Favorite Metal Firearm Finish???

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by danf_fl, Apr 18, 2018.

  1. Blue

    12 vote(s)
    52.2%
  2. Stainless

    10 vote(s)
    43.5%
  3. Plating of some sort

    1 vote(s)
    4.3%
  4. Painted on

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Just wondering what your favorite finish is for your favorite firearm?
     
  2. SanchoPanza

    SanchoPanza Well-Known Member

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  3. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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  4. Danoobie

    Danoobie Well-Known Member

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    Here in Humidity Central ("Florida" is Spanish for humidity) stainless is popular.
     
  5. IowaShooter

    IowaShooter Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Shiny stainless please

    0212181523.jpg
     
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  6. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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  7. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Maybe I'm behind the times but I don't mind putting in the effort involved with the much older technique of "rust bluing". I like the involvement and match-up of walnut and blued steel on a well designed, classic style rifle and the end result. I posted a picture of a VZ 24 Mauser I built for myself a while back, and I've done quite a few others for folks that thought my "doings" were better than my self-evaluations. Here's the Mauser:
    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]

    I do have several other pictures of Model 70 Winchesters that I built up when the short Model 70 action was first introduced, and it was only through encouragement from a few of my customers, that I started taking pictures of the end result. In the meantime there were a few who took advantage of my learning curve.
     
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  8. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    my personal preference is for blued steel, and a nice walnut stock. been that way for many years for me. but, i do appreciate what other materials and finishes have to offer as well. so, for me it's about matching finish or material to the intended purpose of the firearm.
     
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  9. 67stingray

    67stingray Active Member Supporter

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    Beautiful rifle SGW, I'm with you and Dallas. Deep rich blue.
     
  10. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Remember that Parkerizing is a form of plating
     
  11. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I think it is more a form of oxidation like bluing. Playing usually requires electrical current to bond metal to the surface of metal.

    Parkerizing is chemically building a crystalline structure on the metal.

    I like parkerizing and then a sprayed and naked on finish that is held to the metal by the pores in the crystalline structure of parkerizing. It bonds the spray finish to the metal better.
     
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  12. Viking

    Viking Well-Known Member

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    I browned the barrel of my TC blackpowder .50 and it's held up wonderfully over the years.
     
  13. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Blued and Stainless
     
  14. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Parkerizing is a conversion process based on a phosphoric acid bath with various trace metals, such copper, zinc, manganese, or iron. The color of the final coating is dependent on how much of which of these metals is in the solution, and the alloy composition of the steel. The green of WWII, resulted from coppers contaminating the zinc bath, and due to the shortages during the war, and accelerated production schedules, it was decided accept the “defective” finish.

    You heat the bath to just below boiling and submerge the steel parts. A chemical reaction occurs, and converts the surface of the steel into stable phosphate compounds. While this is occurring hydrogen is released, causing the bath to appear to be boiling at a low simmer. When the hydrogen release stops, the process has converted the surface of the part, and the process is complete. The part is then removed, rinsed and dried.