Fitness and Firearms

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by SGT-MILLER, Oct 24, 2009.

  1. SGT-MILLER

    SGT-MILLER New Member

    2,350
    0
    0
    First thing somebody will sometimes say when you ask them about being "fit to fight" will be the standard "It doesn't take much to pull a trigger".

    That statement is correct in a sense, but there is a big problem with it. There has never been a self defense situation where all that happened was the trigger was calmly pulled a few times, and the threat ends. Usually what happens is the person defending their life will experience a HUGE adrenaline dump into their system, which causes tunnel vision and loss of fine motor control. Their heart will race as their fight or flight reflex occurs. Sometimes the person will either void their bladder or in some cases, their colon. The person will be aiming, squeezing the trigger, and moving at the same time. Usually what happens is the person will be moving backwards away from the threat, or moving towards some sort of cover. If the person has any type of warrior training (i.e. Army, Marine Corp, etc....) they will be closing the distance to his/her attacker.

    Now imagine that the engagement is extended. Imagine that the fight for some reason has lasted long enough that your first magazine has been expended, and you are now reloading and continuing the fight. The stress level will go even higher because your brain has "caught up" in a sense and you realize more of what is going on, and you have the conscious thoughts of "I may die" or "he may hurt me or my family".

    Now step back for second and answer this question to yourself and be honest.

    Will my body and mind be able to handle the stress of an engagment?

    Will my cardiovascular system (especially the heart) handle a severely stressful event?

    Is there a chance that due to my fitness level (or lack of) that I may not be able to perform at the moment of truth?

    The reason I bring this up is because this is something that is drilled into any servicemembers brain during training. Forum members like IGETEVEN, Hydrashok, and other vets can vouch for this. The main rule is to be fit to fight in order to win the fight.

    You don't have to be a bodybuilder, or as fit as a special operator, but you owe it to yourself to be as fit as you are able.

    Most of you have seen my videos on youtube, and you can see that I'm not anything special. I'm not super toned (yet), but I work out 1-3 times a day. I have gotten to the point where I can run 5 miles with a 30 pound ruck (kinda hurts a little), and I usually perform 100-300 pushups and situps a day. I spend more and more time at the gym, and the benefits are getting even better and better for me.

    The one thing I have noticed is my shooting skills. Since I have been getting into a better shape than a pear, I've noticed that my reaction times have gotten quicker, the recoil much easier to control, my speed, and accuracy, have improved.

    I urge all of you to think about a fitness program. Check with your doc if you haven't done any time of workouts before you start. Being fit will help your skills with your defensive firearm regardless of what the firearm is.


    Also, chicks dig fit guys...................
     
  2. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

    8,411
    3
    0
    Another great fitness post SGT., I'm going to the garage and........get a beer.

    OK, Ill clear the junk off the Bowflex and work out first!! Damned slave driver!
     

  3. SGT-MILLER

    SGT-MILLER New Member

    2,350
    0
    0
    Believe me I have a hard time keeping up with it. My goal is to be completely ripped out by the time the new year hits. I have extra motivation because I will be going back across the puddle to again deal with Jonny Mohammed and the jihad cronies.

    Hopefully I will have achieved my goal. I'll remember to post a pic up here if I do...lol.

    You'll be amazed how fitness affects your performance with your gun.

    Another note:

    A sad reality is that there is a high chance you may take a bullet during a gunfight. It's reality, and it happens. Even the highest trained operators will take a few unintended steel injections sometimes. The fitness level you are at may determine if you survive the gunshot or not.

    Stay fit, Stay alive, Stay safe
     
  4. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

    8,411
    3
    0
    OK, 25 minutes on the Bowflex..Biceps, tris, sholders, chest, abs and lower back. Now if I can drag my nearly 60 year old body outa bed tomorrow, lower body.

    Thanks for the motivation Miller, and I skipped the beer!
     
  5. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    4
    0
  6. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

    8,358
    4
    0
    "bump"...............
     
  7. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    4
    0
    man I came back and reread this boy you know how to make a guy look at himself in the mirror and start crying like a dam panty wearing girl.

    Not that I cried at all I am like Klingons I have no tear ducts.
     
  8. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

    1,257
    0
    0
    Great post, Sarge. I'm a fat lazy f+*k, and I was overweight for a good portion of my short life. It was very hard for me to keep up with any sort of fitness regime, I just lost interest very quickly. At the peak of my obesity I was over 140kg (around 309 pounds), and I felt like crap.

    Luckily, a little over a year ago I met an MMA coach at a knife collector's event. He started working with me and now I'm 105kg (227lb) which is OK for my height and build (I'm around 6 feet 2"), and some of it is actually muscle now. I turned one of the rooms at home into a gym and I started joining the classes my instructor takes as well as doing our one on one sessions. It's just about finding what you like, fighting seems to be my thing.

    My shooting has improved A LOT. Especially when taking part in IPSC or IDPA type competitions where you need to run around a bit.
     
  9. 1919A4

    1919A4 New Member

    94
    0
    0
    Fitness is holistic. It improves every aspect of your life. When you're fit and you know it, you just feel better and life comes easier.

    Personally, I take pride in being able to chase down and catch Nike-wearing punk kids who sprint off like rabbits the moment my car door opens, and I'm twice their age, wearing boots and carrying a lot of gear.

    And catching them doesn't end it. You need to arrive at the scene of the fight with enough energy to win it.

    I'm slowing down a bit--can't help it--but I still have the endurance to keep going, and as long as I can keep them in sight, I can close the distance when they tire from their sprinting. I run daily and most of the criminal class doesn't and it makes a difference.
     
  10. ranger_sxt

    ranger_sxt New Member

    333
    0
    0
    Just working on soft skills (counter-surveillance, survival, awareness, etc.) is not all that you need. You should keep yourself in shape, be able to go walk/run for long distances, fight with knives, sticks and open hands.

    If your belly gets in the way of you performing everyday activities, you will be more of a liability in a fight than a force-multiplier.

    If your only tool to deal with problems is your gun, you will be **** out of luck when you can't deploy it anymore.

    If your "practice" session involves dumping your magazine/cylinder at one target without moving, you will wind up lying on the ground, bleeding and watching your adversary rifle through your pockets.

    If you cannot engage targets closer than 7 yards with your pistol, or 25 yards with your rifle, you will either watch an attacker kill your loved ones, or kill people who don't need killing.

    There is an overwhelming concept in the firearms community that all you need to do is carry your pistol and suddenly you will be superman, capable of taking on whole slews of badguys. It is continually shown, over and over, through force-on-force work and dashcam videos, that the badguys, be they jihadists, cartel soldiers, or just regular criminals, have a whole-force concept. They have several tools in their arsenal with which to intimidate, coerce, or just plain kill. The gun community continually ignores this reality.

    Specialization is for insects.
     
  11. 1919A4

    1919A4 New Member

    94
    0
    0
    Yep. I used to know a guy who carried two to THREE (yes, three) 1911 pistols on his person at all times because he believed that one day he'd wind up in a gunfight that was so intense that he would not have time to reload any gun that ran dry. So he carried a minimum of two and quite often, three.

    This "tacti-fool" had never been in the military or taken any sort of training, armed or unarmed, and he was also overweight and in such poor shape that walking up a normal flight of stairs made him huff and puff.

    I told him once that he was nothing more than three free pistols to the first thug that merely pushed him over. He didn't talk to me after that.
     
  12. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

    8,358
    4
    0
    Bump for reminder.
     
  13. Laufer

    Laufer New Member

    243
    0
    0
    To all combat (and support) personnel, both military and civilian, you have my respect.
    Very interesting info from you guys.

    1919:
    Your chase comments reminded me of a question I've needed to ask for months.

    For middle-aged guys (54) who run 25-30 minutes about 3-5 days per week, mostly on dirt trails winter through summer, is it true that jogging while carrying a 5-lb. tree branch would not improve cardio-vascular fitness?
    It accelerates the heart quicker, but not better for a given time span?

    My wife read that somewhere and she is a well-organized type 1 diabetic, who reads some articles in the diabetic magazine.
    If not better during a run, then how about carrying extra weight during a nice one hour fast walk?
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2009
  14. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

    8,358
    4
    0
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Laufer [​IMG]
    For middle-aged guys (54) who run 25-30 minutes about 3-5 days per week, mostly on dirt trails winter through summer, is it true that jogging while carrying a 5-lb. tree branch would not improve cardio-vascular fitness?
    It accelerates the heart quicker, but not better for a given time span?

    My wife read that somewhere and she is a well-organized type 1 diabetic, who reads some articles in the diabetic magazine.
    If not better during a run, then how about carrying extra weight during a nice one hour fast walk?




    First of all, let me say, welcome to the half century club. :D I personally supplement my runs and walks with a weighted vest. I can adjust the weight and most importantly, the weight is distributed on my upper body and shoulders front and back and is beneficial in building strength and stamina conditioning both cardiovascular and your lower body and legs.

    Here is a link that explains the cardio exercise and strength benefits of using a weighted vest. I hope this helps. I was to lazy to explain it and this site did a great job of pointing out all the health benefits and some cautions. :rolleyes:

    Wearing a Weighted Vest While Doing Cardio - LoveToKnow Exercise

    Jack
     
  15. Ubergopher

    Ubergopher New Member

    1,210
    0
    0
    I've got to disagree on the use of a weighted vest for running for running just for the fitness of it. I'd either recommend increasing the frequency or intensity of the same work out.

    When I was in my best shape (5:30 mile PR, average about 5:50ish) I'd occasionally wear a weighted vest for up hill sprints. It'd help me during the sprint at the end of a race when you're dead tired, or during the entire 800m (I did cross country and track)

    If you're just plain sick of running I'd suggest a new cardio activity.
    Walking would work with a vest, or a ruck sack. Another cardio exercise I can't suggest enough is swimming. That ****'ll tire you out and there's no impact on your joints.
     
  16. ta1588

    ta1588 New Member

    344
    0
    0
    I've been in and out of gyms and martial arts my whole life (started with tae kwon do, then karate, finally boxing) though if I don't have someone kicking me in the pants to motivate me I'm usually too lazy to get off my butt and work out. I know what to do and how to do it I just need to know how to stay motivated! Does anyone have any suggestions or maybe wanna take up a job as my personal trainer? :D
     
  17. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

    1,257
    0
    0
    I had the same problem for years, I'd train hard for a while and then slowly start to loose interest.

    A personal trainer worked well for me, I had one for a year and he really helped me out. He also helped me find the right sport and the right gym. Now I'm waking up at 6:30 so I can go all the way to across the city and train before going to work, which is something I've never thought I'd do.

    MMA is really fun, but the group I train with is the reason I keep going to the gym. It's a small place, owned by one of the teachers. Feels like working out at home.

    Almost every gym and martial arts academy offers a free lesson or two, hit a few and you'll eventually find one you like.
     
  18. Louisville

    Louisville New Member

    27
    0
    0
    If you are not motivated, then you are not motivated. If you can't push yourself to get out and go, then you won't get out and go. If you are not enjoying it, then you will hit a brick wall you can't get through.

    No one can tell you how you can get yourself motivated. However something that might work is find a big athletic guy in a half way house and tell him you will give him fifty bucks a week to run behind you screaming "If I catch you Im gonna f%#* you.".

    When I turned about 26 I noticed it was getting more and more difficult to stay in shape. This helped me break through that wall. Every day I would go out and run for an hour. Same course every day. I would run out for a half an hour, then back. Every day I would try to get just a little farther on the way out. Even if it was only two feet more it was improvement.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2010
  19. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

    8,358
    4
    0
    How Personality Traits Affect Your Fitness Goals

    July 25th, 2008 • Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen

    Your personality traits affect your fitness goals, which can lead to increased or decreased weight loss and your own personal goals to achieving a strong, healthy body and future healthy lifestyle. The key to achieving your fitness goals is to find an exercise plan that suits your personality and lifestyle. Here are a few tips on personality traits and fitness goals, plus how to find the exercise plan that works for you.

    Why is knowing your personality traits so important when it comes to achieving fitness goals?

    Because “the stress of engaging in exercise that is not of our choosing can outweigh its health benefits,” says Dr Pierce Howard in The Owner’s Manual for the Brain.

    If you’re forcing yourself to go to the gym because your sister is a personal trainer or your partner works out every day, you could actually be harming your health (and you definitely won’t be achieving your fitness goals). For instance, Norman Cousins was told to walk on a treadmill; he found dramatic health improvements only when he chose to walk on a track instead, which he preferred. The most effective way to achieve your fitness goals is to work with your personality traits.

    How Personality Traits Affect Your Fitness Goals
    If you choose fitness goals that suit your personality traits, you’ll not only be physically and emotionally healthier – you’ll also be more motivated to achieve your goals. Since 60% of people drop out of exercise programs within six months, finding your exercise personality is key to getting and staying fit.

    The connection between personality traits and fitness goals
    University of Florida researchers studied how the Big Five Personality Traits affect exercise habits and fitness goals. Here’s what they found:

    Extroverts - prefer intense workouts with groups of people, and are prone to exercising fairly often. Scientist Amy Hagan said, “These excitement-craving people love lots of activity, and want to go, go, go.” Extroverts also prefer to listen to music while exercising – it helps them achieve fitness goals.

    Introverts - tend to like to run, cycle, or work out alone. They find groups of people draining, so their fitness goals need to involve” me” time.

    Neurotic people - are least likely to exercise. Ironically, they’re most in need of exercise because it reduces anxiety and depression. Neurotic people tend to do cardiovascular exercises indoors, but not in a gym. They prefer home treadmills and low-intensity workouts when achieving their fitness goals.

    Conscientious people - are motivated enough to schedule their own fitness plan – and stick to it. Hagan said, “These are very self-disciplined people who strive to achieve something. They want to take charge of their own exercise routine to make sure it will get done.”

    Agreeable people - like to exercise first thing in the morning, to get it over with. Since they’re compliant and friendly, they have a tendency to help others and acquiesce to requests – which can derail their fitness goals.

    Questions That Reveal Your Personality Traits and Fitness Goals
    You don’t need a personality test to determine how to get and stay motivated. Simply answering these questions can help you find the exercise plan that works for you.

    1. Do I prefer working out in the morning, at lunch, or after supper?
    2. Do I want to learn something new, or stick with my favorite activities?
    3. Am I motivated by a personal trainer or people working out nearby?
    4. Do I like to work out alone, so I can set my own pace?
    5. Is exercising my way of socializing and meeting new people?
    6. Do I like to schedule my exercise into my day, or spontaneously choose an activity?
    Are you an introvert or an extrovert – and do your personality traits affect your fitness goals?


    I thought this article might help, I personally think one needs to be self motivated, disciplined, and stay aggressive to achieve self-set personal health goals and constantly strive to improve one's self through various combination's of weight bearing and cardiovascular exercises, whether it be running, organized sports or physical contact sports.

    Muscle responds to shock treatments and the incorporation of a change up of different routines, say every two to three months, this will result in a muscle growing bigger and stronger in response. Small improvements gained weekly, will lead to overall greater physical and health results and improvements in self-control of one's blood pressure, cholesterol levels, proper weight, mind and body, and especially, your own personal self-confidence.


    Jack
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2010
  20. Jon Weiler

    Jon Weiler New Member

    15
    0
    0
    Functional Fitness

    Functional fitness is the key to success in practical shooting. This is the entire body, to include strength and stamina. Many people forget that fact and opt to the 3 set of 10 mindset, working the muscles that look good. A good physique is a by product of a functional fitness regiment.

    Crossfit has been a growing trend for this style of fitness and I think it's a good start. The mindset is focused on a functional fitness, but the delivery can be improved on. The Olympic lifts will increase both strength and stamina, but must be done with strict form or else you will get hurt. I have learned that the hard way. I don't think there is enough focus on form with most Crossfit affiliates.

    I also believe that competition and working against the clock are good for results in a daily workout, but again it can force sloppy lifts that can injure. I like Military Athlete's approach because it takes the functional fitness to the next level. I have a good friend of mind, who is also one of our instructors, who is opening up a gym with this same concept in Birmingham. His is Combat Fitness and he and I have been trading workouts for a little over a year now.

    Fitness is a big part of my daily activities and my approach to our training courses. Sgt. Miller is exactly right that to be good involves more than just putting rounds down on the range. The firearm is an extension of the body, which is an extension of the mind. So there is a chain of events working and each link needs to be honed to ensure that everything comes together the way it should. When you condition the body in a functional way, you also condition the mind.

    My two cents on that. Check out our blog on the site. We'll be focusing on fitness too, along with shooting stuff.