Ebony Stain

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by Commocarl, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. Commocarl

    Commocarl New Member

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    Hey Guys
    I am having a heck of a time and need some sage advice.

    I have an old Savage .22 rifle I have been playing around with now for months. It was a beater that I purchased cheap and wanted to refurbish myself.

    The stock is beat to hell; scratches, gouges, dings and dents galore. I have been trying to figure out how to stain it ebony to hide most of the problems.

    I have used a furniture ebony stain, it went on like paint, not showing the grain, and mostly came off with sanding. I tried leather dye, almost the same result. I diluted the dye in alcohol and tried again. it was a little better but not very dark at all. So now I have a stock showing every ding, dent and scratch.

    As this is a rough project rifle, I am not opposed to painting it if all else fails. I really would like to have a black stock that shows the grain. My last ditch try at this will be with a black marker. Before I resort to that I wanted to ask your advice.
     
  2. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    Coloring the stock will do little to mask imperfections. Most gouges and dents can be steamed out by using a damp wash cloth and an iron. Place a corner of the damp cloth over the area, and press the hot iron against it. Steam will enter the pores of the wood and raise the dent. It can then be sanded flush. Sand the lighter scratches out and refinish the stock.
     

  3. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I agree the iron can work wonders. As far as the ebony stain goes...do a little at a time. Put a coat on. Let is soak in for a couple minutes. Wipe it off. Repeat. You will do better with a bunch of thin coats than one or two heavy ones. Dont get in a hury.
     
  4. Intheshop

    Intheshop New Member

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  5. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Fire........

    You might try a small propane torch, I find it works wonders to bring out the grain and add dark coloring with out the use of stains. try this on a piece of simialar wood, then have at it. Then you can use a mixture of wood oils to bring out the beauty.......:)
     
  6. Commocarl

    Commocarl New Member

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    Thanks everyone.

    I have ironed the stock, but as I have said, it is in pretty rough shape.
    Thanks for all the ideas.
     
  7. Datalore

    Datalore New Member

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    Remove the entire stock and sand it to bare wood. Then apply the stain you would like. Then apply coats of clear until it gets the shine that you are looking for. I have refinished several stocks that many thought were beyond repair. Saw a great tip on an earlier post. Always go with several thin coats of stain or clear and the end product will be much nicer.
     
  8. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Just me......

    I'm not into a stock and fore end that glints in the sun light. it should melt into the terrain.......What do i know.....:confused:
     
  9. drtybrd97

    drtybrd97 New Member

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    Do you know what is the species of the wood? If it is a harder wood (hard maple, hickory, white oak) they are not as porous so it may be more difficult to get it to accept the stain.
    1) Sand the stock with 120 grit. Then try staining a small section at a time. If you sand with a higher grit it will almost polish the wood and the stain will not be able to dive into the pores.
    2) If you can find someone that sells a low solvent stain base that would work best. The ls base had to be stirred a lot though.
    3) You could also try"conditioning" the wood before you apply the stain. Just apply clear stain base and wipe off before apply the ebony.

    One of those should help I hope.
     
  10. drtybrd97

    drtybrd97 New Member

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    Make sure your have sanded back to bare wood before you try anything
     
  11. Tuner

    Tuner New Member

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    When refinishing a stock the first thing you have to do is to remove 100% of the old finish. This is typically done with some type of stripping agent. Once the old finish is removed you can remove dents by the steaming process described. Whai I do is to soak a piece of cotton cloth and lay several layers over the dent and then apply a hot iron. Steam it for 5-10 seconds and remove and check the dent. This can be done several times. BTW, if you did not get all the finish off the stock dent the water/steam will not penetrate well and this won't work well. Gouges where material has been removed are another matter, here you have basically two choices; sand them out or fill them in. If there is pleanty of material in the stock, ie it is thick enough sanding is in my opinion the better way to go. Two points of caution here. One, when sanding out a scratch you are going to create a "hollow" or low spot in the stock and if left that way will make it loook like a real novice job. If you are sanding out a scratch in the but stock section you sanding needs needs to be carried out from the wrist to the but/recoil pad end. A good stockmaker will lay a straight edge on the stock to make sure there are no high or low spots. Second point on sanding out a scratch or gouge is that a good stock has some semetry to it. This is most obvious on the forend section of the stock. The thickness of wood on each side of the barrel channel should be equal and if it is necessary to thin the one side of the stock to remove a gouge or scratch, then reduce the other side the same. Again, don't sand any low spots in the stock, use your straight edge.

    The other way to repair a gouge is to fill it in and a good filler can be made by saving the sanding dust from where you sand the stock, mixing a thick paste with Elmer's glue and applying to the gouge. Let it thoroughly dry and then carefully sand it to blend in with the area. The problem with filling in a scratch is that area will typically not take stain well.

    Before applying any stain, finish sanding the stock and I typically go to a 400 grit paper. The take a wet spong, wet the stock and quickly dry it. I do this by moving the stock rapidly over a hot burner of my kitchen stove. This will raise the "fuzz" on the stock and again lightly sand the stock with 400 or finer paper to remove the Fuzz.

    You are now ready to apply your stain which should be applied in several applications according to the directions. You are now ready to apply your finish!

    Personally, this effort is probably not justified on an older Savage .22 and what I would probably do is strip it, steam the dents, fill the gouges, sand and then apply several coats of a flat balck spray paint hitting it with some 0000 steel wool inbetween coats. The stock woood more then likely does not have a significant grain and the value of the gun would not justify the efffore unless you want to use it as a learning process.

    Good luck with whatever you decide on.
     
  12. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    1.-First remove the stock completely from the rifle, and remove all

    metal parts from the stock not to be treated.

    2.-I did my stripping and sanding with a rag and a wet slurry of

    baking soda. It's a time-consuming process. Let the BS dry,

    and remove it with a wet rag. Lather, rinse, repeat, as much

    as is necessary.

    3.- Many small imperfections

    will disappear with this process. IME, (one stock) all stamped

    cartouches will remain, if you don't make it a point to grind on

    them, like a knothead.

    4.- CAREFULLY rinse the wood with water,

    and allow to dry repeatedly, until you are certain there is

    no old stain, or baking soda left.

    5.-Use toothpicks and

    Q-tips to get to the tight spots, throughout the process.

    Be certain the wood is thoroughly dry, before staining.

    6.-Then I used Ebony MinWax (the small can is plenty) straight from

    the local home improvement store. The result, after three coats,

    (wipe on, count to 30, wipe off) is a beautiful deep charcoal grey,

    which shows a little wood color, and

    beautifully accentuates the deeper black grain.

    7.-No liability for ruined equipment or stocks will be undertaken by this poster.

    This is merely a cost-effective technique I effectively used, and results

    of individuals who are inexperienced, impatient ,ham-handed, overzealous, or simply

    not lucky, or paying attention ARE NOT GUARANTEED. BTW, this process, in it's

    entirety, took almost three weeks.

    Try this on a piece of test wood or an old, expendable stock first...
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012
  13. St8LineGunsmith

    St8LineGunsmith New Member

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    maple maybe, hickory or oak very doubtful they dont make gun stocks out of either.
    oak has an acidic natural oil that can cause rust and corrosion on metal parts
    and hickory cracks too easy to make rifle stocks out of.
    the most common stock wood is maple, cherry and walnut.
    there are other more exotic woods that are used on high end rifles but I highly doubt you will find very many high end rifles that wre beaters.
     
  14. drtybrd97

    drtybrd97 New Member

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    Just stating the characteristics of hard wood versus soft wood when staining. Most are maple, walnut, cherry or mahogany I think.
     
  15. drtybrd97

    drtybrd97 New Member

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    Sanding over 120 before staining is not necessary. It polishes the wood and the stain cannot penetrate as well. That maybe why you have to apply your stain several times. Sand to 120 and then apply stain maybe twice. As long as you stain after sanding (and removing the dust) the grain will not have time to raise or "fuzz". I'm no expert but I am in the woodworking industry and know what our finish specialists say to do.
     
  16. St8LineGunsmith

    St8LineGunsmith New Member

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    for a slick stock you finish by wet sanding with 800 grit wet sanding paper and boiled linseed oil or tung oil.
    I build rifles and this is my method of finishing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012