Dry Fire

Discussion in 'SIG Sauer Forum' started by jeffkaiser1989, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. jeffkaiser1989

    jeffkaiser1989 New Member

    329
    0
    0
    There seems to be alot of different opinions on dry firing of any gun. But i have a sig p238 and i was wondering if dry firing will hurt the gun. Please post a reply if you have an answer thanks!
     
  2. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

    12,824
    136
    63
    There are some experts on this forum. I am not one. If you fear damage could result from dry firing your firearm, invest in snap caps.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2013

  3. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

    4,823
    0
    0
    Most modern handguns I wouldn't think have a real problem with dry fire. My rebuttal to that is are snap caps that expensive? Pretty cheap insurance policy ya ask me.

    I'd look in the manual. They usually will have info about dry fire in them.
     
  4. jeffkaiser1989

    jeffkaiser1989 New Member

    329
    0
    0
    thanks for the advice and i did some research online and found my answer.
     
  5. blackxpress

    blackxpress New Member

    156
    0
    0
    And the answer is?
     
  6. jeffkaiser1989

    jeffkaiser1989 New Member

    329
    0
    0
  7. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

    29,445
    314
    83
    I have a Sig P238. I called Sig Sauer and asked about dry firing this pistol. They said it was okay to do. I didn't see anything in the manual. Also, when I was looking at the gun at the guns shop, I asked if I could dry fire it and they said it was okay to do.
     
  8. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    1
    0
    Shotguns & Kel Tec's are the only modern firearms I know of that can be damaged by dry firing. I have no idea why a Kel Tec can't be dry fired. The shoulder of the firing pin in a shotgun slams against the block/receiver when you dry fire a shotgun. It won't hurt to dry fire a shotgun in function tests. You just don't want to dry fire a shotgun a lot.
     
  9. bluesman69

    bluesman69 New Member

    1
    0
    0
    I was told to never dry fire a .22. Has that changed?
     
  10. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    I have also heard that no rimfire should be dry fired
     
  11. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

    4,910
    2
    38
    Yes & no. For the vast majority of .22s that is true.
    However, if anyone has figured out how to disassemble a Ruger MK3 (see manual, disassembly, step 1.) without dry firing, I'd be happy to hear about it. But then, the design of the bolt/firing pin assembly takes this into account. Even then, this is only for disassembly/ reassembly. Extensive dry fire practice is another matter entirely. The design doesn't look so robust to where I'd try it.
    If your (rimfire) gun's owners manual doesn't say specifically that you can dry fire, don't.
     
  12. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

    1,638
    0
    0
    I have dry fired guns -- rifles and pistols -- for decades with no harm to any gun. Now, I don't do it excessively, like dry fire practice - but I don't believe the occasional "snap" will harm most guns.
     
  13. string1946

    string1946 New Member

    1,944
    0
    0
    As far as dry firing not necessarly 22lr but any rimfire, if you have to take the gun apart fine. I would probably put a fired case in the chamber and use that as a snap cap. But you shouldn't dry fire a rimfire if you can help it. The firing pin is position to strike the rim of the case and if there is no case there it can strike the edge of the chamber and can cause it to deform from the firing pin strikes. Most any modern centerfires it should be just fine to dry fire. Competition shooters dry fire their guns hundreds of thousand times. I'm sure there are other opinions but thats mine.
     
  14. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

    4,910
    2
    38
    For the sake of greater clarity:
    FWIW, the design in the Ruger Mk3 halts the forward progress of the firing pin so that it will not (in theory) strike the chamber face...assuming everything is in good working order.
    It bugs the hell out of me, but it's in the book.
     
  15. string1946

    string1946 New Member

    1,944
    0
    0
    You actually read the instruction manual? Dang!!! I might ought to try that.:D