Flash hider/ muzzle break

Discussion in 'Firearm Accessories & Gear' started by Josh1158, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

    757
    0
    0
    What's the dif between a flash hider and a muzzle break?
     
  2. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

    6,424
    0
    0
    A flash hider hides the muzzle flash "some more than others",and a muzzle break tames the recoil a bit
     

  3. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

    757
    0
    0
    I gathered that just by the name. What is different in the design of them? They both just look like tubes with holes or slots.
     
  4. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

    6,424
    0
    0
    Thats pretty much what they all are,and some can serve as both flash hider and break. I honestly cant answer the visual difference that set the two apart, but it may be partially due to the different hole and slotted patterns that are used to which job it will do. I use a smith enterprise Vortex flash hider on my M4 and it also acts as a partial muzzle break. Another good one to look at is the AAC Blackout flash hider.Both of the companies that i have mentioned also make a DC "direct connect" sound suppressor that attaches over the flash hiders,if you ever wanted to go that route.
     
  5. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

    114
    0
    0
    Flash hiders are usually omni-directional in their venting, with smaller ports or slits that contain the flash.
    Muzzle Brakes or Compensators have ports designed in such a way to redirect muzzle energy to the sides and/or top, aiding in keeping the weapon on target and reducing recoil. The best designes have chambers and ports proportional to the caliber and loading they intend to control. The Grand Pu-Bah of brakes is the T style on the Barrett .50 caliber rifles and the British Royal Horse Artillery AS90 gun. The funny wedge shaped device found on many AKs is surprisingly effective in controling muzzle rise, and it's no bigger than the end of your thumb.
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,328
    174
    63
    PS- it is a muzzle BRAKE. Brake as in stop- as in slow down. Unless you damaged your muzzle (break) .
     
  7. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

    757
    0
    0
    Thanks. Sooo if I wanted to make one its basically a tube with holes or slots? I'm not trying to say I'm gona get a pipe and pop in some holes and call it good. I have access to machines that could do this with no prob and occasional free time at work. If this is all it really is how much bigger should the exit hole be in relation to the bullet?
     
  8. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

    114
    0
    0
    Sure. Read up on some basics, like how large the bore needs to be. I have seen anything from .020 to .040 larger than the bore of the barrel. Port size and placement matter. Clocking matters. They aren't usually straight up. 1 o'clock for right handers, 11 o'clock for a lefty, the basic idea.
    A front wall with a spacious interior chamber is what really helps put the brakes on recoil. a smaller portion of gas vented upward helps muzzle rise, etc. The bottom is usually free of holes to minimize dust kick up when shooting prone or from a berm.
     
  9. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    Note the open end of the flash hider and the closed end of the muzzle brake. The closed end increases the pressure inside the expansion chamber causing high pressure gasses to vent perpendicular to the muzzle.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

    757
    0
    0
    K I think I got it. Not sure if I'm gona try and make one. I have a few parts that Im thinking about crafting myself.
     
  11. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

    9,535
    129
    63
    They are not compatible. They each perform a different purpose and those purposes oppose each other. There are a lot of worthless dual units out there that are sold for looks not function. The flash hider is to hide the flash from the shooter not someone on the other end. The muzzle brake reduces recoil by redirecting the gas at the muzzle and will increase the flash seen by the shooter. Shoot them both in dim light or in the dark and you will see the difference. Shoot the flash hider first because you will blind for a bit after shooting the muzzle brake in the dark. Do not put a muzzle brake on a firearm that you might have to use at night. Learned this the hard way.
     
  12. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

    757
    0
    0
    Good advice, thanks
     
  13. shooter88

    shooter88 New Member

    570
    0
    0
    What about a 12 gauge? Ive seen them but idk were to get them???