Federal Premium .45 ACP 165 grain hydra-shok JHP

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by orangello, Dec 24, 2012.

  1. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I am soliciting opinions on this ammo for defensive purposes. I picked up a few boxes at Wallyworld the other day. I am not sure if this is what i had before; i know it was federal hydra-shok, but the weight seems a bit light for some reason.

    I also don't remember the last batch being "low recoil" ammo.

    http://www.federalpremium.com/products/details/handgun.aspx?id=405
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2012
  2. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The ad is a bit misleading. I do not think the writer has ever shot a gun. The Hyrda-Shok is a fairly traditional jacked hollow point bullet (a center post added). The "EFMJ" is a different bullet entirely.

    The 165 gr in a .45 is a light weight bullet. Recoil is more dependent on bullet weight than velocity. The 165 will recoil less than a 230, but will have significantly less sectional density and less penetration.
     

  3. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    But more velocity and energy.

    It's a good SD/HD round.
     
  4. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Thanks guys!

    Sounds like i'm gonna need a bear for some testing. ;)

    I did find the rounds i had before that i liked very much. http://www.midwayusa.com/product/36...in-hydra-shok-jacketed-hollow-point-box-of-20

    The only real difference i can SEE is the weight. Sounds like i need to order some of the heavies and do a side-by-side trial.



    I noticed when comparing to the last mag of the heavies that the line around the case (some kind of decorative crimp?) was lower on the heavies.
     
  5. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The cannelure in the case is to prevent the bullet from setting back into the case.

    Heavier bullets are longer, and therefore seated deeper, so the csnnelure needs to be farther back from the case neck,

    With modern methods of ammo manufacture, I often wonder if these case cannelures are there more for appearance than function.