Eliminating Revolver Cylinder Endshake

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by Sharps40, Jun 15, 2014.

  1. Sharps40

    Sharps40 New Member

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    A very old S&W Mod 36. A Flat Latch. I still have the original numbers matching walnut grips, long ago sanded smooth and varnished for snag free concealment by the original LE owner.

    A fine shooter with most of its original finish....just a touch of endshake in the cylinder. An easy remedy and this handgun will be as tight as new in 15 minutes.

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    The 10 thousands gauge is a very tight interference fit. The 9 thousands gauge just barely slips between cylinder and barrel with the cylinder held fully rearward. There is visible fore and aft shake in the cylinder along the yoke axle with the gauge removed. Too nice a gun to allow it to continute be battered with each shot.

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    Stainless steel shims, 2 thousands thick. They come in packs of 10 and I should only need one. So, since they are long lasting and I only need one....guess I'll have to find several more S&W revolvers to tighten up.....

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    Remove the yoke and cylinder from the frame.

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    Disassemble the extractor mechanism from the cylinder. On the J frame Smith, the threads are reversed....Righty Loosie, Lefty Tighty gets it apart.

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  2. Sharps40

    Sharps40 New Member

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    A single endshake bearing is inserted. It fits in the bottom of the cylinder, under the large spring, surrounding the extractor shaft and bearing against the face of the yoke axle.

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    Install the extractor only into the stripped cylinder. Drop on a single endshake bearing.

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    Press the endshake bearing fully home with the yoke axle.

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    Reassamble the springs and extractor rods to the cylinder and test fit in the revolver. At this time, a 2 thousands shim makes it impossible to insert the 9 thousands gauge. The revolver function appears perfect with no drag and no endshake...so it appears only one shim is needed and no trimming of the axle is needed to allow for insertion of a full 2 thousands thick bearing.

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    A final check, 7 thousands is now a slightly snug fit. I won't add any more shims. Endshake is gone and the gun functions without snagging or hitching. If in 30 years it loosens up again, 2 stacked shims can be added but I doubt I'll ever have to get in there again! That's it. Done, this one is ready to go back to full duty service.

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  3. uanda

    uanda New Member

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    until you have to peen the hand or replace it, a few thousand rds or drysnaps. :)
     
  4. Sharps40

    Sharps40 New Member

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    The hand is fine. Never seen but one so worn it had to be replaced. Not really a high wear component in guns well cared for it seems. Dry firing won't hurt the hand either.
     
  5. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Colt pistols had the hand that needed adjusting/replacement.
     
  6. Sharps40

    Sharps40 New Member

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    Something must be lost in translation because I am not tracking on the concerns for relationship between endshake (in this example) and the posibilitities of peening or replacing the hand or shimming a worn hand slot .... though I do recognize that most all revolvers have hand and ratchet assemblies.....They are four separate and though near by each other, basically unrelated wear points. As such, wear and tear in one (the yoke axle) is not necessarily an indication that wear and tear in another (ratchet, hand, ratchet slot) has exceeded specificiation. One must be fixed (endshake) before ratchet depth, hand length and slot width can be evaluated. For this simplistic thread, the single lane is endshake.

    Perhaps the concern is a simple case of too much ancilary information being brought to bear in a simple/single item (single lane) fix type of thread.

    Yes, all the points can be worn to one degree or another....the subject here is limited to wear and subsequant shimming of the axle...the first step in evaluation and repair.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2014
  7. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    I could be wrong but I read uanda's reply as suggesting that you probably wont have to get into the gun again until other parts start to wear out (like the hand) several thousand rounds down the road from now. I don't think there was any intention of linking that to the repair you just did. Nice job by the way... that's a nice piece you have there.

    Personally, I would want to extend that cylinder stop timing though. But that's just me.
     
  8. Sharps40

    Sharps40 New Member

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    Copy. That makes sense.

    No need to change cylinder stop though. Its snug and does not drag nor bind in/out during rotation.
     
  9. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Those older Smiths were more prone to end shake cylinder. Steel technology in the 40's and 50's was not what it is today. I have installed these bearings (I call them bushings) in many a model 66 over the years. Most were 1980's manufactured and LE duty guns for 20 years. I only used a .004 bushing about 2 times and NEVER had to add a second .002 after the first. As the yoke gets peened shorter, it also gets tougher. Just like flame cutting (on most guns) it is self limiting
     
  10. Sharps40

    Sharps40 New Member

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    Yes its a pretty simple job and usually long lasting. Ya wouldnt believe the mail though...lotsa folks wanting it to be a difficult factory only repair.

    Unfounded Nervous Nelly Worries from the bushing causing the hand to need stoning to needing to retime the bolt.

    I spose there are so many worries on the net that folks cant beleive and as such many will never try. Its a shame...most smithing is pretty elementary. The hard part is understanding.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2014