Experiments in home orcharding

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by buckhuntr, May 8, 2018.

  1. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I have a small home orchard starting to bear a few apples, and have committed to going pesticide free. So, how to get apples sans worms and without spraying? Bagging!
    Did some research on the technique, and have bagged around 60-70 apples on 7 trees, doing some thinning at the same time. To bag, take a cheap zipper closure sandwich bag, cut corners for drainage, clip the seal part in the middle, open bag and cinch closed around the new apple (fruit should be about 1/4" in size) so the stem is through the center slit in the zipper.

    I've had a couple of bags on two weeks, and they've withstood last week's high winds. I'll post periodic progress pics. 20180505_162051.jpg 20180505_162009.jpg 20180505_162034.jpg
     
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  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    I see you are practicing safe sacks......:rolleyes:
     
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  3. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Appears so...
     
  4. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    buckhunter, great tip! We have three apple trees that were on the farm when we moved here 13+ years ago. Unfortunately, there are also plenty of cedars on the property and nearby. The proximity of cedars and apple trees produces something called "apple rust" and "cedar rust". On the cedars, it looks like orange Christmas ornaments; on the apple trees, the apples wind up with a rust-colored surface. Neither plant will develop this without the other plant nearby. It isn't bad for the apple fruit or the consumer, but just doesn't look appealing and would never get sold at market.

    One of the three trees no longer regularly produces fruit, but the remaining two produce more than we, the deer, the racoons, possums, rabbits, crows, squirrels, and all manner of other wildlife can possibly consume. My wife makes 100% pure applesauce and freezes it. We still have some from last year. The rest, we leave to the worms and critters. We like them critters near the house - unless they're yellow jackets....

    Not sure if your bagging tip would serve to protect the apples from apple-rust; may be worth an experiment!
     
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  5. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Most of the apple varieties I have were chosen for disease resistance and suitability for this region. All are heirloom varieties, only one of which (Arkansas Black) I've ever seen fruit for sale anywhere. I'm hoping the bags will prevent bugs from damaging the fruit, doubt they will do much to prevent cedar-apple rust.
     
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  6. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    Buck, should you have cedars nearby and your "bagging" works, that could be a very huge development for those interested in selling apples at COOPs/farmers' markets. You could make a fortune with a patent!

    Think about it!
     
  7. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    If only! It wasn't my idea, unfortunately, all I did was research the concept, and read up on folks who have successfully used bagging on apples and other fruits. Btw, nylon footies (stockings) are more effective on peaches and plums, while bags work better on apples and pears, according to multiple sources.
     
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  8. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Apples already packaged! I like it!
     
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  9. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That is just not right....congrats
     
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  10. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    Okay, Buck. So you won't get rich from a patent. But THANKS for your tip from a bunch of us. Hadn't seen that idea before.
     
  11. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The young apples are growing.
    IMG-20180509-WA0008.jpeg IMG-20180509-WA0004.jpeg
     
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  12. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    That's pretty cool! How about the moisture in the bags? Do you think it will hasten rot?
     
  13. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Not according to the articles I've read. Any excess moisture should drain out the clipped-off corners.
     
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  14. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    You know what you’re doing but I think the bag would act like a mini greenhouse even with corners clipped making it hot and steamy in the bags. But I DO hope you have great success.
     
  15. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    If it works, I'll have worm-free apples with minimal cost, a couple hours labor, and no pesticides.
     
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