Fitting my shotgun stock.

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by sloejoe, Jun 16, 2010.

  1. sloejoe

    sloejoe New Member

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    In mounting my Baikal O/U 20ga. I am positive I need more drop in the comb. Does this mean a stock replacement or can the factory stock be modified to this purpose. When shouldered I see the complete length of the barrel & as such all shots are high. To receive the correct sight plane my cheek must be back near the recoil pad & the upper half (heel) of the stock is not touching my shoulder at all. Length of pull seems correct but all else is off. Drop at the heel might correct some of the problem but I (my Okie thinking) think the comb drop is the main culprit. I know I should have it fitted but I was wondering--New stock or adjust the orignal. Hmmmmmm----
     
  2. Fisherking

    Fisherking New Member

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    I would say take down the comb till it fits you right and your sight picture is right. It sounds like it is a preaty straight stock. Try to form it back to the butt. Check often as you cant put the wood back on after it is removed.
    F.K.
     

  3. sloejoe

    sloejoe New Member

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    Fisherking, would this mean lowering the cheek area & thus making the cheek section thinner vertically. I have did lots of stock refinishing but no stock carving or adjusting. By adjusting the comb area does this also adjust the drop at the heel? I think I remember one way of checking the drop at the heel is to stand the shotgun flat on the buttpad & lean the gun against a wall & measure the distance from the wall to the muzzle --or am I confusing this with some other check? I just want to be sure before I start. Thanks for all your info--wish I knew enough to answer some of your questions- envy-envy.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2010
  4. Fisherking

    Fisherking New Member

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    If you are taking wood off the comb I would bring the cut back to the heal of the stock so I gess this would lower the drop. It would make the distance between the heal and toe of the butt shorter.
    I usualy use a scraper( piece of flat thin steel with a rolled edge) to do this. It takes off a small roll of wood off at a time.
    F.K.
     
  5. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    Good answers but a quick word of advise-if the comb is lower than at heel the gun will seem to kick less because the stock won't be smacking the shooter's cheek during recoil. Be sure to have the comb go down in the front.
     
  6. sloejoe

    sloejoe New Member

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    Good answers both of you--I will study on this before I start & try to determine if I think I can do it. I'll be back.
     
  7. Fisherking

    Fisherking New Member

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    Thats what I like about life You are always learning and gaining new knowlage.
    Thanks Bear for the added input. That makes scence(sp), I should have done that with this old Rugger 44 mag simi carbine I had twenty rounds and a swollen cheek every time. I traded it for three Black powder guns and wasn't sad to see it go.
    F.K.
     
  8. sloejoe

    sloejoe New Member

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    speaking of shooting & swolen cheeks, years ago when I was just starting out with a .30-06 I acquired a beautiful winchester 54. Not knowing squat about anything centerfire, I purchased this gun for $40.00 at a pawn shop. The finish was beautiful but it wasn't a mod.70 so I was somewhat disatisfied by that. I didn't know the rifle had been restocked & it must have been an amature that did it but the cheek piece was reversed. Thick at front & tapering back to the butplate. Every time I shot that rifle I got busted in the mouth & cheek. After about 3 shots I looked like a self sacrafice complete with thick lips & bloody teeth & a powerful headache. I traded that rifle straight across for a sporterized FN Mauser & that was when I realized the cheekpiece on the Win54 was backward. I've always been cautious about the comb & drop at the heel ever since. What an experience for the inexperienced.
     
  9. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald New Member

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    It's no longer May but hopefully, you haven't begun removing wood from your comb yet.

    In my opinion, it's usually a terrible idea. A much better way would be to install an "add-on" rib on top of your exiting rib. Add-n ribs are available in aluminum or space-age delrin plastic. Delrin ribs attach to the existing rib with double-sided tape and have been used successfully for years by people like us with low cheekbones.

    To determine how high an add-on rib would need to be, use a thin strip of wood taped to your rib. Balsa from a hobby shop works very well. A cut-off map pin will work for a temporary bront bead if you need one.

    Experiment with the height until you can look along the rib with snug cheek pressure on the comb. Order an add-on rib from a number of sources that you can find by posting a thread on a Website. Welcome to the Stock Fitter's Bible - Removing the Mystery by Rollin Oswald
     
  10. sloejoe

    sloejoe New Member

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    Thanks Rollin--I will check it out. I suppose Brownell's has this rib?
     
  11. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald New Member

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    Joe,

    I don't know if Brownells carrys them. They may but I haven't checked - World's Largest Supplier of Firearm Accessories, Gun Parts and Gunsmithing Tools - BROWNELLS.

    Add-on ribs have been discussed on Trapshooters.com several times. You might post a thread there titled "Who sells delrin add-on ribs?"
    You will need to give the length of your barrel.

    I remember seeing someone there fselling them for less than $100 several months ago. Some shooters also ordered delrin stock, made their own ribs and stuck them on with silicone, as I recall. (You could even make one out of wood, paint it flat black and attach it with silicone.)

    Rollin (I don't remember if this site has signatures or not.)
     
  12. Fisherking

    Fisherking New Member

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    Good call I didn't even think of an add on rib.
    F.K.
     
  13. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald New Member

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    Joe,

    You are plagued with the same condition as mine: low cheekbones.

    You have two choices to solve the problem other than mounting the gun with your cheek way back on the comb.

    You could remove wood from the comb to lower it and make it farther below the level of the rib (usually not the best way) OR you could attach an "add-on" rib to the rib on the gun.

    Add-on ribs are available from a variety of sources and can be made of Delrin plastic or of aluminum. The aluminum ribs are more expensive compared to the Delrin ribs that can be had for around $100. They are available on your choice of heights up to about 3/4".

    You would need to know the exact height add-on rib that is needed before ordering one. To find that height, tape a strip or two strips of wood onto your existing rib. Balsa from a hobby shop works very well because it is soft and can be cut and sanded easily.

    Although one long strip of wood on the rib is better than two short ones, if using two strips, tape one near the muzzle and the other one on the rib near the receiver. The thickness of the strip(s) is correct when you can mount the gun and look along the surface of the strips or slightly down onto it (or them) if you use your gun for shooting trap's rising clay targets.

    I do not remember who sells Delrin add-on ribs (stuck successfully to the existing rib with double-sided tape) but you can find out by posting a thread on either Trapshooters.com or Shotguns and more Shotguns! ShotgunWorld.com is Your Best Source for Shotgun Information.

    Experimenting with the wood strip(s) will allow you to arrive at the correct add-on rib height. If you have any questions, email me at rollin@stockfitting.com or call me at (920) 464-0124.

    Rollin