First pistol

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by maso157, Apr 20, 2013.

  1. maso157

    maso157 New Member

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    So I got to go pistol shooting for my birthday yesterday and I got to shoot a beretta 92. I loved the feel of that gun. I also shot a glock but the back of the grip was uncomfortable and actually dug into my hand a little while shooting. I also shot a mark 1 22 pistol. That was fun as well but in the way that 22s are.

    So I'm also enrolled in ROTC and a friend of mine is also joining the military. I want to learn to shoot pistol and rifle proficiently by the time I go to actual training and for recreation of course.

    Now my question after all this explanation is would it be better for me to get a 22 pistol so I can go shooting more but with a gun farther from what is used in military
    Or
    Should I get a 9 mm which would be closer to what I would use in the military but I wouldn't be able to afford as much ammunition?

    Thanks for the help ahead of time! I really appreciate this community
     
  2. fordracing

    fordracing Member

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    Get both Save some coin and you may be able to get two used handguns for around $500
     

  3. maso157

    maso157 New Member

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    Also if I do get a used handgun, what should I check for?
     
  4. onenut58

    onenut58 New Member

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    The way things are going its hard to get ammo cheap for a 9 mm or a 22 or even find it in some places.
     
  5. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    There are a few pistols that can be purchased with a kit that will allow you to use .22LR in a 9mm pistol. The CZ75b can be modified with their "kadet kit" to shoot .22LR and then switched back to 9mm very easily/quickly.
     
  6. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Look at this in two ways.
    1. Buy the 9mm you really want, the military is going to train you on the 92 anyways.
    or
    2. Buy a 92, because, you should "beware of the man with only one gun."
     
  7. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    This would be an EXCELLENT idea if he had the dough to drop $750-$800, I would be all over this, but OP seems to be a little short on cash.

    I personally would get the 9mm you want, shoot when you can afford ammo and dry fire a lot when you can't.
     
  8. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I hear you; i wanted the kadet kit to go with my cz-75b, but i couldn't justify the cost when i have other .22's already.
     
  9. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    Once .22 ammo becomes cheap again I'll probably justify buying it :D
     
  10. fordracing

    fordracing Member

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    I've only bought one used handgun in my lifetime (Astra A-90) and it was mint condition.
    My advice for buying used handguns would be look for cleanliness. If it was taken care of, it should be obvious.
    How about a new 9mm and a used .22 revolver? Take a look at prices at Buds.com or Gunbroker.
     
  11. BeyondTheBox

    BeyondTheBox New Member

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    Action parts. Rack the slide several times, lock it back if it has a lock, make sure it holds. Do a field strip, look the parts over and ensure no obvious gouging in metal and that the finish looks reasonably even. Wear will be normal but anything abnormal would be obvious. Don't look at it as a gun, look at it as you would anything metal. Ensure no warping. Ask if you can dryfire.

    If online, use seller ratings and ask questions like the ones above. An honest seller would respond. If they say it shot fine last they used it then you're probably good.

    No matter what is a crap shoot, but I've yet to have a bad experience.
     
  12. maso157

    maso157 New Member

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    God I love this forum. Thank you all so much! For your responses already. So I will plan on buying a 9 mm. I got about two hundred towards it in birthday money that I can put towards. Plus I got paid. So I'm probably up to about 300 dollars right now. I'll have to start looking at all the gun shops around town. If any of you see any sweet deals it would be a huge help if you posted them here or sent me a message.
     
  13. 1911love

    1911love New Member

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    Look for a M9A1. Last I checked they were in the $500 range around my neck of the woods, Florida.
     
  14. maso157

    maso157 New Member

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    just curious why dry fire? I always thought that was bad for guns ?
     
  15. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    If you have to ask, then get the 22 first. Then buy the 9 next. Then buy a 45. Then buy a 357. Then buy...

    Do you get the point?

    Everyone needs a 22. It allows you to shoot the most at the least cost. Go try a lot of them.

    Don't get hung up on those who say you have to buy this brand or that brand. There's a reason there are many successful firearms manufacturers. Because they all make some great guns. Primarily it depends how the gun feels to you.

    Just don't buy a Glock. ;)
     
  16. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    Rimfires, yes, it is not good for the gun.

    Modern center fires, no, you're safe dry firing.
     
  17. BeyondTheBox

    BeyondTheBox New Member

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    I'd keep it at a minimum. Rimfire is worse because the firingpin will gouge the end of the chamber. Some centerfire are bad too, the firingpin may have a shoulder on it that hits the end of the firingpin channel if no round there to strike and stop it from going all the way through. Not sure how many guns have this, think it's a common problem with older SAO semiautomatics with cheap design in the inertial firingpins. Not really sure though. More educated could help there.
     
  18. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    Snap caps^^ :) and dry fire practice just allows you to perfect a good tigger pull without going through ammo. Range time with live rounds are invaluable but it you simply can't afford it then its better then nothing.
     
  19. BeyondTheBox

    BeyondTheBox New Member

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    I simply don't recommend dry firing ever. The point of having a gun is to have it available for self defense to me and this means it should be loaded. If you're constantly unloading it to dry fire it you're constantly having to reload it and that can cause some major bullet recess. Now you can cycle the rounds to help prevent that, but honestly I think the whole practice and dry fire thing is so blown out of proportion. Unnecessary practice to me, but to each their frantic overthetop own.
     
  20. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    I fully agree with the aspect of using a gun for self defense and having it loaded all the time. With that said, if someone was to break into my house while I was practicing my trigger pull by dry firing it would take me a total of 2-4 seconds to throw in one of the loaded magazines and chamber a live round. It would most likely give me a sight picture equal to or quicker this way than me getting up of the couch and drawing from the holster.

    I just don't see where you are coming from, honestly. Maybe you own striker fired handguns that you need to rack the slide for every pull. My personal pistol is a SA/DA with a hammer, so I can practice holding steady on a long DA pull while also practice a strait back trigger pull on the SA pull. I don't see this frantic or over-the-top in any shape or form. Please explain