First time shotgun purchase

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by nipanthers52, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. nipanthers52

    nipanthers52 New Member

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    I'm new to hunting and gun owning and looking for a good multi-purpose 12 ga shotgun. Will use it mainly for deer hunting but will probably use it for some waterfowl as well. I'm new to the hunting world do don't need something crazy expensive but want a reliable gun that will get the job done for years to come! Any ideas\recommendations?
     
  2. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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  3. Georgiahunter

    Georgiahunter New Member

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    Remington 870. Why not introduce yourself in the intro. section.
     
  4. gmaster456

    gmaster456 New Member

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    Mossberg 500/535. Also look at the Benelli Nova
     
  5. nipanthers52

    nipanthers52 New Member

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    I've heard some mixed reviews on the Remington 870. I know it's an old staple but have you heard of any issues with it jamming? Also, where is the into section? I'll head out there! :) What do you think of the Winchester SX3?
     
  6. nipanthers52

    nipanthers52 New Member

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    Also, should have clarified...looking at semi-autos! Thanks everyone!
     
  7. JMat

    JMat New Member

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    Im also looking for my first shotgun and im looking at 2 12 gauges an 870 wood stock for 309$ and a supernova for 459$ with a synthetic stock. I like the weight of the 870, the supernova with the synthetic stock just feels too light. Whats do you "experienced" guys think? Pros and cons.. etc.
     
  8. JMat

    JMat New Member

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    Sorry not trying to highjack your thread.
     
  9. JPGunworks

    JPGunworks New Member

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    I believe Remington 870's and Mossberg 500's are the workhorse shotguns of American law enforcement. These two shotguns can be used in many applications and have many aftermarket accessories and options available. One reason that these shotguns are so versatile is that by opening the action halfway and unscrewing the tubular magazine catch, the barrels can be switched out, often with just a simple tug. This allows you to use the same gun to shoot sabot slug, buckshot, target load, and breaching rounds. I believe both of these guns run in the $350 to $500 range brand new and may include a second barrell.

    I'm partial to the Marine Corps' Benelli M-4 but the civilian version carries a price tag of around $1400. My brother-in-law recently bought a Mossberg Maverick for around $120(?). It felt like a much cheaper quality firearm and only held two rounds in the magazine, but some of the same aftermarket parts for the Mossberg 500 fit the Maverick. It may be an excellent starter shotgun if the barrels are also interchangeable, I would definitely do my research before buying one though. I doubt that they hold much resale value.

    Just remember not to shoot a rifled slug through your mod. choke barrel, it severely degrades the performance of your choke. I've run into several military guys and average joes who didn't know what a choke was or how it worked. At one time, I was that guy. hence the word of caution.
     
  10. gmaster456

    gmaster456 New Member

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    The maverick only held 2 rounds because the manufacturer puts a wooden dowel in the magazine to adhere to individual states hunting laws. Its very simple to remove and once you do, you can hold up to 5 shells in the magazine. As for not firing slugs through a mod choke, in my opinion, thats just hearsay. I have had no issues with the performance on my choke after firing rifled slugs out if it and accuracy was fine. I also know many people who do the same with no problems.
     
  11. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    You can get a Franchi or Beretta in that price range.
     
  12. gmaster456

    gmaster456 New Member

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    Remington 870 Pros:
    -Cheaper starting price Price
    -More Accessories
    -Many Configurations
    -Reliable Workhorse

    Remington 870 Cons:

    -Shell elevator can pinch your fingers when loading the gun
    -Lower end models don't have very good quality finish, causing the gun to easily rust
    -You have to bring the action back a little bit harder to eject a shell

    Benelli Supernova Pros:
    -Better layout (personal)
    -Lockable shell elevator (Won't get your fingers pinched loading shells)
    -Nicer Action (My opinion)
    -3 1/2 chamber gives you more versatility. And unlike some other guns that accept 3 1/2 shells, this one will also reliably cycle 2 3/4 loads
    -Push button shell stop (allows you to eject a shell from the chamber, and place another one in the chamber, with out the magazine feeding out another shell as well, causing the firearm to jam)
    -Reliable

    Benelli Supernova cons:
    -Higher Starting Price
    -Less accessories
    -You can't swap out stocks
    -Expensive Barrels

    Really you can't go wrong with either gun and its mostly just a matter of preference. Hope this helps.
     
  13. JMat

    JMat New Member

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    Thanks for the input. It seems like for the extra 150 bucks or so there are more pros. My only concern with the supernova is that synthetic stock feeling so light. Has anyone had any problems with the stock breaking/cracking/ or anything with them? It just felt really light to me.
     
  14. gmaster456

    gmaster456 New Member

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    None that I have heard of. But with ANY gun, there are bound to be a handful of people who have had problems.
     
  15. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    I shoot 3.5 inch turkey loads in my Benelli SBE with a synthetic stock, your shoulder will break before the stock does.
     
  16. gmaster456

    gmaster456 New Member

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    Agreed!! :D
     
  17. JPGunworks

    JPGunworks New Member

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    Thanks for the tip about the wooden dowel. My brother-in-law in Georgia said that he coudn't get the thing open; I wasn't sure if it was because he didn't read the manual or because it wasn't possible to open. He'll be glad to know.

    As for the slugs through a modified choke, I just spent the last half an hour searching the internet for information proving me right. Turns out I'm wrong, 25 year gunsmiths and 45 year shotgun shooters agree that slugs through modified and even full choked barrels don't damage the choke or cause a safety hazard in any way.

    Thanks for the education.
     
  18. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    With up to 3-1/2" loads, I would look hard at the gas operated semi autos. I cannot abide inertia operation, but some people like them, too. To me they cost too much money for what you get, and without the two piece stocks and such they kick like mules. And in case one should think I am too recoil sensitive, before tungsten I shot a specially lightened (read machined) 10 gauge BPS. And the gas operated guns are much more likely to reliably cycle with lighter shells than the 3-1/2" Roman candles, in fact you see quite a few on the Sporting Clays range even. I just shoot a 3" 12 now for waterfowl, and a Remington 1100 does fine.
    Among 3-1/2" gas guns, the Winchesters, Brownings, Berettas, and Remington Versamax is where I would look. Yes, there are cheaper alternatives, but they don't appear to be as trouble free in my experience. Everyone will trumpet their favorite, but to be honest, they all work pretty darned well. They all have different features, but you need to decide which suit you best. You just have to see which one feels best to you, and then decide which finish you want. Enjoy the process and good luck.