Does Parker Hale make good guns

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by reecesinclair17, Nov 2, 2014.

  1. reecesinclair17

    reecesinclair17 New Member

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    I Am looking for a new gun and I don't know what a good is a gun I want a 7mm rem mag
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Your question should be: DID Parker-Hale make good rifles? Before they got out of the gunmaking business, they made VERY good rifles- including long range sniper rifles- and they pretty much introduced the hammer forged rifle to Britain.

    Unless someone wanted to make me a REALLY sweet offer, and I was looking for a working gun, I would look at something in production where I could get parts. (Said the old man that collects .22 rifles made in the 1940s)

    I am personally partial to Browning- expensive but worth it. Savage has been making very decent bolt guns for a good price- but this is one of those questions you can ask 6 of us- and get at least 7 answers.
     

  3. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I have to agree with C3 on Parker Hale being a good gun and they haven't been made for awhile. Just out of curiosity what got you interested in Parker Hale?
     
  4. reecesinclair17

    reecesinclair17 New Member

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    Just a Friend of mine has one that he said he whould sell to me
     
  5. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    If you don't mind me prying what are you wanting to use it for and what caliber is that Parker Hale? And the only reason I ask is because there are a lot of good guns out there to choose from but some guns are much better at fulfilling specific needs. For example a 7mm Mag is a great hunting caliber for big game especially at long distances but it's not particularly good for just shooting at the range because of all the recoil and the expense of the ammo. :)
     
  6. reecesinclair17

    reecesinclair17 New Member

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    It is a 7mm rem mag yes I am planing on hunting big game wraith it
     
  7. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    The 7mm Mag is a great big game round and a lot of people swear by it. Parker-Hale is also a great gun but that gun is going to have some age on it. There's no telling how well it's going to shoot and for a 7mm mag you want a very accurate rifle. The advantage of the 7mm mag is distance but you have to have an accurate rifle to go along with a powerful round to shoot game a long ways out. If the rifle isn't that accurate then there is no point in taking the extra recoil of a 7mm mag.

    The game you are planning on hunting is also important. For deer I wouldn't go with a 7mm mag unless you plan on shooting long distances. There are just to many other calibers that will work just as well with a lot less recoil for deer out to 300 yards. Elk are a different story, and the 7mm mag would be a great caliber if you plan on hunting both.

    Where you live is going to be a factor as well. There are a lot of places where you are lucky to find a place you can shoot 100 yards such as in parts of the south. There is no need to get a long range rifle if you live in a place where you will almost never shoot long distances. Out west is a different story. Where you are going to hunt matters as well because you can still find places to shoot long distances even in the south such as farm land, but you have to have access to such places.

    Finally there is the gun itself. I love old rifles and I love tinkering with them to get them to shoot well. A rifle with that much age on it will probably need a little work to get it to shoot tight groups. If you are willing to put in some effort to get it to shot tight groups then it might make a truly great rifle. And that's assuming the barrel is in good shape, which it most likely is because most hunting rifles aren't used that much. Most 7mm mags aren't used that much either because of the recoil and cost of ammo. So with some effort you can probably get that gun to shoot very well but that isn't guaranteed and that's just a chance you take with older rifles. But if you can get it to shoot tight groups then you will have something special. Most of today's rifles aren't even in the ballpark as those older ones in terms of quality. But most of the new ones are pretty accurate right out of the box.

    Just some stuff to think about. :)
     
  8. Warlock999

    Warlock999 New Member

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    Parker Hale made some fine rifles years ago. i have run across a few over they years at gun shows. usually stupidly priced.

    how familiar are you with shooting a 7mm Magnum? it's not the lightest recoiling round there is, and for sure not cheap to shoot.

    if you do decide to buy the rifle, i hope you will give it the respect and attention a rifle of that caliber deserves. i have seen several very nice rifles gone under the butcher's blade in an attempt to make them something they were never meant to be in the first place. always made me sad to see a nice rifle have that happen to it.
     
  9. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Member

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    They did and I owned a .303 on a Mk4 action that was made by Parker Hale(non military commercial model).

    I wish I didn't sell that rifle as it had the factory 5 shot mag BUT it also took the military 10 shot mag as well.
    It was a good rifle and certainly worked well on pigs and goats.
    I would definitely not worry about reliability problems but if your not real sure get a gunsmith to look at it first.
     
  10. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I would not be shy about hunting with a 7mm, even if I never planned to shoot a deer further than 45 yards. I want a deer to go down with a well placed shot. I don't want the deer running off to have someone else gutting the deer when I find it. I want the deer dead, instantly. I shoot a 12ga shotgun slug for those reasons. The 7mm would would just be a high speed, low drag, slug.

    I would look for a well made gun with classic lines. I would get a Browning or a Weatherby with a nice walnut stock.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2014
  11. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Member

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    Nothing wrong with the 7mm cartridge as such but as with all calibres correct bullet placement is the key to a successful hunt.

    Misplacing a solid slug out of a shotgun is just as bad as a badly placed bullet on a animal and a combination of hydraulic shock and major arteries plus bone being smashed will drop any animal on the planet if not instantly very close to it.

    Try your solid slug on a buffalo and see if it drops instantly because I can assure you that even hit with something as powerful as a .458 will still see a buffalo run off a distance before dropping.
    Same as our Sambar deer here in Australia blokes use everything from .308 up to and including .458's and the Sambar still manage to run off and that's after being hit from anywhere from 20' to 50 yds in very thick scrub.
     
  12. CaptMidnight

    CaptMidnight New Member Supporter

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    The various .284 caliber rifles have been used successfully for hunting as well as military applications. The 7MM Remington was originally designed for hunting elk in open parks in the West. The fast twist and long barrels were for using the 175 grs. bullet. Modern recoil sensitive shooters chose lighter bullets at higher velocities. The 7MM Mag. becomes a wounding meat damaging rifle. It is not the fault of rifle or the original loads. :)