Dry Firing

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by rferguson61, Sep 17, 2012.

  1. rferguson61

    rferguson61 New Member

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    So I read recently that one of the best tips pro shooters can give is to dry fire your rifle to get the muscle memory do you aren't jerking or twitching and you get a consistent trigger pull. I want to start doing this so that I have the perfect trigger pull for hunting season. They suggested using snap caps to protect your firing pin (the debate of wether snap caps are needed or not is a different subject entirely) My question is can I just stick a used brass in the chamber so that the firing pin has something to hit against and absorb some energy (like a snap cap does) or would that not work/cause problems?
     
  2. bearrwe

    bearrwe New Member

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    As a gunsmith I quite often use used brass when dry firing a gun that I don't have a snap cap on hand for. You just need to change it out after a few shots as the snap caps are spring loaded for repetitive use.
     

  3. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    No need for centerfire firearms, dry firing causes less wear than actually shooting. The firing pin doesn't touch anything.
     
  4. rferguson61

    rferguson61 New Member

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    Thanks! I should have enough spent cases to last until I can get snap caps.
     
  5. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    It doesn't hurt to dry fire most modern centerfire rifles. I would not dry fire rimfire rifles. Consult your owners manual to makes sure. Ruger states in their owners manual you should dry fire their rifles to become accustomed to the rifle or SA revolver.
     
  6. rferguson61

    rferguson61 New Member

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    True, but first, my rifle is quite old and I bight it used, so there's no owners manual. Also, sure you could probably dry fire a rifle thousands of times with no problem, but that four thousand and first time...your firing pin comes flying out the barrel (happened to a friends gun while I was sitting there) I don't see why not use a tool that was designed to prevent the extra wear of dry firing. Id rather have something, anything, in the chamber to help disperse energy from the pin.
     
  7. Ranger-6

    Ranger-6 New Member

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    Buy a BB gun and practice with that, worked for me.
     
  8. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    Your friends rifle was likely in the same shape as a Mossberg shotgun I used to shoot skeet with. The firing pin block had severe wear. I brought the shotgun into a gunsmith and asked how much to repair it? He grabbed a new Mossberg off the shelf and laid it on the counter.
     
  9. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    The folks who say dry firing causes no damage (in a centerfire) are correct -- if you only do it a couple of times. Probably. The peoploe who say to do it often as practice were taught by non-com military instructors who never learned physics and are using their uncle's property as they were taught by THEIR non-coms.

    All that energy has to go somewhere. Dry-firing is shocking the hammer, firing pin, and other parts as well as compressing the firing pin spring as much as possible and then some. Don't do it. A snap cap with counter-acting spring absorbs some pressure and turns it into heat.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2012
  10. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And target competitors will dry fire without snap caps a hundred times or more for every round of live fire.

    It absolutely will not harm modern centerfire weapons. Ask the manufacturers or military/LE instructors who know far more about the subject than "internet experts."
     
  11. greydog

    greydog Member

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    I'm a gunsmith with 35+ years of experience and have been target shooting for longer than that. I dry fire quite a bit and prefer to use a snap cap. I turned out some nylon "primers" which I seat into a case to cushion the pin. GD
     
  12. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    I'm one of those internet experts, and a High Power Service Rifle competitor. Lots o' non-coms who know everything, and not much right. Point in case like troll above who has neither been there NOR done that...

    Some say they sit there for hours, in position, dry firing without snap caps or a cartridge in place, with their competition gun. Those are the losers and the liars. Intuitively, at least, the common-sense shooters eventually come to realize what they're doing to their guns.

    And remember -- the .223 will never be a competitive Service Rifle round. Stupid, useless, mouse-guns. Da good ol' sarn' dun tol' me dat too...

    LOL
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012
  13. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    Great information here. Let's not make differences of opinion degrade into personal slanders.
     
  14. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have run some cases through my sizer/decapper die and they definitely fit. Fill the primer pocket with silicone or goo. You will have to replace the silicone every so often. Make a bunch with fmj bullets and they will feed through your mag. The nylon is nice but not many of us can turn it to fit. Mark them so you dont mix them up.
     
  15. drvsafe

    drvsafe New Member

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    I was aware of some makers of bb guns that make replicas of actual firearms, theres a great replica of my P229 out there, but is the trigger pull exactly as the real steel? I don't think so. The best thing is to go by the manufacturers' recommendation regarding dry firing. If the manufacturer says you don't need them but you want to use snap caps go for it! But one way or the other it is in the gun owners best interests to be as familiar with their weapon as they can and dry firing is one method to be familiar with trigger pull, stages, any take up there is, etc.
     
  16. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    When you dry fire, you are launching that firing pin into thin air, where there is no resistance and no place to transfer the energy. Ever swing full force in a fight and miss? How did your shoulder and elbow feel? That force, energy, stress has to go somewhere. Just because you have dry fired a gun hundreds or thousands of times and not had a critical failure does NOT mean you're not causing damage to the parts.

    Besides, if you wish to cure bad habits with trigger pull, you need to be surprised by what the gun does when you pull the trigger. This can only be done by someone else loading the magazine with both live rounds and snap caps or reloads with no powder and the primer filled with silicone or the like. You touch off some live rounds and then a snap cap gets fed....*click*...you immediately evaluate if you jerked, close your eyes, or whatever the problem may be. A spotter is good for this as well as loading "trick" magazines. Anything less and you "know" it's an airgun or snap cap or whatever and don't respond the same way as a live round, although these are great for new shooters or those new to a new platform to practice with.

    It's your weapon and as long as you don't mind wear and tear leading to a possible gunsmith visit, don't worry about it. But the laws of physics can't be ignored just because it happens in a gun chamber. :)
     
  17. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    So I suppose all of the instructors at the miliary basic training facilities, all of the police academies, and even the FBI academy really don'r know diddly about guns. And to think, even the manufacturers don't know anything about the guns they make!

    That's too bad. I really thought I had learned some good information from those folks.:(
     
  18. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    What? :confused:

    The firing pin on most boltguns has a shoulder that slams into the back of the bolt face if there isn't a primer to help negate forward movement.

    Hence the reason the Snap-Cap has made such and easy move into the market.

    OP - I would recommend investing in a Snap Cap and if you can't do that, rotate used brass through as you practice.

    JD
     
  19. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    But, "they" said the firing pin doesn't touch anything!

    Bang a hammer on an anvil hard and/or often enough and they'll break and go dead too. Internet experts abound. As for what instructors tell people, having been one in uniform for a decade, including instructing uniformed instructors, I can tell you that they are inconsistant and usually not the sharpest bayonet in the armory.

    I had one national team shooter arguing with me about a new Turner sling. I was explaining the issue was it was just too spongy even though it'd been weight-stretched and dried. He was furious and though I was showing him to his face that the thing was elastic like a rubber-band he refused to acknowledge it, pretending it wasn't changing length by inches under tension. Typical -- someone told him Turner's were the best and therefore it could not be a problem. It would have been funnier if he weren't allowed to touch firearms and his X's didn't count...
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012
  20. bigjim

    bigjim New Member

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    I can honestly say, I do not know if it causes harm or not. I do use a snap cap for dry firing in all my guns. If you do not have one, then take a used case, pop the used primer out and put a eraser from a pencil into the primer pocket and trim the eraser to the case. This will allow you to use this as a tempory snap cap till you can get one, or just use your home made one.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012