Firearms Talk banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bent my decapping pin on some crimped 5.56. Bought a set of those thicker and hardened decapping pins that are supposed to be much better. First crimped 5.56, bent it like a cheese curl.

Done with this crap. Tossed all the crimped stuff into the scrap bin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Check to see if it was berdan primed. Most crimped primers come out, they are a little stiffer to push out but not hard enough to bend or break a decapping pin.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Definitely not berdan. I managed to decap some of it with my old decapping pin before it gave up. It's "Igman" brand stuff that my son bought a couple of boxes of from Rural King. It's crimped and sealed (assuming lacquer).

Just not worth the effort and decapping pins for 25-ish cases. Once fired 223/5.56 that's been decapped, cleaned and trimmed is cheap. Son bought 1000 once fired cases a few weeks ago. Was supposed to be all Hornady, but they sent 500 Lake City and 500 Hornady, all decapped, tumbled and trimmed for $99.

I'm converting 250 of the Hornady to 300 Blackout (got 100 done so far). Figured if I could decap the Igman, I'd just make 300 out of it, but meh.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,255 Posts
Definitely not berdan. I managed to decap some of it with my old decapping pin before it gave up. It's "Igman" brand stuff that my son bought a couple of boxes of from Rural King. It's crimped and sealed (assuming lacquer).

Just not worth the effort and decapping pins for 25-ish cases. Once fired 223/5.56 that's been decapped, cleaned and trimmed is cheap. Son bought 1000 once fired cases a few weeks ago. Was supposed to be all Hornady, but they sent 500 Lake City and 500 Hornady, all decapped, tumbled and trimmed for $99.

I'm converting 250 of the Hornady to 300 Blackout (got 100 done so far). Figured if I could decap the Igman, I'd just make 300 out of it, but meh.
Doesn't sound too awful bad for that much brass. It can come from much more expensive places.....like new ammo.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,382 Posts
That sucks... never run into that brand. I seem to remember IMI being pretty stiff, but have only bent/broke pins on berdan primers. I wonder if that brand has a smaller flash hole???
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Possibly. The few I managed to decap got tossed in the bucket with the rest. Not going to dig it out to check, lol.

Then again, it's also possible there are berdan mixed into the lot as well. I wouldn't be surprised.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, curiosity got the better of me, so I went down and dug them out. Looking down in the case with a light, not berdan, but the flash hole is very tiny, much smaller than any of the other 223 or 5.56 I have. So, that has to be it. Scrap it is, not gonna mess with it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,963 Posts
Wondering whether the pin on your decapping die is small enough. Perhaps it just balled up on the inner surface of the opening of the primer hole, if too large.

The only brass I've got is Lapua for 6.5 Creedmoor, but it's their newer small rifle primer pocket brass, with the 0.057" (puny) flash holes. Requires a much-thinner pin to get through that hole. Have a new decapper die from Mighty Armory (their #PUA) model, with the 0.057" pins. Haven't yet de-primed any of the brass. Hopefully it'll do these cases without issue, when I get to them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wondering whether the pin on your decapping die is small enough. Perhaps it just balled up on the inner surface of the opening of the primer hole, if too large.

The only brass I've got is Lapua for 6.5 Creedmoor, but it's their newer small rifle primer pocket brass, with the 0.057" (puny) flash holes. Requires a much-thinner pin to get through that hole. Have a new decapper die from Mighty Armory (their #PUA) model, with the 0.057" pins. Haven't yet de-primed any of the brass. Hopefully it'll do these cases without issue, when I get to them.
No, not for these cases it definitely isn't. Everything else it's fine. Not going to invest in another decapper and smaller pins just for a handful of cases. If I end up down the road with a bunch of 5.56 with tiny holes, I'll think about it then. One of my son's buddy's doesn't reload and he said he has a few thousand 5.56 we can have, so we'll see.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
13,109 Posts
Hydro
IMO just for 25 cases it would not be worth the hassle or the cost to do it correctly.

However, if your Sons buddy has several thousand 5.56 NATO Cases you can "have" or get reasonably. With the price of Brass it might be worth an investment in some tools to reload it; The below is some examples of some tools.

1. Lyman Universal Decapper Die for 5.56 (For cases with small Primer Pocket Holes
2. Case Cleaner (Vibrator or Tumbler)
3. Dillon Super Swage Decapper 600 (There are other types! for less! But it is the Cadillac)
4, Hand Crank Case Timmer with Various Guides(Trimming 5.56 Cases to OAL of 1.750)
5. Calipers For measuring OAL
6. Hand Chamfering Tool (For Removing Burs after trimming Inside and Out of Case.)
7. It has been recommended using CCI #41 Primers (Their Material is slightly harder than most Primers/ To Mil Spec. standards.)
IMO that could be the reason that some who load 5.56 NATO Cases after they have been fired the Crimp Swaged and Reloaded have had Primers pop out on occasions.
You may already have some of the above since obviously you do reload! So just the items for the 5.56 NATO reloading would be a consideration at this point.
But as stated if you can get thousands of Brass Cases and the fact it would open the door to be able to locate more and load them correctly, it might be well worth it?

03
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,382 Posts
Hydro
IMO just for 25 cases it would not be worth the hassle or the cost to do it correctly.

However, if your Sons buddy has several thousand 5.56 NATO Cases you can "have" or get reasonably. With the price of Brass it might be worth an investment in some tools to reload it; The below is some examples of some tools.

1. Lyman Universal Decapper Die for 5.56 (For cases with small Primer Pocket Holes
2. Case Cleaner (Vibrator or Tumbler)
3. Dillon Super Swage Decapper 600 (There are other types! for less! But it is the Cadillac)
4, Hand Crank Case Timmer with Various Guides(Trimming 5.56 Cases to OAL of 1.750)
5. Calipers For measuring OAL
6. Hand Chamfering Tool (For Removing Burs after trimming Inside and Out of Case.)
7. It has been recommended using CCI #41 Primers (Their Material is slightly harder than most Primers/ To Mil Spec. standards.)
IMO that could be the reason that some who load 5.56 NATO Cases after they have been fired the Crimp Swaged and Reloaded have had Primers pop out on occasions.
You may already have some of the above since obviously you do reload! So just the items for the 5.56 NATO reloading would be a consideration at this point.
But as stated if you can get thousands of Brass Cases and the fact it would open the door to be able to locate more and load them correctly, it might be well worth it?

03
Sniper, he is reloading. He was saying it wasnt worth it to try and get a different sized decapping pin for those few oddball cases with the small flash holes.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
13,109 Posts
Hydro,
Very Nice Bench. Wow I am envious It is too frippen organized!:p But as I said if you have access to thousands of rounds of 5.56 it might be worth the buying the tools.
I do have one question when you were removing the Primers from the 5.56 NATO Brass and breaking your tool. Did your press have any Flex during the operation. I have a RCBS Rock Chucker Press.
You have a great set up. I really like it!:)

Here is my little Bench with my 338 Lapua Magnum Rifle on it. I have a RCBS Rock Chucker Loading Press as I mentioned. I have it mounted on a heavy Steel portable Drill Press Stand
So I can move it around. Which leaves my smaller Bench open.
Set tool Luggage and bags Clock Bag Gas
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,255 Posts
Hydro,
Very Nice Bench. Wow I am envious It is too frippen organized!:p But as I said if you have access to thousands of rounds of 5.56 it might be worth the buying the tools.
I do have one question when you were removing the Primers from the 5.56 NATO Brass and breaking your tool. Did your press have any Flex during the operation. I have a RCBS Rock Chucker Press.
You have a great set up. I really like it!:)

Here is my little Bench with my 338 Lapua Magnum Rifle on it. I have a RCBS Rock Chucker Loading Press as I mentioned. I have it mounted on a heavy Steel portable Drill Press Stand
So I can move it around. Which leaves my smaller Bench open.
View attachment 247388
Sniper, we are both "bench poor" compared to Hydro. I just need one, period. I don't really want to make one but if I have to I will.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
My son and I built it from 2x4's, 2x10's and plywood. There's kind of a story behind the 2x10 hutch and main shelves. I fully intended to use 1x10's, but they were more expensive than the 2x10's, lol. When I bought the wood back in February, 1x10x8 footers were $17 and some change a piece. the 2x10's were only $12 each, so, 2x10's it was!

On the left you can see 2 shelves I added between the 2x10 uprights. Made those from some plywood that went to a wall hanging shelf system someone gave me. I'll add a couple more over on the right as needed.

Of course, there's also the peg board in the middle there too for hanging some of the tools.

The main table frame is all doubled 2x4's and the legs are three 2x4's. Stringers are single 2x4's. I use the Lee quick change bench plate for the press and I glued and screwed pieces of 2x4's horizontally between 2 stringers so the press base plate is mounted through 3.5" of solid 2x4 with 3/8" bolts (there is zero table flex when using the press).

The table top is 3/4" plywood with a thin layer of resin impregnated MDF on top and bottom. This plywood is often used in concrete forms because it is durable and can be reused over and over. It's also what I used to deck the trailer for my race boat and I had a sheet leftover, so that's why I used it.

The upper hutch is backed by a sheet of that thin luan plywood and the bottom shelf is set back for foot clearance and has a back of some 1/2" plywood I had from something else. Overall the bench is a beast, I guestimate it weighs somewhere around 300 lbs, maybe more, lol.

There is a floor standing shelf unit directly behind me from where I took this photo that holds all the brass, the annealer machine I built, my home made vibrating trickler, cleaning supplies, etc.

On the bottom shelf there you can see several plastic coffee creamer jugs. I keep those there for "trash", "random" and "dirty" brass. Trash is for brass cutoffs when making 300 Blk, or cases that I won't use (like all those Igman brand things that broke my decap pins). Once I get enough, I'll melt it down to use for other things. Random is for cases I pick up at the range that I don't currently shoot or reload. Who knows, might need them one day, or get enough I can trade for something else. Dirty is fired, decapped brass that needs to go in the tumbler.

It's definitely not organized at the moment only because I was in the middle of converting some 223/5.56 to 300 Blackout when I took this shot. Even when not, there isn't so much stuff as I keep all my powder, primers, etc upstairs in a separate cabinet:

Shelf Shelving Building Wood Box
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
13,109 Posts
Hydro
SIMPLY OUTSTANDING!
:)
What a set up and an outstanding Job on the Bench!
Sorry for my Elementary Post at the start of the Thread regarding the 5.56 NATO Brass! Brother you have it together!
Could we hear a little more about your annealer you made..

03
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I posted it over in DIY projects last month when I built it:

 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top