Do you shoot your Colt Python?

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by Mercator, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    Fellow python keepers: I like to shoot mine, but thinking I might need to stop before the mainspring wears out or other problems emerge. It is in exc cond inside and out. But parts are scarce and no longer made, and competent python smiths are near extinction. Do you keep yours locked up, or do you enjoy the superb action while it lasts?
     
  2. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    If I had one, I imagine I would shoot it occasionally. I would only use light pressure loads, though. I prefer to shoot all my firearms, at least sometimes. I don't own any safe queens, but a Python would be the closest thing to it (if I owned one), but would still get shot on occasion. I'm talking like once every six months or so.
     

  3. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    That's exactly what happens. I seldom shoot it, and I lose touch with it (the muscle memory for each individual handgun) Takes a few shots every time to get back in the groove. Then why shoot at all, if I can score the same off the bat with a well practiced ruger.
     
  4. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I don't own a python but I do own a pair of diamondbacks. If I am going to clean the gun anyway, I am going to take it out and shoot it. I kept the guns all these years because I enjoy shooting them.
     
  5. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    I will gladly shoot your colt python.
     
  6. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    ****. If I had one, it'd be my daily carry. I don't buy guns to collect and try to keep pristine. They ain't the blamin "Bubble Boy".

    Learn how to work on it, learn how to keep up the finish, learn how to do some minor machining, learn what parts are interchangeable or capable of being altered from other guns.

    Good smiths are a dying breed? So become one.
     
  7. diggler

    diggler New Member

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    My python makes a range trip a couple times a year, but always with lighter loads. It was my dad's service weapon and it has seen lots of use but it is still crisp and clean. I only have a couple true collector guns, all of them rifles which have never been fired. But they look to good to risk dings at the range.
     
  8. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    I only use professional handgun service shops for my collectible handguns. Cylinder and Slide can repair Colt "Snakes".:)

    http://www.cylinder-slide.com/
     
  9. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    I have shot mine in the past, but no longer. Mine are all Royal Blue and I don't want them to develop a turn lines. It's been years since I've shot one. I bought the S&W Performance Center 627 as the closest thing to Python quality and I shoot it all the time.
     
  10. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    That's I think where I am heading. Mine's royal blue as well. I try to think of it as money in the bank. Like many guys here I do not keep safe queens. This may be one in a lifetime exception. If I spend on a Model 327 today, the Colt value covers it and more. If I seriously train with the Colt, the mainspring will go first (replaceable, thanks nitestalker for the C&S tip), then the bluing (serious depreciation).

    If I could change one thing on the Python, it would be the front sight. The blade is too thick for longer range. It would be a major custom job to get a gold bead sight. I've left no stone unturned looking for one - couldn't find it. So why not leave it alone, all stock, and reassign it to the family jewels.

    I appreciate everyone's opinions. Feel free to challenge mine.
     
  11. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    The "Python" does have a problem with timing failures. The action was dated when Colt introduced the revolver. In the 1960s police Departments and civilians had too many problems in the expensive Colt. It was dropped by Colt due to the more popular S&W Mdl. 19. I really prefer shooting the .38 Spl. in these guns and allow these old veterans a peaceful retirement. :)
     
  12. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    Mine is still running fine.
    It was purchased in 1965 by my Dad, who put tens of thousands of rounds through it over the years. He shot PPC and Hunters Pistol Silhouette with it. They will stand up to good solid use, if one is so inclined. The so-called "delicate" lockwork isn't that fragile when treated with a bit of respect. I don't shoot it as much as I used to, I guess one could say it's gone to "Sunday Driver" status. It still gets shot though, now & then. I suppose if it was all I had, I wouldn't be shy about shooting it. FWIW, I too have a 627 PC that fills the gap rather well for most uses.
    I have one safe queen, a fancy commemorative 1911 that was a gift. It's one more than I need.

    I have been meaning to have a word with Colt and see if they will re-blue it when it turns 50.
    Jack First is still making some parts for them, BTW. I'm certain there are other sources as well.
     
  13. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    I certainly would not go modifying the Python. That's a sure fire way to ruin the value. If you've got a nice condition Python, keep it nice and don't shoot it. If you're dead set of shooting one, there are plenty of shooter grade Pythons for sale that someone else has already ruined as far as value and collectability, but still shoots good. That's what you need. Heck, I had one that someone had used one of those electric engraving pens on and they etched their own SSN into the side plate of the gun and on the bottom of the barrel. It made me sick to look at, but it shot just as good as my other guns.

    And like I said, a S&W Performance Center revolver will be just as sweet to shoot for less money and from a company that will still service it and still makes parts for. Mine even came with a gold bead front sight.
     
  14. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    Someone etched his Social Security # on a revolver? That's Saturday Night Live. You should post a pic in a new thread. Titled "Top Ten Worst Things One Can Do With His SSN - Or With His Gun"
     
  15. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    It was a 6" blued model. I sold it several years ago.
     
  16. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    The American gun market makes collectible firearms. Had the Python have been a market success it would be for sale in every LGS. The S&W Mdl. 19 was the market winner and it is available in an up dated form.
    The Colt Company lost the revolver market after more than 150 years. Because they lost Colt Revolvers are among the most sought after collectible firearms. It takes failure to make collectibles.:)
     
  17. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    I don't own firearms can can't used so for me IF I had a colt it would be well used
     
  18. string1946

    string1946 New Member

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    I have only owned my Python for a few months and haven't gotten around to shooting it but I fully intend to in the near future. I have a bunch of full wadcutter 38 specials loaded and that is probably what I will run through it.
     

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  19. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    When I had a Python, I shot it, to the tune of just over 6,000 rounds.

    When I found it would not take my heavy .357 Magnum rounds (too long) I cut back to the milder .357 JHP or .38 Special +P ammo. Other than that, I never had any trouble with the Python.

    But then came S&W's excellent Model 586 Distinquished Combat Magnum..............

    Bob Wright
     
  20. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Bob, The failure of Police owned Pythons in the 1960s was due to magnum loads. Colt never knew or didn't warn users about the older actions not being able to handle constant high pressure loads.:confused: