Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice

Discussion in 'Legal and Activism' started by G66enigma, May 26, 2020.

  1. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member

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    NOTE: Please refrain from outright discussion of politics; this isn't the sub-forum for it. This topic is posted as a simple statement of upholding liberty, something sadly lacking in nearly everyone we hire these days.


    Given the threats to basic liberties we in the United States have, most particularly the cherished right to be armed, I recall many of the statements made in a speech nearly 60 years ago.

    As much for the protection of the RKBA as well as all other basic liberties we, as a free people, demand and expect each day.

    Offered up to illustrate how far we've slid down the path warned of in this speech. If we're not careful, we're going to get just the sort of community we "deserve" ... if we allow it.

    There is good reason why the tyrannical fear an educated, heavily-armed, determined People.


    Quoted in part:

    Spoken by Barry Goldwater, at the '64 RNC.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2020
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  2. woodlander

    woodlander Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Good speech. I was too young to vote for Barry Goldwater, but I definitely would have if I could.
     
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  3. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member

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    I was far too young, at that point, but I'm with you.


    Thought it was a fairly staunch statement of a free People and why we've fought so hard over the years. Don't get many of the hired staff speaking like that, these days. Being free has effectively become a "third-rail" topic, and in claiming support or defense of it a person's labeled one of "those" sorts.

    Should be the SOLE topic, really, aside from general operations and general defense.

    Liberty. Remaining free. Having 99% of the folks we hire there for one reason, and one reason only: defense of it and us, in perpetuity. Like they've sworn to do. What a concept.

    Time for it again, I'd say.
     
  4. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    i voted for Barry Goldwater in 1964. Was stationed at Fort MacArthur, CA at the time. The post chaplain, a LTC, had a sticker on his car that read: "Light Bulb Johnson, turn him out in 64."

    Barry Goldwater was vilified by the opposition as a "hawk", likely to get the US involved in a shooting war. LBJ was elected and the rest is history. The stupid war in Vietnam tore this country apart.
     
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  5. Nmwabbit

    Nmwabbit Well-Known Member

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    and yet the citizens of this country have capitulated their constitutional rights without so much of a skirmish but by the swift mark by an overseer on a document not approved by any congressional/state legislative bodies but in the name of an executive order.

    tis a shame...truly a shame...

    (sorry barry didn't get elected but it wasn't due to a lack of my vote!)
     
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  6. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus Well-Known Member

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    Did Goldwater win that election?
     
  7. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No, it was a really bad defeat for him.
     
  8. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus Well-Known Member

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    Yea, siding with Extremism is, with rare exception, a poor position with the voters.
     
  9. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    He was not an extremist, at all. That was a figure of speech he used to make a point: we concede too much liberty to regulation at home and to communism abroad. It became a favorite turn of phrase for various couch-based blowhards calling for "armed resistance" which Barry Goldwater never promoted and would never approve.

    Yes we got the wily and moderate LBJ instead. We are dealing with his legacy today.
     
  10. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member

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    As others have said, he wasn't hardly "extremist" but was fairly straightforward in acknowledgment of the key role and sworn duty such people have. Protection of Liberty, pure and simple.

    That's not a "sex & sizzle" position to take, though.

    Of course, people were learning to vote themselves largess from the coffers, by that point. "Pork Barrel" and all of that. So there was no point in someone who'd uphold the Oath. More's the pity.

    Anyway, the point of the topic for discussion was the clear-eyed thinking about what defense of liberty is all about, what it takes, and why it's so vital. It is who we are (or, rather, who we once were), and it's the major reason why people from most every other country in the world flock to these shores. Liberty.

    Can't think of many, today, who are in a position of influence who'll state things so clearly.

    A different time.

    A bygone era, sadly.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2020
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  11. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus Well-Known Member

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    I love to read AuH20 speeches. He was a great American.
    The "extremism" speech was an outlier.
     
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  12. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus Well-Known Member

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    Amen. The Greatest Generation and everyone else born before 1943 elected a racist jerk that set events in motion to get us where we are today.
    Thanks mom, grandpa.
     
  13. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Looks like not a lot has changed in all these years!

    ellis

    "...During his 1964 presidential campaign, Mr. Goldwater was attacked by Democrats and opponents within his own party as a demagogue and a leader of right-wing extremists and racists who was likely to lead the United States into nuclear war, eliminate civil rights progress and destroy such social welfare programs as Social Security...."
     
  14. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    I read his book, The Conscience of a Conservative. He believed in state rights and opposed the civil rights legislation on principle, not because he was racist. By him if you don’t want to make a wedding cake for a certain couple, nobody can make you. If someone doesn’t like my religion or hair or whatever I’ll gladly go elsewhere rather than force them to serve me. Or maybe I’ll put them out of business as a competitor, that’s freedom according to BG.
     
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  15. formerCav

    formerCav Well-Known Member

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    if I remember correctly (I was a senior in High School in 1964 and JUST received my draft notice in Nov 64) Barry Goldwater said something like (referring to Vietnam) "I will bomb them back into the stone age"

    am I right or wrong ?? (that reminds me of the "cadence count" in the Army when marching in formation).

    I was too young to vote then (I was 18).
     
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  16. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    Curtis LeMay. I think.
     
  17. formerCav

    formerCav Well-Known Member

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  18. Ghost1958

    Ghost1958 Well-Known Member

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    Pretty sure the founders were called extremist by the British.

    Whenever the holders of power are challenged the challengers are always called extremist.
     
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  19. RKtullahoma

    RKtullahoma Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have the text of a pro-Goldwater speech and a mp4 file of its speaker.

    A soul of that marvelous type and size would not survive in these troubled times very well, and that is exactly not his fault.
     
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  20. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member

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    ^ That last part (whose fault it all is) reminds me of the comments by Edward R. Murrow in his well-known "wires and lights in a box" speech, spoken in 1958 before a crowd at the Radio-Television News Directors Assn convention. He said much the same thing, for all the same reasons.

    An excerpt from Murrow's statements:

    And from another, earlier, editorial Murrow spoke, back in 1954, on an altogether different topic ... but bearing on the same point, the question of who's to blame when we allow such things to pass:

    Yup.
     
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