F-T/R Bipod

Discussion in 'Competition Shooting' started by Allenvdb, Jan 30, 2017.

  1. Allenvdb

    Allenvdb New Member

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    Hey everyone,

    A few months ago I finally purchased the rifle that I plan to use for long range shooting which is a Remington SPS .308 with the 26" Varmit contour barrel. I have been tossing around the idea of trying out F-T/R shooting once I get my load developed. On the rifle I currently have a Buffalo River 6-9" bipod. I see most FTR shooters use the aluminum wide stance bipods. Is my bipod a decent choice to start competing with or should I look into a special bipod? If so what are your suggestions on an affordable one to get started or if anyone has one they would part with for a decent price I might be interested? I don't really wanna spend a ton of money on one right away until I know if I like it or not.

    Thanks everyone, Allen.
     
  2. CNCKID

    CNCKID New Member

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    i dont know much about the competing world, but i ask a few basic Q's here.

    1) is the bi-pod legal per the competition rules?
    2) can you hit a target out at 800-1000yds with the bi-pod (if this is your goal)

    if both of these are ok, then perhaps the bi-pod you have chosen is a good choice?
     

  3. kansas45

    kansas45 Member

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    Use the one you have. Does it have the ability to level? Invest in a bubble level that fits the rail or scope. Be darned sure that your scope is level to the rifle, use the bipod and level, check before each shot and go get some X's.
     
  4. Allenvdb

    Allenvdb New Member

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    CNCKID, for F-T/R a front bipod or a bag is actually a requirement. You are not allowed to use the adjustable tripods like the F-open guys do. Thank you Kansas, my scope is level to the rifle, I used a leveling kit when I mounted it. A bubble level that actually attaches to the rifle is my next purchase. Thank you for the advice.
     
  5. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Using a good bag would be more helpful than the cheap bi-pod that you have. The wide stance bi-pods like the Sinclair unit are well worth the money.
     
    Dallas53 likes this.
  6. kansas45

    kansas45 Member

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    I beleive F-T/R rules require a front rest or bipod and a rear bag.
     
  7. Allenvdb

    Allenvdb New Member

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    Correct Kansas45. The NRA rule book for F-TR states you must shoot off of a bipod that is rigidly attached to the forend or use a sling.
     
  8. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Your Buffalo River bipod is a chiwanese knock off of a Harris S series. The Harris is an adequate unit, and twenty years ago was the unit. If your Buffalo River is a good knock off it will be adequate to get you started. If it is a cheap knock off it will lead to hours of frustration.

    Before you buy anymore stuff do the research, and find out what you need, and avoid the knock off stuff unless you can do a direct comparison against the high quality original. The patents on most of the Harris stuff have expired, and the knock offs are flooding in from Chiwan. Some are equal to the original, some don't make decent paper weights.

    Buffalo River is owned by Legacy Sports International, who manufactures several lines, including Howa, so they may be making high quality bipod. I've never touched one, so I can't say.
     
    Dallas53 likes this.
  9. Allenvdb

    Allenvdb New Member

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    Jigs, at the time I bought the bipod I knew it was modeled after a Harris bipod but was half the price. So far I am really pleased with the quality and it is much better than chinese bipod I have on my AR. Thank you for the heads up though.
     
  10. Alamo308

    Alamo308 New Member

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    F-T/R Bipod - Brownells

    My F-T/R .308 wears a Brownells, and it works great. It is moderately adjustable, as you can slide each leg's attachment point up and down independently, plus with the optional (extra) angle lock, you can tilt and lock-in the rifle attachment point to compensate for uneven surface. Not immediate, real-time adjustments like the F-Class Open front rests, but still helpful when needed. Bubble level on the scope gets my vote, too.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2017
  11. Parnelli

    Parnelli Member

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    Those are great for the price-
     
  12. TenGun

    TenGun New Member

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    The first thing to do with an import style Harris S 6-9" Bipod is get rid of the stud attachment hardware and the rubber channel pads with the glue that never dried and fabricate and adhere your own pads.
    These particular bipods usually come with a nice rail mounting attachment block that has a removable sling stud. Replace the block sling stud with an appropriate style and length 1/4"-20 screw. Using a flared bottom nut with a 5/16" threaded bore grind off the points on the nut until the nut fits the squared opening in the bipod. And surface the nut thickness until it sits slightly below the surface of the squared opening.
    Position the bipod on the 1/4"-20 stud in the rail mounting block, slide the flared bottom nut over the stud and into the bipod squared opening and use a 1/4"-20 nut to tighten the assembly firmly.
    There is a threaded sling stud located on the bipod that should also be replaced. And an appropriate size star washer can be added behind the tensioning mechanism knob so that adjustments stay put.
    The mucho improved bipod can also be attached directly to most anything that can be equipped with a 1/4"-20 stud.

    Every firearm part requires close inspection and some require tweaking and some require returning to the seller. Otherwise it's like ordering a forged crankshaft from Crankshaft Perfecto Genius and assuming it's good to go without using a micrometer, etc. to check it over yourself.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017