first time gun owner/cpl

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by shelbs687, Sep 7, 2012.

  1. shelbs687

    shelbs687 New Member

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    So I just moved to a new house with a friend of mine. I live with another female, in the middle of the woods. We are in our 20's, and I would feel a lot safer with some sort of protection in the house. I grew up in a family of hunters, and have been around guns my whole life. I'm looking at getting a hand gun, and I'm curious what features I should look for...or perhaps a good gun to start with. I'm getting my CPL shortly, so I would like to start looking for guns.
     
  2. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    IMO, a pump shotgun with a 19 to 20 inch barrel should be first choice for protection in the home. One in each bedroom.

    Mossberg, Remington 870, 12 or even 20 guage.

    For a handgun, find a local gunshop that stocks lots of choices and find one that fits you, size, weight, color, etc. Springfield Armory, Glock, Ruger, Smith & Wesson, Bersa, Sig Sauer, plus many more great choices.

    My wife chose the S&W J frame Airweight 5 shot 38 spl.

    Revolvers are certainly worthy of consideration.

    Also, consider getting a dog. Dogs are excellent an deterrent for criminal intentions.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012

  3. ineverFTF

    ineverFTF New Member

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    For cheap, powerful home defense.

    It doesnt bet better than the remington 870.

    12 ga would be best, but if it is uncomfortable a 20 with 3in magnums would suffice.
     
  4. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    good advise from all. Now see who owns anything handgun that you can pull the trigger on after getting some basic gun handeling info. What you can shot and control can have to do with hand size or physical limits and what you can get you head into. Deside if you are going to cc on your body then you need something you hide well . Might be a 380 pocket gun or as large as a bersa single or double sack on up to 38sp and 9mm. Just lay your hands on all that you can at first in a gun shop. Maybe you can find gun folks from a forum that are near you will let you shoot there handguns too. Many states also have there own fourms for shooters or defence. I meet a shooter a few weeks back to,let her shoot most of mine.

    A 20ga mossberg 500 would make for a good home defence gun. Depend on your size a full or the bantam or adjustable super bantam will work best.
     
  5. genesis

    genesis New Member

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    Hi Shelbs. I've been shooting and reloading for over 40 years and I've won more than my fair share of competitive IPSC (International Practical Shooting Confederation) matches, and bowling pin shoots. I'm also a teacher, but my job isn't to teach. My job is to facilitate each individuals unique learning experience. You're gonna get lots of responses based on myth, opinion, and personal preference. So take any comments and recommendations (including mine) with a grain of salt.

    Using a gun is nothing at all like what we see in the movies. Contrary to popular opinion and myth, unless you're trained on how to use a shot gun in tight quarters, it probably isn't a good choice.

    As to handguns, auto's have one advantage, capacity. Revolvers also have an advantage, simplicity and reliability. I have both, but I keep a revolver next to my bed at night. But for carry, I use an auto because it's easier to conceal then any of my revolvers. With revolvers you don't have to worry about safeties or jams or malfunctions. Ya pull the trigger and it goes BANG!

    We bought my 67 year old girlfriend a Ruger LCR revolver in 38 Special ($399). They also make this model in 357 magnum ($499). We also bought my girlfriend the LCR in 22 caliber ($449). Super cheap to practice with, and that's the key, PRACTICE! My girlfriend has learned to handle her revolvers very well. Contrary to popular myth, a snubbie or mouse gun is not hard to shoot or inaccurate. The Ruger LCR is light as a potato chip, reliable as dirt, has a butter smooth trigger pull, and accurate as all heck. Plus, if you're walking around the woods, you could drop it in your pocket and you would forget it's there. It quite literally is that light! Its lightness does mean it recoils more than a heavier gun. But if my girlfriend can master it, so can you.

    Don't get to caught up with caliber. All of today's modern, state-of-the-art, common self defense ammo in any caliber is more than capable of getting the job done and with plenty of authority. Even the diminutive little 380 can be a potent caliber. I'd suggest a 9MM or 38 special to start out with. If you're comfortable shooting larger calibers, go for it. But maybe a 22 is the biggest you're comfortable with. Then go with that. The most important thing is not the caliber. The most important thing is skill (both practical and tactical) and presence of mind. I'd venture to say that 98% of gun owners would lose big time in a confrontation because they don't know how to handle their gun in a defensive/tactical situation. They live under a false sense of security. They would score miserably in a competitive defensive tactical match (I did when I first started competing), which is no where near the pressure and fear they would experience in a real life confrontation. Just think about what you would do if you heard an intruder at night. What specific action would you take? Would you stay put, or go looking for him? Are there other people in the house? Are there neighbors close by? Are you near a phone? What's the difference between cover and concealment? Each situation and scenario is different. You need to have a plan. But some get lucky, and every now and then we hear of Grama, who without any instruction, shoots an intruder. Even a blind squirrel finds a nut once in awhile.

    If you've been around guns all your life, you may already be familiar with autos. If so then an auto is certainly a viable option. It all depends on your personal preference. You should get what YOU like. There is a plethora of extremely fine choices in today's market. Try to find a shooting range that rents guns so you can try some different types.

    Go to youtube and do a search on any gun you're interested in. You will find a bazillion excellent gun review videos there. I've included a few below.

    Merely having a gun will not save your buns unless you become proficient with it, and that takes practice, practice, practice, and more practice. This is where a good 22 comes in for lots of cheap practice. And that practice needs to be much more than just target shooting. You'll need to practice defensive drills over and over and over, including quickly clearing all manner of malfunctions, and reloading quickly. You need to master these skills. But target shooting is where you start. Either find a knowledgeable shooter who has lots of patients and is a good instructor, our take some shooting classes. But don't get paranoid about this stuff. Just have fun with it.

    Remember, the first rule in a gun fight is you have to have a gun ! And that suggestion about getting a dog really is an excellent one which you should very seriously consider. A barking dog may well be your best defense. It doesn't have to be a big dog. Just one that barks when it hears something outside.

    Enjoy the journey, happy shooting, and be safe.

    Semper Fi

    Don <><

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BmpQqtBAVc"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BmpQqtBAVc[/ame]

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B68ILSzggTc&feature=related"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B68ILSzggTc&feature=related[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012
  6. shelbs687

    shelbs687 New Member

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    Thank you. Like I said I have been around guns my whole life. I feel comfortable with then and the safety aspect has been stressed over and over.

    The first gun my dad ever had me shoot was a 44mag. I wasnt expecting that, but it was a good experience. I've got a lot of research to do, but thats for ther advice
     
  7. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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    Semper Fi Don, nice write up.
     
  8. gearhead396

    gearhead396 New Member

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    Yes don is right on the money I dont think anything needs to be added
     
  9. genesis

    genesis New Member

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    Hi Silverado. From one Gunny (E7, Chu Lia, Viet Nam) to another. SEMPER FI.
     
  10. shelbs687

    shelbs687 New Member

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    Haha thanks Marines ;) it was a lot of help.

    Thanks for all you do.
     
  11. armed1212

    armed1212 New Member

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    Go 9mm, low recoil n high capacity. Ruger sr9c, XDM, glock ect. U dont gotta break da bank but dont go cheap. .380 isnt bad either my sister has a bersa 380 n she loves it, that one stay in her nightstand. try as many as u can n dont fall into the hype of big calibers.