Dry fire

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Josh1158, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

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    Is it bad to dry fire your gun? I've heard some say yes and some say no.
     
  2. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I go back and forth on this, too. I think it depends on the gun. I've been told dry firing a rimfire is bad but then I've been told it's perfectly okay to dry fire my Mark II. I don't think I know enough about the insides of a gun to reason this out. I'm eagerly awaiting posts on this thread from some knowledgeable people.

    Here's my thread I started a while ago....

    http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f14/dry-fire-not-question-49232/
     

  3. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If the hammer directly hits the firing pin, the usual consensus is no.

    If it uses a transfer bar to engage the firing pin, generaly the answer is yes.

    Check your owner's manual, or buy snap caps if you are worried about dry firing your gun.

    hope this helps.

    WOC. I'm not familiar with that pistol. The manuals for my mini 14, 10/22, and GP100 all say yes, check the one for your mark II. If you can't find it, it is available at Ruger's website.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2012
  4. paintsplat

    paintsplat New Member

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    even if it says yes you would be safer putting snap caps in, then at least you would know it's not live ammo
     
  5. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I have a PG100 that I do have snap caps for. But I don't understand how snap caps work in a semi-auto. Do you fill the magazine with the snap caps and then they fly out and you fill the magazine again?

    I do believe my Mark II has a transfer bar that engages the firing pin. But I don't really understand those mechanics you listed. I am going to have to see the actions of each of those methods you described. Anyone have a good link that will show me the difference?

    Forgive my basic and uneducated questions. I've still got a lot to learn.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2012
  6. Belltactical

    Belltactical New Member

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    Well, the snap cap was designed to allow for dry fire so the firing pin would hit something other that the inside of the firing pin chamber. In a semi-auto, you'll benefit from 2 things. First, the firing pin will hit the cap so no potential damage to the pin or the hole through which it passes and second, a basic extractor/ejector function test. You'll have to cycle e weapon manually of course, but it will "prove" the entire loading and extraction/ejection system is working correctly. Having said that, I've seen snap caps work just fine when the slide or charging handle or bolt is retracted to pull the round and then find a problem with live ammo when things are boing bang and moving really fast in the weapon. Hope this helps.
     
  7. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    You don't have to eject the cap in an auto every time. The pin will reset if you pull the slide back .5 inch or so, and you're ready to "snap" again. Just be sure after you reset the pin, the slide goes back into battery.

    Or, as stated previously, load the mag and practice clearing failures.
     
  8. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

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    I dont have a owners manual for any of my guns. I think I got ya though. My 357 has a plate that slides up between the hammer and the pin when its cocked. So it would be ok? What about rifles like my 870?

    What's a snap cap?
     
  9. TimKS

    TimKS Member Lifetime Supporter

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    ...it's dummy round of ammo....usually made of plastic or similar material.
     
  10. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

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    Ohh I didn't know thoes were snap caps. I always thought were dummy rounds.
     
  11. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A tranfere bar is a flat metal bar that is attached to the trigger assembly that rises up to the strike surface of the firing pin when you pull and hold back on the trigger. When the hammer falls, as the trigger breaks, the hammer strikes this bar. It in turn strikes the firing pin, which fires the cartridge. When decocking a revoler for instance, after the break point ( trigger releases the hammer)you are instructed to take you finger off the trigger. This allows the transfer bar to fall away from the firing pin. Without the transfer bar, the hammer will hit the frame of the revolver, not the firing pin. It is a saftey device (not to be entirely relied on! Keep the gun pointed in a safe direction during the whole process.) that allows the shooter to carry the weapon at full capacity, (6 rounds) without as much risk of an AD should it be dropped.

    Don't worry about the questions Winds. We are all here to learn, and to help when we can. I learned 2 things from this thread already. How a snap cap works, and an easier way to use them in a semi-auto. Thanks for posting those replies guys!:)
     
  12. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You got it right Josh, that's the transfer bar. Contact the companys that manufactuer the guns, and request a manual. If you ask, they will send you one. Most companys have them available for down load at their website. check there first.

    http://gjkm.com This is the wesite for JEM enterprises. One of the products they offer is Do Everything Manuals for many different types of firearms. If the manufacturer is no longer in business, or you are looking to get more detailed information on take down and reassembly, as well as some general information on the guns you have, Check them out. they may have what you are looking for. Good luck.

    Oh yeah, I would buy the snap caps just to be on the safe side, JMO.
     
  13. tCan

    tCan Active Member

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    Winds of Change was actually a little ambiguous about which Mk II he has. The Savage Mk II is a .22LR bolt action rifle and the Ruger MkII is a .22LR pistol. Since he didn't correct us, I'm assuming he has the Ruger.

    What kfox describes is advertised and pictured here: http://www.digitaleditiononline.com/publication/?i=56797 on page 4-5. It's generally a safety feature.

    Reference your manual for instruction on whether or not dry fire is safe. Most rimfire guns are not safe to dry fire as the firing pin will usually strike the hard steel of the chamber instead of the much softer brass casing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2012
  14. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Sorry. Yes, it is a Ruger Mark II pistol.