First Aid Kit List

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by improvised_prepper, Apr 23, 2013.

  1. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    Here is my FAK (first aid kit), I will list the supplies and the pouch it's carried in. My kit is fairly basic with a few, more advanced items. In yours, IMO everyone should have one, you should carry what you know how to use. Having extra stuff that you aren't trained or capable of using will just take up extra space that could be used for stuff that runs out quickly in an event you need your kit, for example; gauze, band aids, tape etc...



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    Here is everything as you open the pouch

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    I like to call this area my trauma slot
    This holds my:
    1- pair trauma shears
    4- 4x4 gauze
    2- packets of 6 stri-strips (12 total)
    4- small occlusive bandages (Tegaderm)
    1-large Quickclot
    1- ABD pad (1-2 Maxi pads will work)
    2- sutures
    1- pair of needle holders
    1- space blanket
    1- pair of tweezers (not pictured- I forgot to pull them out)
    1- pen for notepad
    1- Swiss rescue tool http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000PX0LKG


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    This middle slot holds:
    1- bendable splint http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000FPGGC6
    1- ace bandage
    2- triangle bandages
    1- notepad
    1- bulkee bandage
    2- full lengths of koban wrapped around a tongue depressor
    1- roll of medical tape wrapped around the same tongue depressor
    1- set of bent tip needle holders



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    Last but not least, the boo-boo pouch.
    This holds:
    Medication- it's running low and needs to be restocked but it will carry:
    20 aspirin tablets
    10 Benadryl tablets- original
    20 acetaminophen tablets
    20 ibuprofen tablets
    5 Percocet tablets
    5 phenergan tablets
    10 Imodium tablets

    1- performance energy power bar (hypoglycemia)
    1- bottle of water purification tablets
    5- alcohol wipes
    5- bug sting wipes w/ lidocaine
    5- antiseptic wipes
    10- small bactrim
    4- ammonia salts (smelling salts)

    That should be everything :) if you have any input or questions just let me know and I'll answer to the best of my ability. I hope this helps!

    Edit: I forgot the pouch, it's the Condor Rip-away EMT pouch.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B003TPNG5E
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013
  2. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    I would also add a 20cc empty syringe to flush wounds, small packets of iodine or an eye dropper full (bigger bottles tend to find a way to bust open and ruin every thing) and some q-tips might be useful.
     

  3. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    i am not a prepper, but first aid is a must.
    Thanks.
     
  4. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    No problem man, I hope it helps!
     
  5. Doc3402

    Doc3402 New Member

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    I'm lost on the ammonia salts. I know of no practical use that you couldn't replicate by elevating the lower extremities. Am I missing something? Can you put it in solution? If so it's great for jelly fish stings.

    I would also get a TSA friendly bottle or two of peroxide to go with that 20cc syringe, and knock the 20 down to 2x 10cc. You might also consider some eye wash unless I missed it. Oh yeah. Adolph's Meat Tenderizer. It's better than Mom's spit for minor bites and stings. I think we just went from a belt pack to a carry bag. Sorry.
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Suggestion- tuck contents of each 3rd into a large ziplock baggy. Will keep stuff dry if YOU go in the water. Bags can also be used as a water holder, airtight dressing over a sucking chest wound, or (big enough) as an emergency hat to reduce heat loss from head by a shock victim. Put a pinhole in a water bag, and you can flush an eye with a small, steady stream of water for a long time. Would add couple of fast food packs of salt and of lemon juice for heat injury (electrolyte replacement).
     
  7. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    You probably could mix some solution with the salts, I haven't tried. Why would you rather have 2 10cc than 20cc? I would use the syringe and clean water for eye wash, for the sake of space. I'll need to pick up some of that tenderizer, how does that work? Thanks for your input, I'm still trying to maximize the efficiency.

    All the stuff that was laid out was taken out of their bags for display, they are about 3 bags in that little mesh pack :) they have these electrolyte packets that are pretty small I need to throw in
     
  8. Doc3402

    Doc3402 New Member

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    Your irrigation needs are going to be less than you think. With a 20cc syringe there will be a lot of waste. With 2 10cc syringes you still have 20cc available but you will only have to dirty one syringe if you need less. You can also use one of the syringes as a mini suction to keep a wound clean while you flush it with the other syringe. It helps to see what is still in there.

    The recommended eyewash solutions in order of preference are Boric Acid solution, Normal Saline, and water unless the contaminant is a caustic or acid. In that case reverse the order. Realistically, you won't be able to carry enough of any one of them to make a difference on a chemical contaminant. What the Boric Acid is for is more along the lines of grit or dirt. The Boric Acid is also soothing, it's a closer match to the pH of your tears, and if I remember correctly it is isotonic.

    For there to be a sting there must be a protein. Adolph's and Mom's spit break down the protein. Mom's spit contains the digestive enzyme amylase. I'm not sure what's in Adolph's, but when mixed into a paste it works great and stays on longer than spit. Yes, you can use spit to make the paste, but it's not needed.
     
  9. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    Ohhh ok that makes sense. Very cool! I'll have to pick some of that up. Is "moms spit" just spit or is it an actual product?
     
  10. Doc3402

    Doc3402 New Member

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    Mom's spit was a reference to the miracle properties of your mother's saliva. When mixed with dirt it makes a poultice for stings (amylase). When applied to her hankie it wipes off dirt and treats skinned knees. It is used to remove glue from stubborn labels and to train that stubborn cowlick. About the only things Mom's spit won't do is take rust off a chrome bumper and kill crabgrass.
     
  11. 1911love

    1911love New Member

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    Doc, with the EXP you bring to the table I'll be watching this thread closely. Thanks.
     
  12. Doc3402

    Doc3402 New Member

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    I don't know that I would do that. I have experience with what we carried in the truck, and I know what I had in my trunk bag, but when it comes to bug out kits I'm a babe in the woods. I have my hurricane kit to work with my hurricane plan, and that's it. I will try not to steer anybody wrong, but I'm going to miss some stuff. I may also tend to add stuff that would probably be a waste of space.

    I keep thinking about what happens when you take a doctor out of his environment. They get lost without all the help and resources they are accustomed to. Taking me as a paramedic and putting me in a basic life support truck is pretty much the same thing. Now here you guys are, and your even talking about doing away with the truck. How are you going to carry all this stuff? <grin>
     
  13. improvised_prepper

    improvised_prepper New Member

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    What's in your hurricane kit? And any info or tips you bring to us are going to be invaluable with your real life experience
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2013
  14. Doc3402

    Doc3402 New Member

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    My hurricane kit list probably won't help you much. We plan to bug out from one area of civilization to a dryer, less windy area of civilization. I have my list of pet friendly hotels located near hospitals that are in towns of 50,000 people or more. I don't carry first aid supplies, but I do carry food and foil for manifold cooking. I also carry water. Lots of water. Then I add more water and some Kool-Aid packages. Water gets really boring after a day or two.

    For a good first aid kit you have to know where you might be going and adapt the kit to that. You can break a leg anywhere, but a decent first aid kit will also be stocked for environmental emergencies. There is no sense packing a snake bite kit if being lost at sea is possible, and cold packs are kind of useless during winter in Alaska. If you're sitting on an island in the middle of a fresh water lake you need water purification tools, but in the desert you need water.

    Prepare for the things that will take you out of the survival game. Eyes, hands, feet. These are all critical for survival. How do you treat them? How do you protect them? Temperature. You have to maintain your core body temperature. Too high or too low will take you out of the game.

    Many people go to great lengths to prepare a kit and some food items, but what do you do if an injury takes you beyond your food prep? Do you know what you can eat in your area? Where and how do you find water? What plants can you eat, and what will kill you or make you sick? What does a brown recluse look like? Is that a coral snake or a king snake?

    Your best first aid kit and your best survival tool is located between your ears. If you're making a bug out bag and intend to stay local get with your county extension agent and get the plants and wildlife books for your area ahead of time. If it's a hiking vacation contact that local agent.

    Now this one is my personal opinion. I doubt a lot of people are this adamant about it. Every single first aid kit for outdoor use should have something in it that is used for starting wet wood fires. Magnesium shaving kits, fire tabs, fire paste, whatever. If you can't maintain your core temperature you probably won't survive.

    Did I see blister dressings in your initial kit?