Emergency , HELP !

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by dango, Feb 26, 2016.

  1. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    A neighbor bought himself a new plinker a few days ago , a Ruger 22/45 . After a few hundred rounds , he field stripped it to give it a good cleaning . I got to admit , they are a little tricky if you've never assembled one before .

    Well , we took it apart and showed him from the git , two things you must do or it just won't work !
    Stuck the poly frame on upper , showed him trigger hammer , push it down , spring up , push bolt back in , point muzzle upwards and tap to align main spring and trigger hammer and poof !

    I have seen people do this a dozen times at least ! It will go back together but you can't rack it or pull trigger ! After you do it a few times , it gets easier !

    Nice little shooter though ! :D
     
  2. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus New Member

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    I assemble mine upside down.
     

  3. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The first time or two can be tough though ! I remember the first time I did mine , I had to U-Tube it .....! :confused:
     
  4. Mongo

    Mongo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    i agree upside down as in grip up toward the sky when putting the last piece in
     
  5. indy36

    indy36 New Member

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    I have to follow along with the manual every time I clean it. Worst gun ever to take apart, great .22 pistol though. Take down and cleaning is greatly improved with the Majestic Arms Speed Strip kit.

    http://www.majesticarms.com/id10.html

    It's a good part. I had Dino (the owner of Majestic) install the speed strip kit, the extended bolt release, mag safety removal, and trigger job on mine. Then I added the Cmore red dot, the screw-on comp, the slide racker (also Majestic) and grips. It's my Steel Challenge gun and it works great.

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    Last edited: Feb 26, 2016
  6. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That's one of the reasons I sold mine!
     
  7. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    the first few times they are difficult. and it does help to hold it upside down to reassemble it. I don't tear mine down every time to clean it. if it wasn't such a great little pistol, i'd get rid of it, just because they are not the easiest pistols to strip down.
     
  8. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Yeah, the Majestic Speed Kit is the way to go.
     
  9. big shrek

    big shrek Well-Known Member

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    Once you've owned a Connecticut, Hi-Standard,
    or a Browning Buckmark, and done a field strip on them,
    one tends to dispose of the Ruger Mark series rather quickly...
    so easy even a caveman can do it, with better precision barrels ;)
     
  10. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I wouldn't sell my Ruger Mark II for anything.
     
  11. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The easiest to disassemble was the early toggle catch High Standard Sport Kings, it took longer to talk about it than simply drop the mag, thumb the toggle and slide off the barrel and slide.
    No tools needed, no special tricky arms assembly Kama Sutra.

    The Colt Cadet needs a allen wrench, but dissembles pretty much like a High Standard.

    A agree with Indy36, of the Ruger rimfire pistol owners I know only one has the Majestic Arms modification, he loves how well it works.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 27, 2016
  12. Mongo

    Mongo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    After you assemble it a few times, it's no big deal unless you are nervous, grouchy or generally uptight in your default attitude
     
  13. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    There is a swiveling rod inside the grip that must be overlaying the transverse bar, before the lockpin is folded shut. That is the reason you point the pistol up, to prevent the rod from "diving" under the bar. When the rod ends up under the bar, the lockpin will still fold flush, but the bolt will be unmovable.

    To correct this, take out the lockpin, note the swivel rod positioned under the bar, and wiggle the free end of it from underneath the bar. A paper clip should do it. Then point the gun muzzle up, watch the rod dangle in the correct position, PULL THE TRIGGER, and fold the lockpin into the grip.
     
  14. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    I disassembled my Mk-II about this time last year to clean and had a heck of a time reassembling, with the same symptoms of not being able to pull the bolt back. Spent about an hour trying to do it, and the Ruger manual really wasn't of much help, unless you already knew how to do it. I fiddled with it a lot and then had much of the innards spring out - springs, pins and all. It was well beyond my capacity (in terms of skill, knowledge, and confidence) to fix. Took it to a local gunsmith: $80 and 30 minutes later it was all back together. I felt like an idiot but he said he gets them in all the time.

    That's when I started lurking on this forum and RFC, and eventually joined. This website gave the best instructions for me and I printed out the page and it is the first thing I open up when cleaning my pistol and follow it step by step each time. http://www.1bad69.com/ruger/field_strip.htm

    I don't shoot my Mk-II much, primarily because of the PITA to reassemble, which is too bad since it is a fine shooter. For general plinking, I shoot my Bersa Thunder .22. It disassembles to the three main groups (slide, receiver with barrel, recoil spring) in less than five seconds, and reassembles in about the same time. And it is fun to shoot, too.

    I'm guessing the 22/45 is similar to the Mk-II and Mk-III series in terms of breaking down and reassembling. Would recommend printing out the referenced web page and keep it with your cleaning supplies/manuals. Following the instructions, it still takes me about ten minutes to get it back together. I suppose if I do it enough times, it will become second nature...
     
  15. slysir

    slysir New Member

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    Same here!! I purchased a MKI back in the late 70's. That was long before there were PC's and youtube. You were on your own trying to figure out why the SOB won't reassemble.

    After much frustration, I finally got the POS back together...it was promptly sold, and I have never considered getting another!!

    John
     
  16. big shrek

    big shrek Well-Known Member

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    At this point I'm just OLD, and ain't got time to waste on inferior designs. ;)
    Ruger ain't never gotten an Olympic Gold Medal in pistols...
    but Hi-Standard of CT has :)
     
  17. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus New Member

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    Back in 85 when I purchased my first H&K91. I had a similar conundrum with reassembly. I was making the mistake of setting the bolt fully down onto the carrier. The cam rollers were fully out and the weapon would not function
    I was breaking out in the sweats it was so frightening to the young Schnuffleupagus. Did I ruin the weapon? Did I prove that I was a functional idiot? (The answers were no and yes) But, after a weekend of slow steady application of the scientific method, I took it to a smith who educated me for 20 bucks.
    Experience is the name we give to our mistakes.
    She became the Belle of the arms room at Benning.
     
  18. harkersislandnc

    harkersislandnc Active Member

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    I am ashamed to admit this but I pay to have my MkII cleaned yearly. $50 is cheaper that the throwing the damn thing across the room.