Factory Brass vs. “premium brass”

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by deg, Jan 25, 2014.

  1. deg

    deg Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    You guys have me entertaining reloading...

    Visiting with a buddy at work (too scared to use the word “partner” any longer) – he reloads and says to buy and use premium brasses rather than the thin factory brass. Any thoughts on that?
     
  2. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    My thought is boloney. Just use factory brass.
    Though I have to admit about 120 years ago or so they had heavy cartridge cases called 'everlast' or something but they never gained much popularity.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2014

  3. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    You have to be careful with the brass you use for reloading. Check brass with a magnet before buying any quantity of it. I have found "brass" shell casings that are rusting on my property.
     
  4. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Unless your shooting Benchrest competition,or just want to spend a lot of extra $$,there's really no reason to use "premium" brass like Lapua,unless they are the only mfg of the caliber you shoot.
    I personally don't care for Remington brass,I've always had problem with the necks splitting after a couple firings in several calibers.
    Hornady brass also has problems with the primer holes expanding prematurely on certain calibers,especially with their 6.5 Creedmoor brass.

    I've always prefered to use Winchester,Federal,Starline,and Lake City brass for most of the calibers I shoot,but I do like Nosler brass also,but it is a premium quality brass.
    If you set your dies up correctly,keep your brass trimmed,anneal,and don't push maximum charged loads,most brass will last for 10 loading's or more before it has run out of a useful life.
     
  5. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Premium brass like Lapua and Nosler is nice. IMHO NOT worth the extra money. Process the brass properly and sort by weight and it will give stellar performance.

    The only real advantage to "premium" brass is it has drilled flash holes that leave no burr in the case. The burr is easily removed. High dollar brass will fail at abot the same rate as "run of the mill" brass from Remington, WInchester, Federal or Hornady
     
  6. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I am very particular about my brass. I only use the free stuff I find on the ground at the range.:D
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    I'm fond of free ground brass as well. Free is good. Not a fan of remington lots of out of round primer holes. Not a fan of hornady they often cut the necks much shorter than spec. Everything else good to go.

    Brass doesn't rust it tarnishes. Long as there is no pitting it will cleanup.and shoot. Some calibers do have steel or aluminum cases but those are obvious.
     
  8. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    I like Mil-surp. brass the best.
     
  9. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    For what?

    For handgun use, it's irrelevant.
    For 99% of rifle use it's also irrelevant.
    For high end match use, I can see the potential desire. I suppose if you can measure the difference, it matters.
    Sorting by headstamp is my concession on this issue. For handgun use, I doubt it matters, but it makes me feel better.
     
  10. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    IME, proper inspection and cleaning of brass,

    prior to reloading, trumps origin or "quality"

    of brass. When possible, I try to keep brass in

    it's original boxes, after firing.

    When that's not doable, I segregate

    by brand and overall condition.
     
  11. bigjim

    bigjim New Member

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    Is premium brass better??? Yes and No. If you think it is then YOU will shot better. As far as use they are all the same. You will get maybe 4 or 5 uses out of a rifle case before it hits the scrap heap (maybe 7) unless you anneal the cases each time. Every time you put a case through a resizing die you work harden the case. After a number of uses the necks start to split.

    Unless you need competition quality components (bullets as well as cases) spending the extra money will only make you more accurate in your head and you might just shoot better.

    Jim
     
  12. deg

    deg Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    hunting out to around 400 yards.
     
  13. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    what are you hunting at 400 yards!!

    can you determine sex size and age antlers of a beastie at 400 yards?? most folks have trouble doing that at 100... shooting undersize, wrong sex, too young game animals will land you in jail and branded as a poacher.
     
  14. deg

    deg Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Orix in NM
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2014
  15. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    You can build premium quality ammo on less pedigreed cases that will shoot as well or better than the best factory ammo out there (with appropriate load development, of course.) Ultra special expensive cases might make one feel better, but out of even a really excellent hunting rig, the difference will likely be extremely hard to spot, it it's even there. Be selective with the cases you have, or buy some Winchester or mainstream stuff. Be very careful with your process, and I believe the results will meet or exceed your expectations. So many other things matter as much, or more than the brand of brass you use.
     
  16. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I can scope it out to 400 yards. I can usually tell the sex,

    count the antlers, etc.

    But with my skill, at this time,I don't consider a 400 yard shot on a game

    animal, such as deer or elk, ethical.( unless you are

    a MUCH better shooter than I am)

    But I think anyone who isn't looking for game at 400 yards

    is a fool, for wasting his own time. I am constantly scoping

    out to the extent of my vision.
     
  17. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Even if I can make the shot I am not dragging any large critter 400 yards. Most of the places I hunt driving your truck/4 wheeler off the path will wear out your welcome quick.
     
  18. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    This is your answer.
    It all boils down to "for What" you are loading and "for What" you intend to do with the ammo.

    Without your specific needs we cannot accurately answer your question.
     
  19. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Unless you have the knowledge,experience,and equipment to try hunting at those types of ranges,I'd stick with 200 yards or less for game animals.

    With the correct equipment,determining all of those is pretty easy to do. Having the ability to take game at that distance and farther does require a lot of time behind the trigger,and lots of homework on ballistics.

    You're correct on constantly scanning around for game,but shooting game at long distances just takes trigger time at shooting at longer ranges,and knowing your ballistics.
    We shoot a lot during the spring and summer at the ranch,and shoot at a 12" round 1/2" plate,from 300 yards out to 1000 yards.
    Practice,practice,practice. Plus we have plenty of hogs and coyotes to practice on at all kinds of ranges.

    You need to find some better places to hunt,if the landowners ***** about driving a 4 wheeler out to retrieve downed game. Damaging the property is one thing,but using a 4 wheeler to get a shot animal back to camp is a very common thing around here.
     
  20. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I don't consider it proper to drive a vehicle of any kind in a field. That field is the landowners living. I can tell you right now, if someone drives into my pastures hunting rights will be the least of their problems.