows as much as my Dog..( Naah,..even Gator is smarter then some Rotsie's)
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2013
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    IMO, consistency covers all aspects of shooting. trigger pull, stance, sight picture, grip, ect.,,,,,,, when shooting pistols. i like to liken it to all the stars being in perfect alignment!

    even a bad trigger can be compensated for if the shooter is consistent when he shoot it. on the subject of triggers, i much prefer a smooth trigger over one that's light. i have had a gunsmith friend of mine do trigger jobs for me on pistols before, where he merely smoothed them up but didn't make any changes in the pull weight. when done they felt like they hada lighter pull, but when measured, the pull weight had changed only very slightly.
     
  10. karateguy28

    karateguy28 New Member

    146
    0
    0
    Consistency, practice, and patience. Getting good at anything doesn't happen overnight and can sometimes be frustrating. But, if you can be patient with yourself, the results will begin to show after time.
     
  11. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    and people will show different rates of improvement as well.

    like my father and i. my father uses a shotgun to run off stray dogs or to kill a snake every once in awhile. he keeps a shotgun for SD/HD purposes. i shot sporting clays years ago for a few years. if i had to guess, i am probably a much better shot with a shotgun than he is, simply because i have shot way many more rounds than he has. i also shoot many more pistols rounds than he does. my father is not a bad shot with a pistol, and has an old Dan Wesson with an 8.5" barrel and target sights that he shoots quite well, but i am a more consistent shooter with a much broader range of pistols at close range. the difference is that his pistol is a target pistol and he shoots much longer distances than i do. up close, is where i use pistols though. clearly a difference in pistol usage.
     
  12. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

    12,370
    59
    48
    Professional training can overcome some bad habits. But if not done correctly, can introduce some new bad habits.

    I've seen a couple of guys who attended a "name" school. After graduating, they went to shoot in a competition. Both got disqualified after the first string. They "swept" their non-dominant they used to locate holster while putting the gun in.

    1. Know the rules and safety procedures, and adapt. A rule book will give information on what is not allowed.
    2. Know how to apply the basics of shooting to what you are doing. I can normally outshoot people using their firearms when I concentrate on the basics.
    3. Practice is good if it does not introduce bad habits. Evaluate what you are doing and see if there is a better (and maybe safer) way.
     
  13. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    2
    0
    Breathing is one of the most forgotten part of shooting. It doesn't matter what type of shooting you do breathing matters. If you breath properly your way ahead of most of the world before you fire a shot.
     
  14. Mouser

    Mouser Active Member

    733
    46
    28
    1. focus on the front sight
    2. Squeeze the trigger in a way that surprises you when the gun goes off
    3. Practice, practice and more practice

    Those would be my top three...if you do those, your shooting will improve
     
  15. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

    8,409
    1
    0
    1-good ammo

    2-a quiet mind

    3-a firm grip
     
  16. JW357

    JW357 New Member

    6,716
    1
    0
    I would agree trigger control is top in my book.

    1 - Trigger Control
    2 - Consistency (doing everything the same each time)
    3 - Can I say trigger control again? No? Well then I'll say "Mental Relaxation."

    Regarding breathing, I agree that "proper" breathing is very important on rifle shooting. I've found that proper breathing doesn't do much for me for handgun shooting, though. Of course, I'm not really a precision shooter, but I find bad trigger control to be much more detrimental to my shooting than improper breathing, when handgunning.
     
  17. jeffkaiser1989

    jeffkaiser1989 New Member

    329
    0
    0
    1: Practice safe loading and discharging of the firearm in question
    2: Get to know your trigger use dry firing if you can or invest in dummy rounds.
    3: Hit the range and work at your stance follow through and proper sight picture. In short spend a few weeks getting to the range as much as possible.
     
  18. AR10

    AR10 New Member

    2,264
    0
    0
    1: don't point the muzzle at anything you do not intend to shoot.

    2: don't put your finger on the trigger until you are ready to shoot.

    3: don't load your gun until you are ready to use it.
     
  19. Jstrong

    Jstrong New Member

    984
    0
    0
    For practical handgun accuracy, id say my list goes

    Trigger control,I learned this early as a young shooter how far this would take you,mastered it and quickly started out shooting my dad and family

    Proper stance/presentation,since I've started shooting IDPA doing my nightly dry fire practice I've noticed that I had a tendency to form a weaver-esque stance with elbows bent after the draw,but when I force myself to push the gun out to an isosceles stance and lock my elbows I get a much more consistent sight picture when trying to get the gun on target quick as I can.

    Patience/muscle memory,I've learned to have patience with a new gun in order to tap my own accuracy potential,until I've got enough rounds down range with a particular gun that I have the muscle memory built with it to shoot it fast. There really is no substitute for being intimately familiar with a particular gun.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2013
  20. JW357

    JW357 New Member

    6,716
    1
    0
    Does a shotgun sitting in a home for defensive purposes count as using it?

    Does a CCW gun on the hip count as being used?

    "Ready to use it" sounds to me like ready to fire it.